Near Northwest Area Plan

Latest news

Talk with neighbors about housing, design, preservation, growth and more

City planners have started shaping community feedback into the draft recommendations that will eventually become the Near Northwest Area Plan. They are also identifying key issues that need additional input. If you have weighed in already, great! Here's your chance to stay up on the planning process and see how your comments and ideas have influenced the plan so far. If you haven't, this is a perfect time to get involved and have a say in the future of your Near Northwest neighborhood. 

Over the next few months, we will be talking with community members in Chaffee Park, Jefferson Park, Highland and Sunnyside about growth, housing, preservation, design and more. All participants will get an early check-in on draft recommendations and discuss these key issues. Join us virtually, in person or on your own time! See all options to participate below and take advantage of those that work best for you.

Virtual Workshop: Wednesday, September 21

In-person Neighborhood Workshops: September 29, October 1 and October 5

Additional opportunities to share your voice will be available in the coming weeks. Sign up for the project email list to stay up-to-date.

Help spread the word

Download our flier and share with your neighbors to help us ensure we hear from as many people as possible. 

NNW Outreach Phase 3 Flier

Download bilingual flier(PDF, 1003KB)


View summary of community input

We are grateful to everyone who took the time to join community events, virtual and in-person, and took the online surveys. The planning team has reviewed and analyzed all the input collected during the second phase of planning. Click on the topics below to see key takeaways.

On Land Use and Built Form

  • Offer multiple tools for preserving and celebrating culture in Near Northwest.
  • Develop a package of tools that address concerns and that take into consideration the unique characteristics of each neighborhood.
  • Prioritize preserving existing embedded traditional missing middle housing and find ways to add more missing middle options without sacrificing affordability.
  • Allow/require commercial and/or a mix of uses on busier streets and within existing commercial areas. 
  • Focus on how commercial areas can improve their streetscape and identities.

On Economy and Housing

  • Study space programming within neighborhood commercial areas for the ability to expand outdoor dining and/or have the ability to temporarily close down portions of streets for festivals and outdoor dining expansion.
  • Focus on supporting small businesses, as well as opportunities to train a new workforce and retain and attract jobs.
  • Prioritize keeping residents at risk of displacement in place by looking at a variety of programs. For example, rehabilitation and ability to add density (ADU, second unit, etc.) to build equity.
  • Build more affordable housing and offer ways to prioritize existing and past residents in new housing.
  • Seek opportunities to support various types of temporary housing through key community partnerships.

On Mobility

  • Implementation of infrastructure priorities should focus on:
    • More electric charging (for vehicles and bikes),
    • Completing bike network gaps and focusing on enhanced safety, especially for bike routes that lead to destinations like neighborhood commercial areas, downtown, and parks/rec centers,
    • Including a buffer between cars and sidewalks and making sidewalks wider, especially on busier streets, and
    • Improving intersection safety.
  • Prioritize intersection improvements that lead to major destinations and intersections where two major roadways connect. 
  • Develop recommendations for minor and major corridors, testing feasibility of desired improvements within the right-of-way and defining what, if any, challenges to improvements there are.
  • Minor corridors should focus on pedestrian and bike infrastructure-improvements while major corridors should focus on making existing crossings safer and integrating the bike network. Adding more crossings at interstates and railroads is also a priority.
  • West 38th Avenue should focus on making sidewalks safer and more comfortable to walk along.

On Quality of Life

  • Focus on improving existing park and rec center amenities, as well as adding new ones. There should also be more of a focus on programming within recreation centers, and bilingual offerings should be made available.
  • Consider a multiple action strategy to increase food access through recruitment/retention of a variety of smaller scale healthy grab-and-go and neighborhood food stores and full-service grocery stores, in addition to expanding access to mobile food-co-ops, community kitchens, and community gardens.
  • Address the financial access (and cultural) barriers many residents face in terms of shopping for groceries within the study area at existing stores.
  • Consider creative, sustainable approaches to build more cohesive neighborhoods where all residents have easy ways to become civically engaged and to feel they are part of the community.
  • Increase physical and financial access to community-based healthcare.
  • Build awareness of existing services to community members, including education, job training, and social programs.
  • Provide more affordable childcare services, including before/after school programs.

