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About WCPM

Wastewater Capital Projects Management (WCPM), a division of Public Works, is responsible for the planning, design, and construction of citywide sanitary, storm drainage, and water quality capital improvement projects. WCPM coordinates with federal, state, local agencies, environmental organizations, developers, and community organizations to ensure that the City’s wastewater facilities meet our neighborhoods growing needs while meeting or exceeding regulatory requirements.  WCPM is responsible for implementing approximately $35M annually in capital improvements through the Wastewater Enterprise Fund.  

WCPM consists of three distinct teams, Planning, Design, and Construction.

 

WCPM Planning

WCPM Planning is composed of six full time staff members who lead citywide storm, sanitary, and water quality master planning, project identification, prioritization, early project development, programming and expenditure modeling.  In addition, the planning team manages on-call professional service and construction contracts, provides technical support on city projects, and assists with drainage complaints and City Council communication.

WCPM Design

WCPM Design is composed of eight full time staff members who manage in-house and consultant-led designs of storm, sanitary, and water quality projects.  These projects include pipes, ponds and open channel improvement projects.  Projects vary in size from 8-inch to 120-inch diameter; vary in cost from $200k to $40M+ each; and vary in technique including open-cut, tunneling, and lining.  A typical WCPM design project involves technical analysis, plan sets, reports, stakeholder coordination, constructability reviews, cost estimating, public outreach and contract documentation in preparation for a construction bid.

WCPM Construction

WCPM Construction is composed approximately 20 full time staff members who implement construction of storm, sanitary, river and gulch, water quality, and other department projects.  Projects vary in size, scope, and complexity.  WCPM construction provides full in-house construction project management services throughout the lifecycle of a project including constructability input and review, project management, project inspection, project closeout, and warranty management.  

 

WCPM team on construction site, wearing safety gear

WCPM project manager, engineers, and engineer supervisor at First Creek Restoration Project

 

Annual Projects

This is an annual on‐going program to complete multiple projects to address flooding and other storm water management issues City‐wide. Examples of projects include

  • extending existing storm sewers
  • replacing corroded storm pipes
  • constructing storm drains and open channels
  • constructing interceptor lines where needed

Benefits/Avoided Losses:

Storm drainage improvements constructed in this program help to reduce localized flooding problems, as well as reduces impacts on maintenance staff, time, and equipment in responding repeatedly to the same location.

Examples

sample maps of storm improvements in neighborhoods

This provides “seed money” for project development work and tasks related to storm drainage projects in the 6‐year Capital Improvement Program that are budgeted in a future fiscal year, but for which scoping analysis is needed now. This work includes engineering studies, utility locates & dig‐ups, environmental, professional services, etc.

Benefits/Avoided Losses:

This allows issues to be investigated prior to design in order to improve the formal design process of future‐funded storm drainage projects.

This provides annual funding for planning and feasibility studies to refine future storm drainage capital improvement projects identified in the City’s Storm Drainage Master Plan.

Benefits/Avoided Losses:

This provides funding to respond to storm drainage investigations not anticipated during the annual budget cycle so that projects can continue to be developed

Annual project for repairs, rehabilitation, and pre‐construction activities on capital projects underway in the City and County of Denver, to support timelines and schedules.

This is an annual sanitary sewer program to improve deteriorated gravity‐drained sanitary sewer pipes using either “open trench” digging methods or lining existing sanitary sewers.

Each project is evaluated based on site‐specific needs in order to determine the most cost effective methods. Wherever possible, lining technologies are used, which reduces construction time as compared with open trench methods. Since no excavation is required, utilities and traffic conflicts are minimized and inconvenience to residents can be significantly reduced.

Locations for this rehabilitation are throughout the City of Denver. This project will line approximately 75,000 feet of liner of various sizes.

Benefits/Avoided Losses:

The benefit of this program is to extend the life of the city sanitary system through cost‐effective methods that minimize the impact to the citizens of Denver. A second benefit is to improve water and groundwater quality by lining existing sanitary systems that have cracks and may be leaking.

This provides “seed money” for project development work and tasks related to sanitary sewer projects in the 6‐year Capital Improvement Program that are budgeted in a future fiscal year, but for which scoping analysis is needed now. This work includes engineering studies, utility locates & dig‐ups, environmental, professional services, etc.

