Active Safe Streets with Bikeway Projects

Overview

Expanding Denver's bikeway network is critical to achieving Denver's Vision Zero and Denver Moves Everyone's goals. By implementing bikeways, DOTI creates safer streets for everyone – building streets with slower speeds, safer intersections, better connections to transit, and safer conditions for drivers.

DOTI funds and installs bikeways in four different ways – through our RISE and Elevate Bonds, Community Transportation Networks, the Bike Paving program, and the Neighborhood Transportation Management Program.

  • Elevate and RISE General Obligation Bonds – These projects were approved by voters in 2017 (Elevate) and 2021 (RISE) to enhance the city by providing critical improvements to Denver's infrastructure such as roads, sidewalks, parks, recreation centers, libraries, and more.
  • Community Transportation Networks (CTN) – CTN is a bold program aimed at rapidly expanding slow, safe, and comfortable transportation options in your community by providing safer and more comfortable travel options for people who have less access to driving and rely more on walking, bicycling, rolling, and transit to get around Denver.
  • Bike Paving – Annually, DOTI efficiently coordinates the installation of bikeways recommended in the Denver Moves: Bicycles Plan with annual paving activities. DOTI intends to implement bike lanes in coordination with street repaving efforts, which are typically scheduled to occur between April and October each year.
  • Neighborhood Transportation Management Program (NTMP) – DOTI's Neighborhood Transportation Management Program (NTMP) works together with neighborhood residents to establish local transportation priorities, to develop and implement transportation projects that support those priorities, and to help inform the local implementation of citywide mobility and safety programs.

Active Projects Seeking Feedback

Review the active projects seeking feedback below for more information related to status and outreach efforts happening for projects that are currently in design.

  • Sign up for email updates in the sign-up form on this page to be notified about future engagement opportunities/updates for these projects.
  • Share specific project feedback by emailing us at denvermoves@denvergov.org or giving us a call at (720) 865-9378.

W 29th Avenue: Sheridan Boulevard to Zuni Street

Neighborhood(s): Highland, West Highland, Sloan Lake, Jefferson Park

Project Status: Design. Repaving and safety improvements to corridor anticipated Fall 2024

Program: Paving Program

Upcoming Project Outreach: Give feedback on safety improvement options along this corridor at the upcoming open house:

  • Wednesday, July 10, 2024
  • 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
  • Highland Recreation Center - Multipurpose Room
  • 2880 Osceola St, Denver, CO 80212

Safety improvements may include an upgraded bike lane, speed reduction measures, and intersection improvements that will make it safer for all users. Potential safety upgrades could result in on-street parking removal along portions of the corridor.

View the open house boards and corridor alternatives here(PDF, 13MB)

Feedback form

Past Project Outreach: DOTI held a pop-up event at SloHi Bike Co on April 20, 2024 to discuss current conditions along W 29th Avenue. View a summary of feedback received here. DOTI distributed approximately 7,000 mailers and flyers to addresses on and surrounding the corridor ahead of this event, as well as sent an email blast to over 1,300 people. The project team met with Councilwoman Sandoval and notified stakeholders ahead of the pop-up event. 50+ members of the public showed up to the event.

Sign up for email updates to stay informed about this project.


Common Questions:

Q: Will safety improvements be made to the section of W 29th Avenue/15th Street between Zuni Street and Central Street?
A: DOTI will not be making changes to this section in 2024 but plans to revisit this section in 2025.

Q: Why this corridor?
A: W 29th Avenue, from Sheridan Boulevard to Federal Boulevard, is on Denver's High Injury Network, meaning it is one of 5% of Denver's 2,000+ miles of streets where 50% of Denver's traffic crashing resulting in serious injury or death occur. Making this street safer is a priority for Denver. DOTI is repaving this street this year, providing an opportunity to implement safety improvements.

Knox Court: W Alameda Avenue to W 8th Avenue

Neighborhood(s): Barnum, Villa Park

Project Status: Design: Construction Coming Summer 2024

Program: Bike Paving Program

Project Outreach: A pop-up event was held along Lakewood Gulch Trail on April 24, 2024 to discuss current conditions along Knox Court and review the potential design options. Approximately 1,300 mailers and flyers were distributed to addresses surrounding the corridor ahead of this event, as well as an email blast to almost 800 people. The project team met with Councilwoman Torres and notified stakeholders ahead of the pop-up event. The next public outreach event will be in early summer.