 

Download full Phase 2 Community Engagement Summary(PDF, 17MB) 


 

 

How to Get Involved

 

 

 


Find us in your neighborhood 

Members of the planning team will be attending the following in-person community events and will be and available to take public input and answer questions.   

  • Neighborhood Workshop: Highland and Jefferson Park
    Thursday, September 29, 5-7:30 p.m.
    CEC Early College, 2650 Eliot St, Denver, CO 80211
  • Neighborhood Workshop: Chaffee Park
    Saturday, October 1, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

    Beach Court Elementary, 4950 Beach Ct, Denver, CO 80211

  • Neighborhood Workshop: Sunnyside
    Wednesday, October 5, 5-7:30 p.m.

    STRIVE Prep - Sunnyside Campus, 4735 N Pecos St, Denver, CO 80211

Hosting a neighborhood meeting or event? Let us know! City planners can provide presentations about the plan, set up a booth and/or provide materials.  


 

 

Area Information and Resources

The Near Northwest Planning Area is made up of the neighborhoods of Chaffee Park, Sunnyside, Highland, and Jefferson Park. It includes a variety of housing types, commercial corridors, local shopping destinations, and industrial areas in the northeastern portion of the planning area.   

Existing conditions

Before public outreach begins, the planning team begins collecting data on the neighborhoods in the planning area to understand the current context. This data includes everything from the demographics of the area and its geography, to how land is being used now, what types of jobs and industries exist in the area and whether residents or businesses are vulnerable to involuntary displacement. This information is collected in the Near Northwest Briefing Book, which is intended to serve as a resource throughout the planning process. 

Issues and opportunities

The Issues and Opportunities Summary together previous community input and existing conditions analysis and to provide a detailed look at the primary issues and opportunities that the public identified in the area.  

 

Current Zoning Context

  • Urban - 46%

  • Urban Edge - 13%

  • Industrial - 11%

  • Urban Center - 11%

  • General Urban - 8%

  • Other (Former Chapter 59, Open Space, Campus Zone Districts) - 11%

Planning Need Indicator Scores

To help inform the neighborhood planning process, the city developed data-based indicators of planning need at the neighborhood scale. 

Each Near Northwest Area neighborhood was scored from low planning need to high planning need in five categories.

Neighborhood Livability Investment Policy & Regulation Economy Demographics
Chaffee Park Medium high Medium low Low Medium Medium low
Sunnyside Medium Medium low Medium Medium Low
Highland Medium Medium high High Medium high Medium
Jefferson Park Medium low Medium Medium high High Medium

  

Read more about the indicators and scoring



Area Statistics and Other Information

Statistics

  • Area: 3.8 square miles
  • 2018 Population: 24,581
  • Housing units: 11,591
Regional destinations
  • Children’s Museum of Denver
  • Downtown Aquarium
Natural features
  • South Platte River
  • Crescent Park
  • Jefferson Park
  • City of Cuernavaca Park
  • Chaffee Park
  • Ciancio Park
Key corridors
  • Speer Boulevard
  • Federal Blvd
  • 32nd Avenue
  • 38th Avenue
  • 44th Avenue
  • Navajo Street
  • Interstate 25
  • Interstate 70


Boundaries

  • North:City limits
  • East:Railroad
  • South:West 29th Avenue, Speer Boulevard and Platte River
  • West: Federal Boulevard 



  


 

  

Process and Timeline

Project Timeline

The Neighborhood Planning Initiative provides a model for area planning that is intentional, equitable and measurable. The planning process is guided by a multi-pronged outreach and communications strategy with an expected timeline of 18 to 24 months from kickoff to adoption. For a detailed overview, visit How We Plan. For details on the planning process is being applied in the Near Northwest Area, see below.   

