Near Southeast Area Plan

Plan Implementation

After two years of community collaboration, a revised draft of the Near Southeast Area Plan was adopted by the Denver City Council at its meeting Monday, May 22. The draft plan offers a community vision for Southeast Denver that focuses on more housing options, safer streets and responding to climate change, putting in place policies that will guide city decision-making for the next twenty years for the neighborhoods of Goldsmith, Indian Creek, University Hills North, Virginia Village and Washington Virginia Vale

Legislative Rezoning

Following the plan's adoption, city planners have started the work of bringing the vision for the Near Southeast Area to life through a city-sponsored legislative rezoning. The purpose of the rezoning is to enact the plan's land use guidance in areas where current rules do not align with the goals identified during the planning process. The areas being considered for rezoning are mainly located along major corridors like Colorado Boulevard, Leetsdale Drive and East Evans Avenue as well as properties governed by Former Chapter 59 (the city's old zoning code).

The intent of this project is to ensure future development in these areas is consistent with the community's vision for development that prioritizes pedestrian safety, community-serving businesses and takes advantage of existing transit options.

How to Get Involved

As the project progresses, opportunities for community members to participate will be posted here. Key milestones will also be shared with the Near Southeast Area Plan email list. 

Sign up to receive updates

 

 

Plan Documents

Overview of the vision for the Near Southeast Area

The Near Southeast Area Plan provides a community vision for the Goldsmith, Indian Creek, University Hills North, Virginia Village and Washington Virginia Vale neighborhoods that will: 

  • Modernize key areas and streets to serve community needs better, improve design and make it easier for locals to get around
  • Focus growth along major corridors (Evans Avenue, Colorado Boulevard, Leetsdale Drive) and major centers (the Colorado and Yale RTD Stations) where redevelopment is most likely to occur and provide benefit to the community
  • Address the need for housing that residents can afford and provide more options for housing while preserving what makes Near Southeast neighborhoods great places to live
  • Improve sustainability by making it easier and safer for people to get out of their cars and through infrastructure and landscapes that support the local ecosystem

Key recommendations

Land Use and Built Form

  • Thoughtful growth – direct growth to appropriate places with infrastructure and elements of a complete neighborhood 
  • Center and corridor upgrades – improve the appearance and functionality of commercial and mixed-use areas
  • Neighborhood values – preserve the affordability and design the community enjoys while adding housing options

Housing and Economy

  • Housing improvements – Expand housing options by improving overall conditions and affordability
  • Community resources – Invest and grow resources in development, education, workforce training and homelessness to improve community connections
  • Local business support – Connect new and existing businesses to financing, incentives and networking to better serve residents

Mobility

  • Corridor improvements – Prioritize safe multimodal transportation options and operational improvements along Near Southeast corridors
  • Pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements – Reduce pedestrian, bicyclist and driver exposure to crashes by providing safe crossing environments, adequate and complete sidewalk space, and comfortable bicycle infrastructure
  • Neighborhood traffic calming – Install traffic calming elements intended to provide visual and physical cues to slow the speed of vehicles in Near Southeast and target areas where safety is of utmost concern, such as schools, parks and commercial nodes

Quality of Life Infrastructure 

  • Green space, landscaping and recreation – ensure the community has access to the parks, trails, and natural amenities they value
  • Sustainability and resiliency – reduce our impact on the climate and prepare the area for the future 
  • Community wellbeing – improve safety and opportunities for healthy living, quality food and community resources

Innovations in the plan

  • Coordinates growth with mobility infrastructure improvements 
  • Provides clear guidance for integrating missing middle housing while reducing displacement, increasing affordability, and improving design outcomes 
  • Emphasizes sustainability and resiliency throughout 

Community priorities

The Near Southeast Area Plan reflects collaboration between city planners and a steering committee of residents, business owners and neighborhood leaders as well as community navigators, who ensured equitable outreach and fidelity to the community’s vision. Intentional engagement work included pop-up events at cultural and faith-based centers and targeted outreach to refugees, immigrants, students, and renters. In total, the planning process captured input from more than 7,255 survey responses, 46 community events, 10 focus groups and more than 4,000 additional touchpoints through the plan's email newsletter, social media, the distribution of fliers throughout the area, one-on-one conversations at community office hours and more. 

