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Classification and Compensation

 

The Office of Human Resources (OHR) Classification and Compensation division develops and manages the City and County of Denver’s classification and compensation plan and provides related analysis and consultation to ensure market-competitive pay to attract and retain extraordinary talent that delivers exceptional service to the residents of Denver. For additional assistance please contact the Classification and Compensation division at compensation@denvergov.org.

At the City and County of Denver, classification and compensation decisions are a collaborative effort between the hiring manager, higher-level management and the Office of Human Resources (OHR). Implementation of consistent and appropriate pay practices are instrumental to OHR’s overall talent strategy to attract, motivate, retain and engage qualified employees and to ensure compliance with applicable federal, state and local laws/regulations and the City and County of Denver rules. The success of OHR’s compensation program hinges on the ability to appropriately compete with the external labor market, ensure internal pay equity, recognize and reward exceptional performance and foster a shared sense of fairness. 

OHR’s Classification and Compensation division is responsible for the development and administration of the city’s classification program; however, every employee has a responsibility to ensure its success.  In accordance with federal guidelines, enforced by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), it is unlawful to knowingly or unknowingly discriminate in pay or application of employment practices, and therefore all salary decisions must be made without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, marital status, military status, age, disability, or political affiliation or any other status protected by federal, state or local laws. 

The City and County of Denver maintains a pay for performance program that includes both an annual performance review and a merit increase.

Merit Increases

When available, an eligible career service employee will receive a merit increase based on the employee's performance rating and location within the pay range (i.e. quartile). 

The City and County of Denver’s merit budget is approved by the Career Service Board, City Council and the mayor each year. 

The 2018 merit table has been approved. For more details, view the Employee Q&A and the Manager Q&A.

2018 merit table has three rows, and five columns. The headers are 2017 Performance Rating, 2018 Merit Increase Percent*, and 2018 Lump Sum Merit Payment Percent**. If an employee is rated at a 5: Exceptional, 4: Exceeds Expectations, or 3: Successful, s/he is eligible for 2.60%-4.60% merit increase percent. If an employee is rated at a 5: Exceptional, or 4: Exceeds Expectations, s/he is eligible for 1.80%-3.20% 2018 lump sum payment percent. If an employee is rated at a 2:Below Expectations or 1: Unacceptable, they are not eligible for a 2018 merit increase percent. If an employee is rated at 3: Successful, 2:Below expectations or 1: Unacceptable, they are not eligible for a 2018 lump sum merit payment percent.

*For employees whose current pay rate is within their pay range, including those who may reach the top of their pay range due to merit increase and become eligible for the remaining portion to be paid to them as a lump sum payment.
**For employees whose current pay rate is at or above their pay range maximum.

Find Key 2017 Performance Review and Merit Program Dates and more by visiting the Performance Management webpage.

OHR performs an annual market analysis in the Denver metropolitan area to determine what pay survey adjustments, if any, should be recommended for occupational groups and/or classifications covered by the classification and pay plan. 

When the annual market pay survey data indicates the city’s pay for an occupational group has fallen behind market, OHR recommends a structure increase for the occupational group. If the city’s rates are above the market, OHR recommends no change. View occupational group definitions.

Individual classifications may be increased to a higher pay grade based on the results of the annual market pay survey analysis. The classification typically must be 10% behind the market to be considered for an adjustment. 

View the Market Pay Survey webpage for more information.

View the City and County of Denver's job specifications.

An individual position audit is a management-requested review of an employee's current permanently assigned job duties in relation to their current classification. Visit the Individual Position Audit webpage to see how an individual position audit is requested, and the steps required.

A progressive classification series audit is a review of an employee having met certain time-in-job, education, or training requirements enabling the progression of the employee to the next level in a classification series. Progressive classification series are an arrangement of classes in sequence that are alike in kind but differ in level, and they are identified and approved as progressive classes by the Classification and Compensation Division in partnership with agency management. A pay change to the minimum of the new classification or a 2.25% pay increase will occur with a progressive classification reallocation. View the Job Specifications webpage for more information.

Classification studies are typically studies of the classification duties when the Classification and Compensation Division determines that an in-depth review of the classification is warranted.  They are done as needed throughout the year and typically do not results in changes to individual pay rates  unless the classification is upgraded and an employee’s pay is below the range minimum. 

View the Pay Ranges & Job Titles table for more specific information.

promotion is an appointment of an employee to a higher level vacant position in a new classification with a completely new set of duties. View the Career Service Rules to learn more.

A progressive classification series audit is a review of an employee having met certain time-in-job, education, or training requirements enabling the progression of the employee to the next level in a classification series. Progressive classification series are an arrangement of classes in sequence that are alike in kind but differ in level, and they are identified and approved as progressive classes by the Classification and Compensation Division in partnership with department/agency management. A pay change to the minimum of the new classification or a 2.25% pay increase will occur with a progressive classification reallocation. View the Job Specifications webpage for more information.

A pay equity adjustment is a change to an employee's pay to maintain internal equity within a group/unit or classification. Read more about pay equity adjustments to see how an equity pay adjustment is requested and the steps required. Download the pay equity adjustment form.

Working out of class is when an appointing authority temporarily assigns the duties of a vacant position in a higher-level classification to an employee in a lower-level classification for a period of one year. Employees are eligible for additional pay for such assignments when they have been assigned all of the duties and responsibilities of the vacant position in the higher-level classification. View the Career Service Rules to learn more.

Equipment differential shall be paid to employees who are temporarily assigned to operate equipment that has a higher level classification that the employee’s current classification, and who are not receiving additional pay for a work assignment outside of job classification. View the Equipment Differential Guide.

View the Pay Ranges & Job Titles table for more specific information.

Bilingual stipend is an additional payment on an employee’s paycheck, paid to employees who meet specific conditions. Career Service Rule 9 outlines the bilingual services stipend including who is eligible to receive a per pay period stipend, how much the stipend will be based on the level of proficiency, and when the employee is no longer eligible for the bilingual services stipend. Visit the Bilingual Stipend webpage to learn how to view the bilingual stipend request process, download the bilingual stipend request form, and more.

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Questions?

Email: Compensation@denvergov.org

For outside organizations requesting salary survey information, please use the email address above.

Career Service Rule 9 describes different ways that employees can receive a pay rate change. Some of the more common pay changes are promotions, reallocation, pay adjustment within the range (equity adjustment), overtime, shift differential, equipment differentials and working out of classification. View the Career Service Rules to learn more.

Each employee’s classification title is located under the Pay worklet in Workday.