Sign up for email updates to stay informed about this project.

W Dartmouth Avenue: Webster Street to Sheridan Boulevard

Neighborhood(s): Bear Valley

Project Status: Design: Construction Coming Summer 2024

Program: Bike Paving Program

Project Outreach: A pop-up event was held at Bear Valley Park on April 30, 2024 to discuss current conditions along Dartmouth Avenue. Approximately 1,400 flyers were distributed to addresses surrounding the corridor ahead of this event, as well as an email blast to over 800 people. The project team met with Councilwoman Flynn and notified stakeholders ahead of the pop-up event. The next public outreach event will be later this summer. 

Sign up for email updates to stay informed about this project.

N Kittredge St: E 53rd Avenue to Green Valley Ranch Blvd

Neighborhood(s): Gateway

Project Status: Design: Construction Coming 2024

Program: Bike Paving Program

Sign up for email updates to stay informed about this project.

2024 Construction Projects

The map below shows the construction status of anticipated 2024 projects. If you'd like to be notified about these projects, please sign up for updates in the sign-up form at the bottom of this page. For specific questions or concerns, reach out to DenverSaferStreets@gmail.com or (720) 865-9378.

Please refresh this page if the map below isn't populating.


West Denver

Neighborhoods Affected: Villa Park, Barnum, Barnum West

W Kentucky Avenue: S Lowell Boulevard to S Federal Boulevard

Neighborhood(s): Westwood

Project Status: Construction Coming Summer 2024

Program: Neighborhood Transportation Management Program (NTMP)

W Ohio Avenue: S Vallejo Street to S Clay Street

Neighborhood(s): Athmar Park

Project Status: Construction Coming Summer 2024

Program: Neighborhood Transportation Management Program (NTMP)

N Perry Street: Bayaud Avenue to W 7th Avenue

Neighborhood(s): Barnum, Barnum West

Project Status: Construction Coming Summer 2024

Program: West Denver Safer Streets

N Tennyson Street/W 7th Avenue: W 12th Avenue to W 7th Avenue to N Perry Street

Neighborhood(s): Villa Park

Project Status: Construction Coming Summer 2024

Program: West Denver Safer Streets

Central Denver

Neighborhoods Affected: Downtown, City Park, City Park West, Clayton, Cole, Five Points, Lincoln Park and Whittier.

7th Avenue: Mariposa Street to Delaware Street

Neighborhood(s): Lincoln Park

Project Status: Construction Coming Winter 2024/Spring 2025

Program: Neighborhood Transportation Management Program (NTMP)

E 21st Avenue: Franklin Street to York Street

Neighborhood(s): City Park West

Project Status: This neighborhood bikeway will include pedestrian safety improvements such as curb extensions to shorten crossing distances as well as traffic calming elements that slow down vehicle speeds such as traffic circles, diverters, and pinch points

Program: Central Denver CTN

E 26th Avenue: N Vine Street to N Josephine Street

Neighborhood(s): Whittier, Skyland

Project Status: This project includes a protected bike lane that will create a safe space for people bicycling, provide enhanced safety at intersections, and encourage slower vehicle speeds. The project also improves visibility for crossing pedestrians, and shortens crossing distances for people walking as well.

Program: Central Denver CTN

E 28th Avenue: Glenarm Place to N Vine Street

Neighborhood(s): Whittier

Project Status: This project includes a protected bike lane from Glenarm Pl to N Williams St that will create a safe space for people bicycling, provide enhanced safety at intersections, and encourage slower vehicle speeds. It also includes a neighborhood bikeway from N Williams St to N Vine St, which includes pedestrian safety improvements like curb extensions and pedestrian refuge islands to shorten crossing distances.

Program: Central Denver CTN

E 29th Avenue/N Franklin Street: E 28th Avenue to N Williams St

Neighborhood(s): Whittier

Project Status: This neighborhood bikeway will include pedestrian safety improvements such as curb extensions to shorten crossing distances.

