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Cuatro Vientos/Four Winds Park Opens in Denver’s Westwood Neighborhood

Cuatro Vientos/Four Winds Park Opens in Denver’s Westwood Neighborhood
Community’s First New Park in 30 Years

DENVER – The City and County of Denver, residents and leaders from the Westwood community celebrated the official opening of Cuatro Vientos/Four Winds Park on September 6.  The community commemorated the opening of the park with a neighborhood celebration featuring cultural performances, healthy activities for kids and adults, and an official ribbon-cutting ceremony.

“Our parks bring this city together, and for the residents of Westwood, this park has clearly been a long time coming,” Mayor Michael B. Hancock said.  “We are committed to continue meaningful investment into new parks, especially  in  neighborhoods and communities that are in need of additional amenities like open spaces, trails and better playgrounds.  In order for our youngest residents to have the opportunity to live a vibrant, healthy lifestyle, it’s our job to ensure that they have access to the tools they need to help them stay fit and active.”

Located along Alameda just a few blocks west of Morrison Road, the park is the first new park to be built in this community in more than 30 years.

Before the property was purchased in 2009, the site of this new park once included a run-down mobile home park and a bar. Working with grants from Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) and the Denver Office of Economic Development, as well as assistance from the Trust for Public Land and funds from the Better Denver Bond Program, Denver Parks and Recreation purchased the land.  After an extensive planning and design process with the community, which gained national recognition from the American Planning Association for outstanding community planning and engagement, the community broke ground for the new park in November 2013.

Denver City Councilman Paul Lopez was instrumental in making the park a reality, helping to forge a strong partnership between the city and local community.

“This is what happens when good people never cease working together,” said Councilman Lopez, who represents the area and had the initial vision for the new park.  “Cuatro Vientos/Four Winds Park embodies that spirit.  Its name honors the many people from the four directions who have made this neighborhood and city their home.”

The park will increase the open space in a neighborhood that falls well under the national standard of 10 acres per 1,000 residents.  It provides a vibrant and active community open space that includes a playground and interactive water feature, turf areas for fitness/sport activities, a picnic shelter, and new landscaping.  Its location, situated on a hill rising up from W. Alameda Ave., also provides spectacular views of the Denver skyline.  Cuatro Vientos/Four Winds Park was chosen as the name by the local community because they felt it was representative of the many different cultures that make up the Westwood community.

“We are always doing everything we can to identify new park locations around the city and specifically within those communities that lack these amenities,” said Lauri Dannemiller, Executive Director of Denver Parks and Recreation.  “Cuatro Vientos/Four Winds Park is a perfect example of how local residents and community leaders can get engaged and help us make our goal a reality.”

Click to view more photos from Saturday's event. 

About Denver Parks and Recreation

Denver Parks and Recreation (DPR) facilities are unrivaled in the Rocky Mountain West. The DPR system spans over a 146-year history, from the first park created in 1868 to nearly 20,000 acres of urban parks and mountain parkland today. Within the city limits, Denver’s park system embraces nearly 6,000 acres of “traditional” parks, parkways and urban natural areas.