Through this outreach, the planning process identified the following community priorities: 

  • Make it safer and easier to move around the area by increasing mobility options and accessibility 
  • Improve and expand housing options and affordability 
  • Improve the look, feel, and functionality of major corridors 
  • Make the area more sustainable and resilient 

Near Southeast Area Plan and Appendices

       


Planning Process and Project Archive

Phase 5: Legislative Review and Adoption

Phase 5 involved the legislative review of the draft plan by the Denver Planning Board and City Council. The plan was adopted after a final hearing and vote on by the Denver City Council at its meeting Monday, May 22, 2023.

What the Planning Team Worked On

  • Updating and strengthening the draft plan
  • Identifying implementation priorities
  • Preparing the plan for the adoption process

What We Asked the Community

  • Does the plan reflect your vision for the future of your neighborhood?
  • Do you support the vision in the plan? 

 


Phase 4: Community review of the draft plan

Phase 4 of the process involved sharing the draft plan that was developed based on the Phase 3 input with the community and gathering feedback on how to improve it.  The planning team worked on the following things: 

What the Planning Team Worked On

  • Hosted meetings, conducted surveys, and attended community events (virtual and in person) to share information and collect input
  • Regular meetings with the community steering committee  
  • Used multiple channels to get word out about the draft recommendations
    • Project website and email list
    • Social media
    • Traditional media outreach
    • Registered neighborhood organizations and other neighborhood groups
    • Schools
    • Yard signs
    • Mailers
  • Went into the community to get the word out about the plan
    • Community workshop at Cook Park Recreation Center
    • Hudson Apartments event
    • Cook Park Rec Center pop-up/office hours
    • Jewish Community Center pop-up/office hours
    • Schlessman YMCA pop-up/office hours
    • University Hills North Community meeting
    • Cook Park RNO meeting
    • Lynwood Neighborhood Association meeting
    • Refugee family meeting
  • Flyers were distributed at:
    • Ross-University Hills Library (DPL)
    • U Hills YMCA
    • Villa Monaco
    • Park Plaza Shopping area
    • Welshire Plaza
    • Shops between Iliff Av. & Warren Ave. on E. side of Colo. Blvd.
    • Shopping Center at 1550 S. Colorado Blvd
    • Century 21 Plaza
    • Square One Center
    • Eisenhower Rec Center
    • Cook Park Rec Center
    • Virginia Village Library (DPL)
    • Virginia Village shopping center (NW corner of Florida & Holly) incl. Unravel Coffee
    • Virginia Shops (SW corner of FL & Holly) incl. Sojourners Coffee
    • Holly Shops/Esters Neighborhood Pub
    • Leetsdale Marketplace Shopping Center
    • Shops at Leetsdale and Monaco
    • Monaco Square
    • South Lowry Marketplace at SE corner of Leetsdale & Quebec
    • Shops at Leetsdale & Oneida
    • Shops at Leetsdale & Holly (N/S of Leetsdale on E side) 

What We Asked the Community

  • How should we improve the land use and design recommendations?
  • How should we improve the residential preservation and affordability recommendations?
  • How should we improve the small business recommendations?
  • How should we improve the mobility corridor recommendations?
  • How should we improve the walking, biking, and transit recommendations?
  • How should we improve the park, trails, and landscaping recommendations?
  • Do you have any general feedback on the draft plan? 

Key Takeaways

Based on input from the community, changes were made to the draft plan to achieve the following: 

  • Clarify missing middle policies and strengthen affordability recommendations
  • Allow additional growth along the Evans corridor with clearer recommendations for improving mobility infrastructure
  • Adjust place and height recommendations to achieve better transitions and compatibility with neighborhoods
  • Update economy related sustainability recommendations to include “Waste No More”
  • Expand arts/cultural economy and continuing education policies with additional recommendations from community input
  • Update and add additional housing statistics and goals
  • Add more detail to trail improvement recommendations
  • Improve streetscape and landscape recommendations for key corridors and parkways
  • Identify additional intersections for pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements
  • Identify additional streets for traffic calming opportunities
  • Add recommendations for additional bike lane opportunities and identify those existing bike lanes needing an upgrade
  • Include additional intersection safety improvements based on neighborhood level feedback 

See more about what we heard in the Comments Spreadsheet(XLSX, 63KB).