Program: Central Denver CTN

Market Street: 14th Street to 17th Street

Neighborhood(s): Five Points

Project Status: This project includes a protected bike lane (PBL) from 14th St to the existing PBL at 17th St adding to a safe space for people bicycling, provide enhanced safety at intersections for people walking, and encourage slower vehicle speeds. The project also incorporates a bus only lane on Market St starting south of Speer Blvd and continues to 17th Street.

Program: Central Denver CTN

Tremont Place/24th Street/Glenarm Place: E 20th Avenue to 26th Street

Neighborhood(s): Five Points

Project Status: This neighborhood bikeway will include pedestrian safety improvements such as curb extensions and pedestrian refuge islands to shorten crossing distances, as well as traffic calming elements that slow down vehicle speeds such as pinch points and diverters.

Program: Central Denver CTN

N Williams Street: E 21st Avenue to E 31st Avenue

Neighborhood(s): Whittier, City Park West

Project Status: This neighborhood bikeway will include pedestrian safety improvements such as curb extensions to shorten crossing distances; traffic calming elements that slow down vehicle speeds, such as traffic circles and pinch points; and a bike box to enhance safety for bicyclists at the intersection of Williams St and E 31st Ave.

Program: Central Denver CTN

South Central Denver

Neighborhoods Affected: West Washington Park

E Virginia Ave / E Dakota Ave: S Broadway St to S Marion St Pkwy

Neighborhood(s): West Washington Park

Project Status: The project includes a bike lane on E Virginia Ave that will create a safe space for people bicycling, provide enhanced safety at intersections, and encourage slower vehicle speeds. It also includes a neighborhood bikeway on S Sherman St and E Dakota St, which includes pedestrian safety improvements like curb extensions to shorten crossing distances and traffic calming elements that reduce vehicle speeds and volumes such as traffic circles and diverter.

Program: South Central Denver CTN

East Denver

Neighborhoods Affected: University Hills, Montbello, Northeast Park Hill, North Park Hill, South Park Hill, Montclair, Hilltop and Washington Virginia Vale

S Birch Street: E Colorado Center Drive to E Iliff Avenue

Neighborhood(s): University Hills

Project Status: This neighborhood bikeway will include pedestrian safety improvements such as curb extensions to shorten crossing distances as well as traffic calming that will slow down vehicle speeds

Program: South Central Denver CTN

Green Valley Ranch Boulevard: Pena Boulevard to Tower Road

Neighborhood(s): Gateway, Green Valley Ranch

Project Status: Construction Coming Winter 2024/Spring 2025

Program: Neighborhood Transportation Management Program (NTMP)

Kearney Street/Krameria Street: E Virginia Avenue to E Smith Road

Neighborhood(s): Northeast Park Hill, North Park Hill, South Park Hill, Montclair, Hilltop, Washington Virginia Vale

Project Status: This neighborhood bikeway will include pedestrian safety improvements such as curb extensions and pedestrian islands to shorten crossing distances, as was as flashing lights to make it easier for people walking to cross busy streets. The project will also include traffic calming that will slow down vehicle speeds, as well as a bike box to enhance safety for bicyclists at the intersection of Krameria St and E 8th Ave.

Program: Central Denver CTN and South Central Denver CTN

N Uvalda Street: Maxwell Place to E 51st Avenue

Neighborhood(s): Montbello

Project Status:

  • From Maxwell Pl to 51st Ave: Construction has begun!
  • From Maxwell Pl to 56th Ave: Construction Coming Fall 2024

Program: Bike Paving Program

Future Construction Projects

Review the Future Construction Projects table below for projects that are anticipated for construction in 2025 and beyond. Please note that construction dates are subject to change and the timelines below are estimates. For those projects that are not noted as "Design," DOTI shared multiple initial designs for these projects with the community for feedback, and the DOTI project team is now actively seeking funding for construction. If you'd like to be notified about these projects, please sign up for email updates in the sign-up form on this page. For Community Transportation Networks (CTN) projects, check the box(es) for CTN area(s) you're interested in learning about, which are listed next to each project below. You can contact the project teams for these projects by emailing us at Bikes@denvergov.org or giving us a call at (720) 865-9378.