Planning Process Phases

  • Understand the Area
  • Define the Issues and Develop Initial Recommendations
  • Refine Recommendations
  • Community Review of Draft Plan
  • Adoption Process

Current Phase: Refine Recommendations

What the planning team is working on
  • Finalizing the vision statements
  • Creating draft recommendations and alternatives
  • Continuing to work with the community steering committee
  • Continuing to work with community navigators and local community organizations to reach under represented populations
  • Continuing to spread the word about the planning process
What we're asking the community
  • How can the draft recommendations be improved?
  • Which alternatives do you prefer?
How the public can participate

 


Completed Phases

Phase 2: Define the Issues and Develop Initial Recommendations

Phase 2 was about defining the issues we heard about in phase 1 and identifying solutions through various modes of communication and collaboration. We used online surveys, small group discussions, neighborhood workshops, as well as community navigators, intercept surveys, street campaigns, and short videos.

What the Planning Team Worked On
  • Refined draft vision statements based on community input from Phase 1
  • Confirmed issues and opportunities the plan should address based on community input from Phase 1
  • Collected feedback and developed draft recommendations
  • Continued to work with the community steering committee
  • Continued to spread the word about the planning process
    • 2 Street Campaigns involved visits to more than 40 locations to deliver fliers, stickers, decals and yard signs around area business districts, major streets, schools and neighborhood parks
    • More than 5,000 fliers were delivered to every home by Council District 1 to promote in-person neighborhood workshops
What We Asked the Community
  • What do you think about the draft vision statements?
  • What do you think about the identified issues and opportunities?
  • Are we hearing you right?
Key Themes from Community Input
On Land Use and Built Form
  • Offer multiple tools for preserving and celebrating culture in Near Northwest.
  • Develop a package of tools that address concerns and that take into consideration the unique characteristics of each neighborhood.
  • Prioritize preserving existing embedded traditional missing middle housing and find ways to add more missing middle options without sacrificing affordability.
  • Allow/require commercial and/or a mix of uses on busier streets and within existing commercial areas. 
  • Focus on how commercial areas can improve their streetscape and identities.
On Economy and Housing
  • Study space programming within neighborhood commercial areas for the ability to expand outdoor dining and/or have the ability to temporarily close down portions of streets for festivals and outdoor dining expansion.
  • Focus on supporting small businesses, as well as opportunities to train a new workforce and retain and attract jobs.
  • Prioritize keeping residents at risk of displacement in place by looking at a variety of programs. For example, rehabilitation and ability to add density (ADU, second unit, etc.) to build equity.
  • Build more affordable housing and offer ways to prioritize existing and past residents in new housing.
  • Seek opportunities to support various types of temporary housing through key community partnerships.
On Mobility
  • Implementation of infrastructure priorities should focus on:
    • More electric charging (for vehicles and bikes),
    • Completing bike network gaps and focusing on enhanced safety, especially for bike routes that lead to destinations like neighborhood commercial areas, downtown, and parks/rec centers,
    • Including a buffer between cars and sidewalks and making sidewalks wider, especially on busier streets, and
    • Improving intersection safety.
  • Prioritize intersection improvements that lead to major destinations and intersections where two major roadways connect. 
  • Develop recommendations for minor and major corridors, testing feasibility of desired improvements within the right-of-way and defining what, if any, challenges to improvements there are.
  • Minor corridors should focus on pedestrian and bike infrastructure-improvements while major corridors should focus on making existing crossings safer and integrating the bike network. Adding more crossings at interstates and railroads is also a priority.
  • West 38th Avenue should focus on making sidewalks safer and more comfortable to walk along.
On Quality of Life
  • Focus on improving existing park and rec center amenities, as well as adding new ones. There should also be more of a focus on programming within recreation centers, and bilingual offerings should be made available.
  • Consider a multiple action strategy to increase food access through recruitment/retention of a variety of smaller scale healthy grab-and-go and neighborhood food stores and full-service grocery stores, in addition to expanding access to mobile food-co-ops, community kitchens, and community gardens.
  • Address the financial access (and cultural) barriers many residents face in terms of shopping for groceries within the study area at existing stores.
  • Consider creative, sustainable approaches to build more cohesive neighborhoods where all residents have easy ways to become civically engaged and to feel they are part of the community.
  • Increase physical and financial access to community-based healthcare.
  • Build awareness of existing services to community members, including education, job training, and social programs.
  • Provide more affordable childcare services, including before/after school programs.
How the Community Participated
  • 781 surveys taken
    • 434 via the general online survey
    • 347 via the intercept survey (developed to reach focused populations, including youth)
  • 244 people participated in meetings (in person and virtual)
    • 12 Neighborhood-focused meetings, including 4 online Spanish-only roundtables
    • 10 Topic-based meetings
    • 4 Business group meetings
  • Steering Committee met 5 times
  • Community navigators did 600 hours of work in the community, meeting people at grocery stores, food banks, business districts, schools, churches, and other cultural gathering places
  • 339 new subscribers joined the email list  
Results and Resources
  • Community Engagement Summary(PDF, 17MB)
  • Available in project archive:
    • Meeting materials (presentations, meeting summaries and handouts) for public meetings and steering committee meetings
    • Complete listing of neighborhood meetings and community events attended by staff
    • Past project newsletters 
    • Past survey information 
    • Local media coverage