How the Community Participated

  • 212 joined the project’s email list in Phase 4 (total is 1,059) 
  • 127 attended the community workshops 
  • 98 took the online surveys 
  • 101 community members met planners at 7 community events
  • Steering committee held 3 meetings 
  • Intentional outreach and participation included:
    • 6 renters at an apartment event
    • 17 in a refugee family focus group 

Results and Resources

Graph showing levels of support for plan


Phase 3: Refine the Recommendations

Phase 3 of the process involved sharing the draft recommendations that were developed based on the Phase 2 input with the community and gather feedback on how to improve them.  The planning team worked on the following things: 

What the Planning Team Worked On

  • Hosted meetings, conducted surveys, and attended community events (virtual and in person) to share information and collect input 
  • Regular meetings with the community steering committee
  • Used multiple channels to get word out about the draft recommendations 
    • Project website and email list
    • Social media
    • Traditional media outreach
    • Registered neighborhood organizations and other neighborhood groups
    • Schools
    • Yard signs
    • Mailers
  • Went into the community to get the word out about the plan 
    • Community workshop at Four Mile House Historic Park
    • Jacobs Park food truck event
    • Ramac Apartments food truck event
    • National Night Out at Cook Park
    • South by Southeast at Bible Park
    • Cook Park Rec Center pop-up/office hours
    • Jewish Community Center pop-up/office hours
    • Schlessman YMCA pop-up/office hours
    • Virginia Village Library pop-up/office hours
    • McMeen Elementary back to school night
    • George Washington High student activity
    • Rocky Mountain School of Expeditionary Learning student activity
    • District 4 Town Hall at Thomas Jefferson High School
  • Flyers were distributed at:
    • Cook Park Rec Center
    • Virginia Village Library Ross-University Hills Library
    • Schlessmann YMCA
    • Villa Monaco
    • Virginia Village shopping center (NW corner of Florida & Holly) incl. Unravel Coffee
    • Virginia Shops (SW corner of FL & Holly) incl. Sojourners Coffee
    • Holly Shops/Esters Neighborhood Pub
    • Park Plaza Shopping area
    • Welshire Plaza
    • Shops between Iliff Av. & Warren Ave. on E. side of Colo. Blvd.
    • Shopping Center at 1550 S. Colorado Blvd
    • Century 21 Plaza
    • Square One Center
    • Eisenhower Rec Center
    • Leetsdale Marketplace Shopping Center
    • Shops at Leetsdale and Monaco
    • Monaco Square
    • South Lowry Marketplace at SE corner of Leetsdale & Quebec
    • Shops at Leetsdale & Oneida
    • Shops at Leetsdale & Holly (N/S of Leetsdale on E side) 

What We Asked the Community

  • Where should growth be directed in the area? 
  • How should we incorporate more housing options?
  • How should the industrial areas evolve?
  • Do the draft land use recommendations reflect the community’s goals for sustainable growth and improved design? 
  • Do the draft housing and economy recommendations reflect the community’s goals for affordability and more local businesses? 
  • Do the draft mobility recommendations reflect the community’s goals for improved safety and convenience? 
  • Do the draft quality of life infrastructure recommendations reflect the community’s goals for more resilient landscaping and parks?

Key Takeaways

  • Direct most growth to key intersections along the corridors and ensure infrastructure needs are met
  • Prioritize affordability and character when integrating new housing options into neighborhoods
  • Ensure corridors and centers transitions well into neighborhoods and minimize impacts from additional height and development
  • Target affordable housing in areas served by amenities and transit 
  • Support new and existing local businesses with a variety of tools
  • Provide additional mobility connections while limiting speeding on neighborhood streets
  • Prioritize sidewalk improvements along routes to key destinations
  • Improve connections to trails at parks and reduce conflicts between users
  • Enhance landscaping in centers and corridors with appropriate trees and plant that limit water use 

See more about what we heard in the Community Input Summary, which will be posted soon.

How the Community Participated

  • 161 joined the project’s email list in Phase 3 (total is 1,008) 
  • 50 attended the community workshops 
  • 903 took the online surveys 
  • 338 community members met planners at 9 community events  
  • Steering committee held 5 meetings  
  • 5 focus group meetings engaging 41 community members 
  • Intentional outreach and participation included:
    • 65 renters at food truck events
    • 11 minority-owned businesses
    • 206 youth at George Washington High school 

Results and Resources

  • Community Input Summary (coming soon)
  • Intentional Engagement Summary(PDF, 4MB)
  • Available in project archive:
    • Meeting presentations, meeting summaries/notes and handouts for public meetings and steering committee meetings
    • Complete listing of neighborhood meetings and community events attended by staff
    • Past project newsletters
    • Links to media articles 
    • Past survey information (full data downloads)
    • Comment logs (collection of all the comments we have received)  
    • Focus Group Meeting Notes and Recordings 

Phase 2: Define the Issues and Develop Initial Recommendations

Phase 2 of the planning process involved further understanding the issues and opportunities that were identified in Phase 1 and asking the community how they should be addressed in the plan.  