Corridor Neighborhood(s) Project Status Program
W 29th Ave: Zuni St to Central St Highland, Union Station Design: Construction anticipated 2025 Bike Paving Program
Bruce Randolph Ave: Downing St to Colorado Blvd Cole, Clayton Construction anticipated 2025 Central Denver CTN
Bruce Randolph Ave: N Steele St to N Colorado Blvd Clayton, Northeast Park Hill Construction Ready. Seeking Funding. Central Denver CTN
15th St: Larimer St to Central Central Business District Construction anticipated 2025 Central Denver CTN
Delgany St: Wewatta Way to 29th St Five Points Construction Ready. Seeking Funding. Central Denver CTN
15th St: Colfax Ave to Cleveland Pl Central Business District Design Central Denver CTN
Marion St: E 36th Ave to 21st Ave Whittier, Cole Construction Ready. Seeking Funding. Central Denver CTN
Vine St (formerly Gaylord):Bruce Randolph to 21st Ave Whittier, Cole Construction Ready. Seeking Funding. Central Denver CTN
7th St: Auraria Pkwy to Curtis St Auraria Construction Ready. Seeking Funding. Central Denver CTN
N Washington: E 52nd Ave to E 47th Ave Globeville Construction anticipated 2025 National Western Center
N Tejon St (or parallel corridor):W 46th Ave to W 32nd Ave Sunnyside, West Highland Design Northwest Denver CTN
N Lowell Blvd / Meade St: W 46th Ave to W 52nd Ave Regis, Berkeley Design; Construction anticipated 2025 Northwest Denver CTN
W Dunkeld Pl: W 32nd Ave to W 29th Ave Highland Design; Construction anticipated 2025 Northwest Denver CTN
S Tejon St: W Tennessee Ave to W Bayaud Ave Valverde, Athmar Park Construction anticipated 2025 West Denver Safer Streets
W Virginia Ave: S Knox to S Lipan St Westwood, Athmar Park Construction anticipated 2025 West Denver Safer Streets
W Tennessee Ave: W Ohio Ave to S Lipan St Athmar Park Construction anticipated 2025 West Denver Safer Streets
S Irving St: W Kentucky Ave to W Amherst Ave Westwood, Mar Lee, Harvey Park, Harvey Park South Construction anticipated 2025 West Denver Safer Streets
N Tennyson St: Lakewood Gulch to W 17th Ave West Colfax Construction anticipated 2026 West Denver Safer Streets
W Bates Ave: Lamar St to Raleigh St Bear Valley Construction anticipated 2026 West Denver Safer Streets
E 12th Ave: N Madison to Monaco St Pkwy Montclair, Hale, Congress Park

From N Madison to Quebec St: Construction anticipated 2025

From Quebec St to Monaco St Pkwy: Construction anticipated 2027

South Central Denver CTN
E 2nd Ave / N Clarkson St: Washington St to Emerson St Alamo Placita Construction anticipated 2025 South Central Denver CTN
E 2nd Ave / W 2nd Ave: N Galapago St to Washington St Baker, La Alma, Lincoln Park Construction anticipated 2025 South Central Denver CTN
N Shoshone St / 5th Ave: Curtis St to W 13th Ave Baker, La Alma, Lincoln Park Construction Ready. Seeking Funding. South Central Denver CTN
N Emerson St / N Pearl St: E 3rd Ave to E 20th Ave Capitol Hill Construction anticipated 2025 South Central Denver CTN
N Sherman St / E 20th Ave: E Colfax Ave to 19th St Capitol Hill Construction anticipated 2025 South Central Denver CTN
E 3rd Ave: N Emerson St to N Gilpin St Country Club Construction Ready. Seeking Funding. South Central Denver CTN
N Delaware St / W 5th Ave: N Bannock St to W 9th Ave Golden Triangle Construction Ready. Seeking Funding. South Central Denver CTN
E Florida Ave / S Acoma St: Iowa Underpass to S Corona St Platt Park Construction Ready. Seeking Funding. South Central Denver CTN
S Sherman St: E Mississippi Ave to E Yale Ave Platt Park, Rosedale Construction anticipated 2025 South Central Denver CTN
S Franklin St: Buchtel Blvd to E Dartmouth St University, Platt Park, Rosedale Construction anticipated 2026 South Central Denver CTN
W Mississippi Ave / S Logan St: S Sherman St to E Kentucky Ave West Washington Park, Platt Park Construction anticipated 2025 South Center Denver CTN

Frequently Asked Questions

Community Transportation Networks: Construction FAQ including sections on Process, Painted Bike Lanes, Neighborhood Bikeways, and General.