Benefits/Avoided Losses:

This allows issues to be investigated prior to design in order to improve the formal design process of future‐funded sanitary projects.

This is an on‐going cost‐shared program with Public Works' Street Maintenance division for improvements to the City's curbs, gutters and cross‐pans, handicap ramps, and miscellaneous concrete repairs to facilitate drainage in the streets and to address critical safety hazards.

Benefits/Avoided Losses:

Areas selected for repair are typically in advance of street paving that is scheduled for the following year. Improvements to deteriorated portions of curbs and gutters help to direct storm drainage to the nearest storm drain intake.

Cost‐sharing with Street Maintenance funding improves the amount that can be done.  Additionally, this program focuses on specific areas with the highest needs thereby ensuring better bids and more efficient allocation of funds and staffing resources.

Planning

In accordance with Denver Revised Municipal Code, Chapter 56, Article III, Division 4, Section 56‐110, Denver’s Storm Drainage Master Plan is updated every five (5) years in order to identify and alleviate present and future drainage problems in the City.

Storm Drainage Master Plan

Benefits/Avoided Losses:

  • Provides a high‐level assessment of the drainage needs throughout the city in order to identify where existing storm drain infrastructure does not meet current criteria and where new storm drains are needed.
  • Includes new information gleaned from other drainage studies conducted in the past five years.
  • Provides updated storm drainage project costs based on the most up‐to‐date cost data from recently‐bid projects.
  • Provides a mechanism to coordinate projects with other Divisions within Public Works such as the Bridge Group, Street Maintenance Division, as well as Policy, Planning, and Sustainability.
  • Identifies a menu of projects in conjunction with ongoing studies, from which to build the 6‐year Capital Improvement Plan budget.
  • Utilized by developers and engineers to provide an overview of drainage issues affecting specific sites and areas.
  • Informs Community Planning & Development (CPD) Neighborhood Plans and Station Area Plans.
  • Informs council members and residents about the potential for drainage problems in their community and to be proactive in addressing potential flood concerns.

Sanitary Master Plan Update projects are planning, design, implementation and/or grant initiatives typically related to partnerships with other agencies, like Metro Wastewater or RTD, whereby a project is co‐funded and co‐sponsored with mutual benefits for all parties involved.

Sanitary Sewer Master Plan (PDF) — 2009

Benefits/Avoided Losses:

The goals of these projects are similar to both Annual and Discretionary projects, to provide necessary improvements to the identified needed locations to restore the existing system in place and/or increase the system's capacity to meet a future need.

Water Quality

The Water Quality program provides a means to construct facilities to reduce pollutants in stormwater runoff and meet the current TMDL for E. coli that exists on the South Platte River, as well as future regulations for nutrients.

The implementation program provides annual funding for planning and feasibility studies of water quality initiatives that build a robust and innovative stormwater program.

Water quality facilities, also known as green infrastructure, provide other citywide benefits including increased open space, heat island mitigation, improved air quality, and linkages for connectivity in urban corridors. Below is a draft priority basin map:

draft map showing priority basins in the City and County of Denver ranked by water quality score

The Water Quality program provides a means to construct facilities to reduce pollutants in stormwater runoff and meet the current TMDL for E. Coli that exists on the South Platte River and future regulations for nutrients.

Water quality facilities, also known as green infrastructure, provide other citywide benefits including increased open space, heat island mitigation, improved air quality, and linkages for connectivity in urban corridors.

The construction program provides funding for the construction of water quality facilities based upon opportunities defined in the Water Quality Implementation Plan (Scorecard).

Public Restrooms Program is a citywide initiative to provide public restroom facilities in strategic locations around the city. A public health, safety, and water quality benefit is anticipated with the construction and use of these facilities.

Public Restroom pilot program information and locations (2016) »

 

Contacts

Call 3-1-1
Outside Denver: 720-913-1311

Call 3-1-1 — Ask for Development Services Manager

Flood Information & Resources

Email: floodplain@denvergov.org
Phone: Call 311 — ask for Floodplain Administrator

Call 3-1-1 — Request “ice-blading”

FAQ for Snow and Ice Removal

Program Hotline: 720-460-9055

www.denvergov.org/adaramps