What the Planning Team Worked On

  • Hosted meetings, conducted surveys, and attended community events (virtual and in person) to share information and collect input
  • Issues and opportunities analysis
  • Regular meetings with the community steering committee
  • Used multiple channels to get word out about plan launch
    • Project website and email list
    • Social media
    • Traditional media outreach
    • Registered neighborhood organizations and other neighborhood groups
    • Schools
  • Went into the community to get the word out about the plan
    • Virginia Vale/Ellis RNO meeting
    • Indian Creek Neighborhood Association meeting
    • Winston Downs Community Association meeting (w/ Hilltop RNO attending)
    • McMeen Elementary Dia del Niño event
    • McMeen Elementary Multicultural Night
    • Schlessman YMCA pop-up
    • University Hills Spring Market
    • Cook Park Soccer Fields pop-up
    • Shakespeare in the Spring at Cook Park
    • Bible Park Playground pop-up
  • Flyers were distributed at:
    • University Hills Plaza
    • Park Plaza Shopping area
    • Wellshire Plaza
    • Colorado Center (JE Dunn; Stantec; PCL Construction HQs)
    • Shops between Iliff Avenue & Warren Avenue. on E. side of Colorado Blvd.
    • Shopping Center at 1550 S. Colorado Blvd.
    • Century 21 Plaza
    • Square One Center
    • Leetsdale Marketplace Shopping Center
    • Shops at Leetsdale and Monaco (N. side of Leetsdale Drive)
    • Monaco Square
    • Villa Monaco
    • Virginia Village shopping center (NW corner of Florida & Holly) including Unravel Coffee
    • Virginia Shops (SW corner of Florida & Holly) including Sojourners Coffee
    • Holly Shops/Esters Neighborhood Pub
    • South Lowry Marketplace at SE corner of Leetsdale & Quebec
    • Shops at Leetsdale & Oneida
    • Shops at Leetsdale& Holly (N/S of Leetsdale on east side) 

What We Asked the Community

  • Do the draft vision statements reflect the community’s goals for the area?
  • How should Near Southeast grow and what elements of complete neighborhoods should be prioritized to ensure equity in that growth?
  • What affordable housing options should be prioritized?
  • What amenities and services are most desired in the area?
  • Where should mobility safety improvements be prioritized?
  • How can parks, trails, and landscaping better serve the community?
  • How should sustainability and resiliency be incorporated into recommendations?

Key Takeaways

  • Growth should go to appropriate areas and be accompanied by better design, improved mobility, and more community amenities
  • Housing options should be added in neighborhoods when they are appropriately scaled, served by infrastructure, and improve affordability
  • Affordable housing options should be improved for families and those looking to buy, and services for those experiencing homelessness should prioritize providing housing and treatment
  • Desired businesses, like restaurants, local shops, and entertainment options, should be supported through local business associations and other programs
  • Mobility safety should be enhanced with improvements at key intersections and along major corridors
  • Walking and biking networks should have improved connectivity and amenities
  • Landscaping should be improved in parks, streets, and private property to be more sustainable and resilient and provide better habitat for wildlife and pollinators 
  • Reduced water and energy use, reduced heating, and improved air quality should be achieved through a range of actions by individuals, businesses, developers, and the city

See more about what we heard in the Community Input Summary. 

How the Community Participated

  • 260 joined the project’s email list in Phase II (total is 847)
  • 199 attended the community workshops
  • 719 took the online surveys
  • 218 community members met planners at 9 community events
  • Steering committee held 7 meetings
  • 32 participants joined focus group meetings
  • Intentional outreach and participation has been conducted or started with the following partners:
    • African Community Center
    • First Universalist Church
    • Oaks Community Church
    • Renters
    • Schools
    • Latino Community Foundation of Colorado
    • Mexican Cultural Center
    • Denver Islamic Society
    • Celebration Community Church
    • Jewish Family Services
    • Advocacy Denver
    • Ability Specialists, Inc.
    • Denver Disability Law
    • Colorado Cross Disability Coalition

Results and Resources



Phase 1: Understand the Area

Phase 1 of the planning process involved kicking off the project with the community through a variety of virtual and in-person events, raising awareness about the plan and learning how the community views the Near Southeast area and what they would like it to be in the future. 