Phase 1: Understand the Area

Planning for the Near Northwest neighborhoods of Jefferson Park, Highland, Sunnyside, and Chaffee Park began in early summer 2021. Phase I of the planning process involved kicking off the project with the community through a variety of virtual and in-person events, building awareness of the planning process, and hearing from a wide variety of stakeholders about what they liked and disliked about the area, and their ideas for the future.  

What the Planning Team Worked On
  • Refined draft vision statements based on community input from Phase 1
  • Confirmed issues and opportunities the plan should address based on community input from Phase 1
  • Developed draft recommendations and collected feedback
  • Continued to work with the community steering committee
  • Continued to spread the word about the planning process
    • 2 Street Campaigns involved visits to more than 40 locations to deliver fliers, stickers, decals and yard signs around area business districts, major streets, schools and neighborhood parks
    • More than 5,000 fliers were delivered to every home by Council District 1 to promote in-person neighborhood workshops
What We Asked the Community
  • What do you think about the draft vision statements and recommendations?
  • What do you think about the identified issues and opportunities?
  • Are we hearing you right?
Key Themes from Community Input
On Land Use and Built Form
  • Top Likes
    •  Mix of uses and density close to transit and Downtown Denver
    • Architectural variety and Historic and old homes
    • Diversity and culture of the neighborhood, including Chicano and Italian history 
  • Top Dislikes
    •  Scrapes and new construction that is overpriced, poorly built, and out of character and scale with the neighborhood
    • Losing identity and sense of place
  • Top Ideas
    • More Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs)
    • Encourage new builds to look more in character with the neighborhood to modernize but preserve character
    • Incentivize ground floor commercial uses in mixed use buildings (e.g. grocery, ‘bodegas’) and other services that the community has said are important   
On Economy and Housing
  • Top Likes
    • Independent retailers and restaurants and neighborhood-serving retail
    • Former streetcar commercial nodes (like 32nd Ave and 44th Ave)
    • Energetic vibe
  • Top Dislikes
    • Gentrification and long-standing residents being pushed out with housing and property taxes becoming very expensive
    • Older “affordable” housing being torn down and replaced with large expensive new homes
    • Loss of small businesses
  • Top Ideas
    • More services, commercial nodes, entertainment options, particularly in Chaffee Park
    • Preserve local businesses  and less expensive shopping options
    • Maintain existing and create more affordable housing options (inc. ADUs, tiny homes, etc.), including affordable housing interspersed through the community
On Mobility
  • Top Likes
    • Walkable and bikeable to parks, shopping, and schools 
    • Access to Downtown Denver (pedestrian bridge is good)
    • Access to light rail, highways
  • Top Dislikes
    • Dangerous intersections and streets, not safe for pedestrians to use or cross, due to inadequate sidewalks, speeding cars that result in major barriers
    • Inadequate bicycle facilities and transit options
    • Traffic increasing due to density, parking concerns in busy areas
  • Top Ideas
    • Traffic calming, wider sidewalks, and better crossings
    • Transit enhancements (Federal Blvd., 38th Ave, Speer Blvd.), more protected bike lanes
    • Better connection across I-25, I-70 and railroads for pedestrians and cyclists  
On Quality of Life
  • Top Likes
    • Great neighborhood parks (e.g. La Raza Park, Chaffee Park, Hirshorn Park, Jefferson Park) with picnic areas, trees, open space, views of Downtown Denver
    • Open space and Running and biking paths along the river
    • Tree lined neighborhood streets
  • Top Dislikes
    • Lack of space and amenities in parks (bathrooms, sports fields, trash receptacles, seating) with outdated play structures, and recreation centers are dated and inadequate
    • Lack of convenient and affordable grocery store options; Chaffee Park is a food/grocery desert
    • Highway pollution and noise; Drug activity, violence, and gang culture; Property crime (porch pirates, car break ins, bike theft, robberies)
  • Top Ideas
    • More green space and parks, improve access to parks and open space, including dog park; upgrade existing parks with bathrooms, seating, trash receptacles
    • New and better amenities, including Community Center, places for youth to gather, indoor and outdoor pool, sports courts, indoor skate park
    • More food options