Process

Who is DOTI and what is DOTI’s role in Denver?

The Denver Department of Transportation and Infrastructure (DOTI) plans, designs, and builds the City’s infrastructure. DOTI also operates, maintains, and regulates infrastructure elements within the public right of way. Infrastructure is grouped into two core functions — utilities and mobility. Utilities deliver our City’s water and waste, as well as Denver’s green infrastructure and services. Mobility delivers transportation infrastructure, services, and initiatives for all travelers, which includes pedestrians, bicyclists, transit riders, commercial vehicles, and drivers. Together, DOTI is responsible for most things transportation related within the public right of way — or all the public space between private property lines.

DOTI is not responsible for Denver’s interstate highways (such as I-25 or I-70) or state roadways; the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) is responsible for those roadways. In addition, DOTI does not operate regional transit in Denver, such as bus or rail service; those transit services are operated by the Regional Transportation District (RTD).

What is the Community Transportation Network process?

The Community Transportation Network (CTN) process is a strategy to provide more transportation options for all Denverites, and safer, more efficient ways to move around town.  The CTN process first completed design concepts for priority corridors and conducted community outreach to verify the ideas aligned with community values.  Designs were then advanced and finalized after additional community input. 

Construction for the first wave of corridors is starting in Fall 2022, and this first package of projects will be completed by Winter 2023.  DOTI will then start construction of the second package of projects after the first set is complete.

More information on the CTN process and construction can be found on DOTI’s CTN website

To review the first package of CTN construction projects, view this map.

Where can I find the construction schedule for CTN projects?

Construction schedules are available on DOTI’s Community Transportation Network webpage.  To find the construction schedule for a specific corridor, click the link for the corridor’s Community Transportation Network (Northwest, Central or South Central) at the top of the webpage, and then scroll down to the Construction Projects tab to see the Project Status. The Project Status column will be updated as construction begins and then again once construction is completed.

How does the Community Transportation Network process relate to the city’s bike lane implementation plans?

The Community Transportation Network process supports implementation of the city’s bike plan, Denver Moves: Bikes, and the city’s commitment to building 125 miles of bikeways by the end of 2023.  The city has prioritized the Northwest, Central, and South Central areas of the city for a significant buildout of Denver’s bike network.  By focusing on the city’s core where population densities are higher, our city will significantly increase the number of households within ¼ mile of a high comfort bikeway, which is a primary goal of the Denver Moves: Bikes Plan.

How were these projects funded/selected?

Denver residents decided on a vision for the city’s complete bikeway network in 2011 (Denver Moves: Bikes). In 2019, the citywide outreach process for the City’s land use and transportation plan, Blueprint Denver, confirmed this bicycle network.  These plans outline where and what types of bikeways Denver should install to create a complete, connected, safe, and comfortable bikeway system in Denver, providing a low-cost, healthy, and environmentally friendly transportation option for all residents, including those who don’t own a car.

How is the type of bikeway selected for each corridor?

DOTI uses its Bikeway Design Manual to identify the appropriate bikeway type for any given street in Denver.  The Manual provides engineering criteria for facility (bikeway type) selection based on variables like amount of vehicle traffic, number of traffic lanes, and vehicle speeds. These criteria represent a data-driven approach to bikeway facility selection that prioritizes the safety of bicyclists.  Through the planning and design process, DOTI determines whether the bikeway facility proposed in Denver Moves Bikes (2011, with subsequent plan updates) aligns with the facility type criteria outlined in the design manual.

What was the community engagement process for selecting this bikeway?

