Real Estate

The Real Estate Division maintains the City's real estate portfolio via assessment of the City's short and long term real estate needs. By assessing those needs, this group determines how to maximize asset efficiencies to effectively ensure optimum financial resources are available to the City for the benefit of the employees and citizens.

Mission Statement

To provide cost-effective management of the city's real estate portfolio, perform real estate services for all city agencies, create ideal working environments for city employees, and proactively meet the city's short and long term real estate needs.

Frequently Asked Questions

Where can I acquire a list of city-owned properties? surplus properties? real estate in my neighborhood?

There is not a "list" of city-owned or surplus property available from the Division of Real Estate Office; however, you can contacted the Assessment Office at 720 913-4000 to inquire whether city is the owner of a particular parcel. If the city is the owner and you need more information concerning that property, contact the Division of Real Estate at 720 865-4395. Please ask the Assessment Office for a schedule number for that property to facilitate an accurate search of property ownership.

They are planning a new street development by my house. What happens if the city requires a portion or all of my property for right-of-way purposes?

National and state governments have the power of eminent domain - the power to take private property for public use - but the owner must be fairly compensated. The city can acquire land from private individuals by means of eminent domain for public use (i.e. streets and highways) with compensation to the owner. Authority to exercise the Right of Eminent Domain for public use is based upon the theory that property is granted to the property owner upon condition that it may be taken to serve the necessities of the government. Agencies created by the State or City to serve the public may exercise the Right of Eminent Domain (ex: Division of Real Estate or Public Works). One of the fundamental precepts of acquiring private property must be paid Just Compensation - the owner is entitled to receive what a willing buyer would pay in cash to a willing seller at the time of the taking. Federal and State policies establish uniform, fair and equitable treatment of persons displaced by the acquisition of real property. The acquisition of private property for public use is governed by rules and regulations, of which the most important are:

  1. Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution covers the making of private property for public use. This limitation, contained in the Fifth Amendment, was the first provision of the Bill of Rights to be incorporated within the Fourteenth Amendment - to be enforced as a limitation on state governments as well as on the national government.
  2. The Colorado Constitution, Article 11, Section 15 covers the taking of private property.

National, state and municipal governments have the power of eminent domain or the power to take private property for the public's use. Eminent domain is established and granted overall in the Fifth Amendment of the US Constitution and by the various state constitutions and local ordinances. The authority to exercise the right of eminent domain for public use is based on the theory that property is granted to the property owner upon the condition that it may be taken to serve the necessities (public use) of the government and that the owner will receive just compensation for the taking. The keys to this authority are public use and just compensation. Read more...

I have gone to the Assessment Office and they have told me that a property is owned by the City and County of Denver, how can I find out what it is being used for, or if I can buy it?

The Division of Real Estate Office manages a file system that contains records of purchases and uses of city-owned properties. If you are interested in a city-owned property for purchase, the Division of Real Estate Office will provide you with information on the sale process of surplus property.

What is the process for sale of city-owned surplus property?

See General Sales information.

Can you give me some information about the city program where you can buy/lease property "cheaply"?

Sometimes there are programs that the city may participate in that makes funds available for new how purchase or rehabilitation that may be available in the form of grants or assistance. None of these programs originate or are run through the Division of Real Estate Office. A good source for housing and grant programs would be Division of Housing & Neighborhood Development or Denver Housing Authority or local mortgage companies. 

Announcements

  

Contact Us

Division of Real Estate
201 W. Colfax Ave., Dept. 1010
Denver, CO 80202
(720) 865-4395
RealEstate@denvergov.org

Business Hours:
Monday - Friday
7:30a.m. - 4:30p.m.



Denver 311 Help Center

Call 3-1-1
Outside Denver Call (720) 913-1311
Emergencies: 911
TTY Service: 720-913-8479

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