Download complete Phase I Community Engagement Summary(PDF, 6MB)

How the Community Participated
  • 781 surveys taken
    • 434 via the general online survey
    • 347 via the intercept survey (developed to reach focused populations, including youth)
  • 244 people participated in meetings (in person and virtual)
    • 12 Neighborhood-focused meetings, including 4 online Spanish-only roundtables
    • 10 Topic-based meetings
    • 4 Business group meetings
  • Steering Committee met 5 times
  • Community navigators did 600 hours of work in the community, meeting people at grocery stores, food banks, business districts, schools, churches, and other cultural gathering places
  • 339 new subscribers joined the email list  
Results and Resources
  • Community Engagement Summary
  • Available in project archive:
    • Meeting materials (presentations, meeting summaries and handouts) for public meetings and steering committee meetings
    • Complete listing of neighborhood meetings and community events attended by staff
    • Past project newsletters 
    • Past survey information 
    • Local media coverage

 

 

 

 


Near Northwest Area Team

Planning is a collaborative, community-driven process facilitated by city staff with the support of City Council offices, partner agencies and guided by a steering committee of residents, local businesses, neighborhood groups, community-serving organizations and other constituencies from every neighborhood in the planning area.

City Planners

Sung Han - Project Manager
Senior City Planner 
sungwon.han@denvergov.org
 

Fernando Abbud - Habla español
Associate City Planner
edson.ibanez@denvergov.org
720-865-3229

City Council Offices

Council District 1
Councilwoman Amanda Sandoval
districtone@denvergov.org

Steering Committee

Members of the steering committee for the Near Northwest Area Plan were selected from the more than 140 community members who submitted the interest form. The group is intended to be a cross-section of the neighborhoods that make up the planning area, including residents, local business owners and property owners. In bringing the group together, the planning team consulted with the Council District 1 office, considered the area’s demographics, and sought out a diversity of interests, experiences and areas of expertise as well as voices from traditionally under-represented communities.

Steering committee members help guide the planning process, support public engagement efforts and help create consensus at key points in the process. Meetings take place the fourth Tuesday of the month. They are open to the public, and meeting materials will be available online after the fact.

Steering Committee meeting information

Name

Neighborhood, affiliations and interests

Ashton Altieri

Lives in Jefferson Park and is a board member of Jefferson Park United Neighbors. Key issues of interest are land use, zoning, and pedestrian and bike mobility.

Ramon C. Bargas

Lives in Sunnyside, is officed in Highland and works throughout the Denver metro area, with a focus on Near Northwest communities. Key issues of interest are building design, safety, green spaces, parks and trees, and serving as a voice for planning in the community and support neighborhood initiatives that preserve cohesive planning, neighborhood maintenance and rejuvenation initiatives and personal connections with neighbors.

 Mike Blake Lives in Jefferson Park and is a member of the Frontview 40 Condominium Association. Key issues of interest are land use and zoning; trees, parks and green space; local businesses and jobs.