Building Denver’s complete bikeway network reflects more than a decade of work, involving thousands of community members that have helped to shape the vision for a better bicycling experience in Denver.  Through Denver Moves Bikes, which DOTI completed in 2011, community feedback helped to shape where and what type of bikeways were needed to create a complete bicycling network, with the goal to make bicycling a safe, comfortable, and convenient option for all types of trips in Denver.  Then in 2015, DOTI updated Denver Moves Bikes to reflect enhancements to the state of the practice of urban bikeway design.  

Starting in 2020, each Community Transportation Network (Northwest, Central, and South Central), led focused virtual community meetings, distributed public surveys, met with community leaders, presented to Registered Neighborhood Organizations, held virtual office hours, and more to identify community priorities along the identified bikeway corridors and gather community feedback on concept and more advanced corridor designs. During each stage of outreach, DOTI collected feedback and updated the bikeway designs to best reflect community values and design standards.

In addition to community engagement, how did the City use feedback from other planning efforts to inform this one?

Community Transportation Networks align with the community’s twenty-year vision to create a better bicycling experience in Denver, building on the work of Blueprint Denver, Neighborhood Area PlansNeighborhood Transportation Management Plans, Comprehensive Plan 2040, and other projects that value safety, connectivity and transportation choice.  DOTI continues to work closely Denverites to refine priorities and projects.

Has DOTI counted amount of bicyclists that ride along the corridor and is there enough demand to justify bike lanes?

Yes, bicycle counts have been conducted. However, bicycle counts are not prerequisite for the installation of a bikeway.  National and local studies (summarized here) consistently show that when space on the roadway is designated for people on bikes, it is used. Additionally, cities with the most miles of bikeways, all things equal, exhibit the lowest rates of all crashes. 

Furthermore, research indicates that drivers too prefer streets that are designed with space for bicyclists, as it creates more predictability for everyone, helping to reduce stress while travelling for all (Transportation Research, 2016).  Building out a network of bikeways therefore benefits all roadway users, even those who choose not to bicycle.

Who can travel in a bike lane?

Anyone on a bicycle, electric bicycle, or electric scooter (including those riding a Lyft or Lime scooter) are able ride in a bike lane.

I'm a bicyclist, and I feel safe riding on this street. Can you explain to me, if I feel safe, why these changes are needed?

Denver has a citywide goal is to increase the number of people bicycling, especially those who do not bicycle today because they don’t feel comfortable doing so.  These “interested but concerned” riders, are the target audience for the expansion of Denver’s bikeway network by 125 miles in 5-years.

Research of metro-Denverites indicated that only about 16% of people feel comfortable riding on Denver’s streets today; the majority of people (59%) would bicycle, but only if safe, convenient bikeways are provided.  Expanding bicycle infrastructure is intended to serve the 59% of bicyclists.

A graph showing the four types of bicyclists in Denver: Highly Confident Bicyclists (4% of all bicyclists); Somewhat Confident Bicyclists (12%); Interested but Concerned Bicyclists (59%); No Way, No How (25%)

I'm never going to bicycle, and I don’t want these improvements on my street. Can’t you implement this project somewhere else?

Denver’s streets, which are owned and operated by the Denver Department of Transportation and Infrastructure (DOTI), are the travel ways that connect our community, and are not intended to benefit one neighborhood or group of people. We frequently call streets “our streets,” or ”our parking,” but these titles overlook how streets are Denver’s largest public space, and are not owned by individuals.

Streets are a public good, which provide benefits to people beyond those who live on a particular street. It is DOTI’s responsibility to asses the use of this public good, and ensure that the highest -and-best use is maintained. Blueprint Denver and the Denver’s Mobility Plans, including Denver Moves: Bicycles, represent the vision thousands of people have provided for how places and streets should be planned and designed to operate for all Denverites.

What types of bikeways will DOTI build through the Community Transportation Networks?

