Emergency Management and Homeland Security


   For frequently asked questions about Denver’s Outdoor Warning Siren System and a map of the siren locations, please click here

Summer is finally here! What better ways to enjoy the sun and warm weather than with a dip in the pool, a baseball game, or neighborhood BBQ! And while summer is a great time to sit back and enjoy the weather, heat hazards can turn a picnic into panic.

Heat can be harmful because it pushes the human body beyond its limits. In extreme heat and high humidity, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature. It’s important to always be prepared, so that the only heat you're feeling is off the grill!

According to Ready.gov, here are a few simple things you can do inside and outside of your home to beat the heat

Severe Weather Reminders - Things you need to know

  • The National Weather Service (NWS) is the official source of severe weather warnings and watches.
  • When you hear outdoor warning sirens, you should seek shelter and seek information. 
  • Due to technology constraints, alerts from the NWS may hit different warning devices at different times.  So you may receive an alert on your mobile device, hear a message on your TV/radio, or hear outdoor warning sirens at different times.  You should always take protective actions at the first alert you receive.  Do not wait for additional alerts before taking action.
  • If you are outside, go to a pre-designated shelter area such as a safe room, basement, storm cellar, or the lowest building level. If there is no basement, go to the center of an interior room on the lowest level (closet, interior hallway) away from corners, windows, doors, and outside walls. Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside. Do not open windows.
  • Once you are inside and safe, tune to local media (TV, radio, mobile device, etc.) or NOAA weather alert radio to be informed of the storm location, path and the duration of the warning. There is no all-clear signal issued.  Once the warning has expired or is cancelled, it is safe to leave your shelter location.  Be aware, however, that the NWS may extend a warning or issue a new warning at any time, so remain vigilant.
  •  We strongly recommend that every residence, business and school use a weather alert radio or sign-up for weather alerts on your mobile device. For Denver alerts click here. 
  • For more information on what to do during a tornado event, you may visit Ready.gov - http://www.ready.gov/tornadoes.

Denver Weather Forecast for today


Information for people with disabiliteis:

"7 Positions CERTs With Disabilities Can Serve When Disaster Strikes" - Many people, including those of us with disabilities, wonder what role disabled CERT members can play during an actual disaster or incident. The answer is: anything that person feels comfortable with, as long as it isn’t beyond the scope of his or her CERT training. Here are seven examples of assignments that CERTs with disabilities can and have done during actual incidents:...

Ready Program
Ready is a national public service advertising (PSA) campaign designed to educate and empower Americans to prepare for and respond to emergencies including natural and man-made disasters. The goal of the campaign is to get the public involved and ultimately to increase the level of basic preparedness across the nation.

Contact Us

The Mayor's Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security

1437 Bannock Street, Room 3
Denver, CO 80202
Phone: 720-865-7600
Fax: 720-865-7691


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