Tim Boers

Lives in Highland, is an architect and chair of Highland United Neighbors (HUNI) Planning & Community Development Committee. Key issues of interest are building design, affordable housing, and trees, parks and green space, transportation, and preservation.

Benjamin Chavez

Lives in Jefferson Park. Key issues of interest are involuntary displacement, improving access to opportunity and affordable housing.

Esteban Gomez

Lives in Sunnyside. Key issues of interest are affordable housing, involuntary displacement and improving access to opportunity.

Nita Gonzales

Lives in Chaffee Park and is a trustee for Regis University. Key issues of interest are affordable housing, involuntary displacement and improving access to opportunity.

 Bill Hare Owns a manufacturing business in Sunnyside and Co-Chaired the SUNI PCD Committee for four years. Key issues of interest are expanded green space; 41st Street Station Area redevelopment; and involuntary displacement of both business and residents. 

Tim Hernández

Teaches at North High School and lives just outside the Near Northwest Area in West Highland. Key areas of interest include affordable Housing, anti-displacement, and improving access to opportunity.

Rebecca Hunt

Lives in Highland. Key issues of interest are building design, affordable housing, sustainability, and historic preservation.

Sheila Martinez

Lives in Sunnyside. Key issues of interest are involuntary displacement, improving access to opportunity, building design, and creating a diverse, inclusive, and equitable community.

Renee Martinez-Stone

Works for the West Denver Renaissance Collaborative at Denver Housing Authority (DHA). Lives just outside the Near Northwest Area in West Highlands. Key issues of interest are affordable housing, accessory dwelling units, building design and involuntary displacement.

Nola Miguel

Lives in Chaffee Park and is a member of the Chaffee Park Neighborhood Association. Key issues of interest are involuntary displacement, improving access to opportunity and affordable housing.

Adela Pena 

Long-time resident of the Regis Neighborhood, long-time employee of Leprino Foods Company. Key issues of interest are expanded green space; 41st Street Station Area redevelopment; and involuntary displacement of both business and residents.

Garrett W. Phillips

Lives in Sunnyside and is active in many community organizations including the Denver Elks Lodge in Jefferson Park. Key issues of interest are involuntary displacement, improving access to opportunity and building design.

Lorenzo J. Ramirez

Lives in Highland and operates a cultural arts nonprofit organization in Highland. Key issues of interest are historic neighborhood sites and building preservation, new building design, affordable housing and involuntary displacement of native and long-time residents.

Julie Shimonek 

Lives in Jefferson Park as a renter. Key issues of interest are affordable housing; getting around by walking/rolling, bike or car; traffic issues; and trees, parks, green space, and recreation.

Lexi Steinhauer

Is on the board of a Sunnyside-based non-profit organization, lives and works in Highland, and is a member of Highland United Neighbors Inc. Planning & Community Development committee. Key issues of interest are building design, affordable housing, and trees, parks and green space.

Trupti Suthar

Lives in Sunnyside and is president of Sunnyside United Neighbors Inc. and an at-large board member of Inter-Neighborhood Cooperation. Key areas of interest include development and land use, climate and resiliency and community organizing and empowerment.

Leslie Twarogowski

Is executive director of the Federal Boulevard Business Improvement District in Jefferson Park. Key issues of interest are affordable housing, involuntary displacement, improving access to opportunity, supporting a commercial corridor filled with diverse, locally owned businesses and property owners, and safety for all the ways people get around.

Emily Weiss

Lives in Chaffee Park and is a member of the Chaffee Park Neighborhood Association. Key issues of interest at affordable housing, involuntary displacement, improving access to opportunity, racial justice, environmentalism, and ensuring voices are heard equitably from all community members.