What the Planning Team Worked On

  • Hosted meetings, conducted surveys, and attended community events (virtual and in person) to share information and collect input
  • Existing conditions research 
  • Convening community steering committee 
  • Used multiple channels to get word out about plan launch 
    • Project website and email list
    • Social media
    • Traditional media outreach
    • Registered neighborhood organizations and other neighborhood groups
    • Schools
  • Went into the community to get the word out about the plan
    • Cook Park Recreation Center
    • Denver Public Library: Virginial Village Branch Library
    • Staenberg-Loup Jewish Community Center
    • Four Mile Historic Park
    • The Sojourners Coffee & Tea
    • Istanbul Café and Bakery
    • Barakah Halal Market
    • Sinclair Gas Station
    • Spyglass Creek
    • Mosaic Apartments
    • Yale Station Senior Apartments
    • Granville Townhomes
    • Denver Kinder Care
    • Little Spark Learning Center
    • Sunflower Hill Child Care
    • Colorado Station RTD Park and Ride
    • Yale Station
    • Ace Hardware

What We Asked the Community

  • What do you like or dislike about your neighborhood?
  • Where are the opportunities?
  • What are the areas of concern?
  • What do you want to see for the future of your neighborhood?
  • How do you want to get involved in the planning process? 

Key Takeaways

  • Desire for improvements to commercial corridors, particularly Evans Avenue, with better design, walkability, and shopping, dining, and entertainment options
  • Better and safer mobility options for all modes
  • More diverse and affordable housing options
  • Preserve and improve parks, trails, green spaces, and landscaping

See more about what we heard in the Community Input Summary (PDF, 1MB)

How the Community Participated

  • 587 joined the project’s email list 
  • 128 attended the Virtual Community Kickoff meeting
  • 523 took the online kickoff map-based survey
  • 228 took the youth-focused survey
  • 331 community members met planners at 9 community events 
  • Steering committee held 4 meetings 
  • 20 community partners participated in stakeholder interviews
  • Intentional outreach and participation has begun with the following partners:
    • Over 288 youth participated across two semesters and 13 classes at George Washington High School 
    • African Community Center
    • Mexican Cultural Center
    • Denver Islamic Center 

Results and Resources


    


Project Archive

Previous Plan Drafts

  • Draft 1 (PDF) - posted for public review November 2022
  • Draft 2 (PDF) - posted for public review February 2023
  • Draft 3(PDF, 99MB) - posted for Planning Board review April 2023
    • The board approved the plan with the condition that the context designation change for these two properties. Watch replay of the April 19 meeting for details. 

Community Meetings, Office Hours and Focus Groups

 The events listed below were organized by the planning team to share information with the community and gather input.

Public Meetings

Community Kickoff (1) 
6-7:15 p.m., Tuesday, July 20, 2021
Virtual meeting via Zoom


Virtual Community Workshop (2) - Land Use and Housing
6-7:30 p.m., Tuesday, March 1, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Virtual Community Workshop (3) - Parks and Mobility
6-7:30 p.m., Thursday, March 10, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Virtual Community Workshop (4)
6-7:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 13, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom


In-person Community Workshop (5)
6-6:30 p.m., Thursday, July 21, 2022
Four Mile Historic Park, 4846 E. Exposition Ave.

Boards:


Targeted Engagement Event
Saturday, July 23, 2022
Frances Weisbart Jacobs Park, 1101 S Quebec St.


Targeted Engagement Event
Thursday, August 18, 2022
The Ramac Apartments, 1640 S Albion St.


