Electronic Monitoring Technologies

The Electronic Monitoring Program utilizes several types of monitoring technologies tailored to the specific criminal history of the offender. Learn more about electronic monitoring programs.

Overview

Continuous alcohol monitoring is an effective technology for offenders/defendants with alcohol related crimes. Currently, alcohol monitoring is conducted using a bracelet that utilizes alcohol monitoring technology.

How it Works

The device tests the offender’s alcohol concentration through the skin (Trans-dermal Alcohol Concentration or TAC). The bracelet is water-resistant and tamper-resistant. The offender is tested at least 24 times per day. If alcohol is detected, the system automatically begins sampling every 20 minutes until alcohol is no longer present.

The results are collected throughout the day and stored in the bracelet. The results are uploaded once a day via a modem in the offenders/defendants home, or once a week in the office. The results are then analyzed and posted on a secure website, so officers can access the information when needed. If the offender/defendant attempts to place objects (tape, playing cards, paper, etc…) between the skin and the bracelet to defeat it, the built-in tamper technology will alert the officer.

Benefits & Success

Continuous alcohol monitoring holds offenders responsible for their sobriety 24 hours a day. The bracelet is non-invasive and does not disrupt the offenders/defendants daily life, Traditional breath tests can cause the offender/defendant to miss work and traditional breath tests cannot monitor drinking continuously, as does this unit. Ultimately continuous alcohol monitoring technology allows courts to hold the individual responsible for their actions while saving money and jail beds.

Continuous alcohol monitoring has been proven in court and upheld in 58 legal cases to date.

Equipment

The current continuous alcohol monitoring bracelet being used by our office, SCRAM, is a two piece unit. It consists of the ankle bracelet and a modem.

The bracelet is fitted around the offenders/defendants ankle securely and collects and stores data 24 hours a day. The offender then downloads the information daily from home via a modem or weekly in our office. The bracelet is tamper and water resistant.

The bracelet communicates with a modem via radio frequency technology that then uploads data via a phone line to the monitoring center. The monitoring center then interprets and reads the data where it is securely stored on a website for a probation officer to access.

Download Instructions

SCRAM Magnet Procedure
SCRAM Modem
Setting up Homeguard w/ SCRAM


Overview

Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking is used to track a person’s location on a constant basis. This type of monitoring is most commonly used for pre-trial defendants out on bond and awaiting trial.

How it Works

An ankle bracelet worn by the defendant collects GPS data from satellites throughout the day. The data collected includes the defendant’s travel speed and direction, plus the time and date. The data is reported to the monitoring center and can be accessed via a secure website. Data is plotted on a map for review by officers. In addition, officers are notified if a defendant enters designated exclusion zones, such as the vicinity of a victim’s residence or work location. If a defendant enters an exclusion zone, immediate action is taken, such as notifying the victim and dispatching police officers if necessary.

Active vs. Passive GPS Monitoring

The Electronic Monitoring Program offers both Active GPS and Passive GPS tracking.

Active GPS ankle bracelets report data near real-time to the monitoring center via cellular communications. Officers can access location data via secure website and monitor the defendants current whereabouts at any time.

Passive GPS ankle bracelets store collected data throughout the day. Each day after returning home the defendant must place the device in a docking station. The docking station sends data to the monitoring center using the defendant’s home phone line. It can then be reviewed by officers via secure website.

Benefits & Success

Since May 2001, the Electronic Monitoring Program has monitored 1451 defendants on GPS totaling more than 101,215 usage days.  Of those defendants 1369 equaling 94%, have completed the program successfully, defendants were either sentenced or GPS was removed from their bond conditions by the court.

Overview

Radio frequency monitoring continues to be Denver's most used type of monitoring technology.  This type of monitoring is used for individuals who are required to be inside their residence at all times or sentenced to a specific curfew. The general public knows this type of monitoring as “house arrest” or “home detention”.

How it Works

This monitoring equipment includes both an ankle bracelet and a monitoring base station. The ankle bracelet emits a specific radio frequency “beacon”, maintaining communication with the base station while the defendant is at home. If the defendant leaves the residence, the base station fails to detect the signal from the bracelet and records the incident. The record includes the date and time the defendant left the residence. A matching record is created when the defendant returns home.

Benefits & Success

Radio frequency monitoring helps to enforce post-conviction requirements. The defendant and their officer establish an agreed upon schedule for work, community service, treatment, and any other approved activities. If a recorded absence from the home occurs within the bounds of the schedule, the officer verifies the whereabouts of the defendant by matching it with documentation from the employer or other approved entity. If the defendant leaves the residence outside the bounds of the schedule, the system notifies the officer of the violation.

Equipment

Base station units are available in a landline version and a cell unit version. Landline base stations stay at the residence plugged into the power and phone lines.

Cell units can be utilized by clients who do not have access to a basic phone line, such as when living in a motel, halfway house, or a home without a phone line. Cell units also feature a built in motion detector to ensure that the client does not move the unit to another location.

Any tampering or removal of the ankle bracelet component is reported by the base station as soon as possible.

Download Instructions

HomeGuard Hook-up Procedure


Our Success

  • Reduced 99,641 jail bed days, representing $1,295,333.00 in savings
  • Collected $1,997,422.06 in client fees
  • Provided community supervision for over 3,200 offenders as an alternative to jail with a 96% success rate


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