 

 

Consultants, Partner Agencies and Other Organizations

  • Progressive Urban Management Associates - Brad Segal, President
  • Studio Seed - Cheney Bostic, Principal/Owner
  • Colorado Changemakers Collective - Maricruz Herrera, President
  • Grace Herbison, independent consultant - facilitation
  • Studio CPG - Heather Noyes, Principal
  • ALTA Planning & Design - Jennifer Bartlett, Senior Planning Associate
  • ArLand Land Use Economics - Arleen Taniwaki, Principal
  • Ben Kelly, independent consultant - engagement

 

 

 

 


 

 

Project Archive

Community Meetings and Office Hours

Community Kickoff Meeting
Tuesday, July 27, 2021
Virtual meeting via Zoom


Youth Focus Groups at North High School
Thursday and Friday, October 21 and 22, 2022


Virtual Community Discussion on Health and Environment
Tuesday, March 8, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom


Virtual Community Discussion on Industrial Future
Tuesday, March 15, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom


Virtual Community Discussion on Design Character and Preservation
Wednesday, March 16, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom


Virtual Community Discussion on Complete and Green Streets 
Thursday, March 17, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom


Virtual Community Discussion on Affordable Housing and Wealth Building
Wednesday, March 23, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom


Virtual Neighborhood Discussion - Chaffee Park
Thursday, April 21, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom


Neighborhood Workshop - Chaffee Park
Saturday, April 23, 2022
Beach Court Elementary


Neighborhood Workshop - Sunnyside
Wednesday, April 27, 2022
Smedley Elementary


Virtual Neighborhood Discussion - Sunnyside
Thursday, April 28, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom


 Neighborhood Workshop - Highland
Wednesday, May 4, 2022
North High School


Virtual Neighborhood Discussion - Highland
Thursday, May 5, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom


Neighborhood Workshop - Jefferson Park
Wednesday, May 11, 2022
CEC Early College


Virtual Neighborhood Discussion - Jefferson Park
Thursday, May 12, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom


Pop-up Events

  • Saturday, August 21, 10 a.m.-noon, Federal Coffee, 2307 Federal Blvd. 

Steering Committee Meetings

Steering Committee Meeting #1
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, June 29, 2021
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Steering Committee Meeting #2
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, July 20, 2021
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Steering Committee Meeting #3
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, August 24, 2021
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Steering Committee Meeting #4
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, September 28, 2021
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Steering Committee Meeting #5
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, October 26, 2021
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Steering Committee Meeting #6
6-8 p.m., Wednesday, November 10, 2021
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Steering Committee Meeting #7
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, January 25, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Steering Committee Meeting #8
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, February 22, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Steering Committee Meeting #9
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, March 22, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Steering Committee Meeting #10
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, April 26, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Steering Committee Meeting #11
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, April 26, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Steering Committee Meeting #12
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, June 12, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

Steering Committee Meeting #13
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, July 26, 2022
Aztlan Recreation Center – Community Room
Note: Meeting was held in person, so no video recording was done.

 

Steering Committee Meeting #14
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, August 23, 2022
Virtual meeting via Zoom

 

 

Other Neighborhood Meetings and Events

2021

  • 7/15: Registered Neighborhood Organization Leadership meeting
  • 7/22: Quigg Newton Leadership Resident Council
  • 7/28 and 7/31: Sunnyside Conservation Overlay Town Hall
  • 7/29: Sunnyside United Neighbors Inc Quarterly General Membership Meeting and BBQ, 3845 Lipan Street. 
  • 8/5: Jazz in the Park, Chaffee Park
  • 8/6: Movie in the Park, Regis University
  • 8/20: Movie at the Park, Zuni Park
  • 8/21: Coffee Chat at Federal Coffee
  • 8/26: Quigg Newton Leadership Resident Council
  • 9/8: North Side Pride, North High School
  • 9/11: Sunnyside Music Festival, Chaffee Park 
  • 9/14: Back to School Night, North High School
  • 9/16: Back to School Night, Sandoval Elementary
  • 9/17: Back to School Night, CEC Early College
  • 9/18: 3V3 Basketball Tournament, Aztlan Recreation Center, 4435 Navajo St.
  • 9/19: Fun on Federal, 2406 Federal Boulevard
  • 9/26: Jefferson Park United Neighbors Broncos Tailgate
  • 10/6: Registered Neighborhood Organization Leadership meeting
  • 10/13: Bryant Webster Festival de Otoño 
  • 10/21 and 10/22: North High School class engagement (11 classes attended)
  • 10/31: Highland United Neighbors Inc. Halloween Event