Youth Engagement Event
Monday, October 3, 2022
George Washington High School


Youth Engagement Event
Tuesday, October 11, 2022
Rocky Mountain School of Expeditionary Learning


In-person Community Workshop (6)
5:30-7:30 p.m., Tuesday, December 6, 2022
Cook Park Rec Center, 7100 Cherry Creek S Dr., Denver

Boards:


Virtual Community Workshop (7)
6-7:30 p.m., Wednesday, December 14, 2022


Planning Board Public Hearing
3 p.m., Wednesday, April 19, 2023


Land Use, Transportation and Infrastructure Meeting
10:30 a.m., Tuesday, May 2, 2023


City Council Public Hearing 
5:30 p.m., Monday, May 22, 2023
City and County Building, 1437 Bannock St.
Council Chamber (4th floor)




Community Office Hours

  • Wednesday, July 27, 2022, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Cook Park Recreation Center
  • Wednesday, August 3, 2022, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., Staenberg-Loup Jewish Community Center, 350 S. Dahlia Street
  • Wednesday, August 10, 2022, 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., University Hills YMCA, 3901 Yale Avenue
  • Tuesday, August 16, 2022, 10 a.m. to noon, Virginia Village Branch Library, 1500 S. Dahlia St.

Pop-up events 

  • Friday, August 13, 2022, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Four Mile Historic Park
  • Friday, August 13, 2022, 2:30-5 p.m. at Cook Park Pool 
  • Saturday, August 14, 2022, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., University Hills Farmers Market, University Hills Plaza
  • Tuesday, August 24, 2022, 3:30-5:30 p.m., Colorado Station
  • Wednesday, August 25, 2022, 3-5 p.m., Jewish Community Center
  • Saturday, August 28, 2022, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., University Hills Farmers Market, University Hills Plaza 
  • Tuesday, September 7, 2022, 4-6 p.m., Avenir Apartments, 1211 S. Quebec Way
  • Saturday, April 16, 2022, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at University Hills Spring Market, 2500 S. Colorado Blvd.
  • Tuesday, April 26, 2022, 4-6 p.m. at Schlessman YMCA, 3901 E. Yale Ave.
  • Wednesday, January 11, 2023, noon- 2 p.m. at Cook Park Rec Center, 7100 Cherry Creek South Dr.
  • Thursday, January 12, 2023, 4-6 p.m. at Staenberg-Loup Jewish Community Center, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver

Focus Groups and Stakeholder Interviews

Steering Committee Meetings

Steering Committee Meeting 1
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, June 1, 2021
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 2
6-8 p.m., Wednesday, August 11, 2021
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 3
6-8 p.m., September 8, 2021
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 4
6-8 p.m., October 13, 2021
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 5
6-8 p.m., November 10, 2021
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 6
6-8 p.m., December 8, 2021
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 7
6-8 p.m., January 12, 2022
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 8
6-8 p.m., February 9, 2022
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 9
6-8 p.m., April 13, 2022
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 10
6-8 p.m., May 11, 2022
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 11
6-8 p.m., June 8, 2022
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 12
6-8 p.m., August 10, 2022
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 13
6-8 p.m., September 14, 2022
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 14
6-8 p.m., October 12, 2022
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 15
6-8 p.m., November 9, 2022
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 16
6-8 p.m., January 11, 2023
Virtual meeting


Steering Committee Meeting 17
6-8 p.m., Wednesday, February 8
In person: Junction Food Hall


Steering Committee Meeting 18
6-8 p.m., Wednesday, March 8
Colorado Center Tower 3


Steering Committee Meeting 19
6-8 p.m., Wednesday, April 6
Colorado Center Tower 3


Other Neighborhood Meetings and Events

2019

  • 12/7: Council District 1 Town Hall, Cook Park Recreation Center

2020

  • 12/15: University Hills North Community RNO, virtual meeting via Zoom

2021

  • 2/16: Cook Park RNO meeting, virtual meeting via Zoom
  • 6/9: Lynwood Neighborhood Association meeting, virtual meeting via Zoom
  • 7/31: Virginia Village Library Denver Days event
  • 8/3: National Night Out, Cook Park
  • 8/21: South by Southeast, Bible Park
  • 9/14: Virginia Village Ellis Community Association meeting, virtual meeting via Zoom 
  • 10/27: District 4 Town Hall, Hebrew Educational Alliance 

2022

  • 4/12: Virginia Vale Community Association Annual Meeting
  • 4/21: Indian Creek Neighborhood Association Meeting
  • 4/30: Dia del Nino at McMeen Elementary
  • 5/7: Shakespeare in the Park at Cook Park
  • 5/12: McMeen Elementary Multicultural Night
  • 5/25: Winston Downs Community Association Meeting
  • 8/2: National Night Out at Cook Park
  • 8/18: McMeen Elementary Back-to-School Night 
  • 8/20: South by Southeast
  • 10/25: District 4 Town Hall