The four types of bikeways that DOTI will build through CTN are: protected bike lanes, buffered bike lanes, neighborhood bikeways, and bike lanes.  Both protected bike lanes and neighborhood bikeways are considered high-comfort bikeways, with protected bike lanes including physical separation from vehicle traffic and neighborhood bikeways including design elements that slow traffic and prioritize bicycle and pedestrian travel.  Moderate comfort bikeways include buffered bike lanes and bike lanes, which are designed in certain situations where higher-comfort bikeways are not feasible due to roadway widths or other considerations.  Lastly, DOTI is currently working to upgrade “signed route/shared lanes” that are marked on our bike map to the four other types of bikeways so they are safer and more comfortable for bicyclists.

To attract new riders to Denver’s bikeway network, it is important to build the most comfortable bikeways possible.  Bicyclists are typically grouped into four categories: Highly Confident, Somewhat Confident, Interested but Concerned, and No Way/No How.  Research of metro-Denverites indicated that only about 16% of people fit into the Highly Confident and Somewhat Confident categories today, while the majority of people (59%) would bicycle, but only if safe, convenient bikeways are provided.  Expanding bicycle infrastructure with high-comfort facilities is intended to serve this majority of bicyclists.

A graph showing the four types of bicyclists in Denver: Highly Confident Bicyclists (4% of all bicyclists); Somewhat Confident Bicyclists (12%); Interested but Concerned Bicyclists (59%); No Way, No How (25%)

Painted Bike Lanes (Bike Lanes, Buffered Bike Lanes, Protected Bike Lanes)

What are bike lanes?

Bike lanes are dedicated bikeways on streets that separate a person bicycling from motor vehicles with a striped line.  Bike lanes run next to curbs or vehicle parking. DOTI’s bikeway design also includes improvements at intersections that slow down vehicle traffic, make pedestrian crossings shorter and safer, and make it easier for all street users to see on-coming traffic at intersections, improving street safety for all. 

A bike lane with a white stripe separating the bicyclist from the roadway is seen below:

A bicyclist riding on a bike lane with a white stripe separating the bicyclist from the roadway.

What are buffered bike lanes?

Buffered bike lanes are dedicated bikeways on streets that separate a person bicycling from motor vehicles with a striped line and physical separation between a person bicycling and where vehicles drive.  Buffered bike lanes better organize the roadway so that people who ride bikes have a wider space to travel within, and drivers have more buffer between their cars and bicyclists, which helps to reduce the stress of driving next to bicyclists.  DOTI’s bikeway design also includes improvements at intersections that slow down vehicle traffic, make pedestrian crossings shorter and safer, and make it easier for all street users to see on-coming traffic at intersections, improving street safety for all.

A buffered bike lane, with physical separation between the bikeway and the road is shown below:

Bicyclists riding on a buffered bike lane with physical separation between the bikeway and the roadway.

What are protected bike lanes?

Protected bike lanes are dedicated bikeways on streets that have both a horizontal and vertical buffer between a person bicycling and motor vehicles and are typically built on busier streets with higher speed limits.  A horizontal buffer is separated space between the bikeway and the roadway (typically at least three feet of space), and a vertical buffer includes either plastic bollards and rubber curbs or concrete barriers that provide a physical barrier between bicyclists and vehicles.

The image below shows a protected bike lane with plastic bollards and rubber curbs.

A protected bike lane with plastic bollards and rubber curbs providing physical separation between the bikeway and the roadway.

These facilities better organize the roadway so that people who ride bikes or scooters have dedicated space to travel safely.  DOTI’s bikeway design also includes improvements at intersections that slow down vehicle traffic, make pedestrian crossings shorter and safer, and make it easier for all street users to see on-coming traffic at intersections, improving street safety for all.

Why is a protected bike lane considered high comfort?

A high comfort bikeway provides a more comfortable ride for people of all skill levels on a bicycle through a variety of potential safety measures, including space to design safer intersections, crossing prioritization for bicyclists at intersections with stoplights, and vertical barriers between bikes and cars that reduce stress for bicyclists.

A high comfort bikeway is where you and your family would feel comfortable riding your bike, which means that you have space and freedom to get where you need to go.  There are criteria for maximum speed and traffic volumes which dictate where high comfort bikeways are installed.

Will this project make traffic worse?

DOTI studies each roadway carefully, and the improvements are designed to maximize safety and meet DOTI’s engineering standards. For example, DOTI has criteria that dictates how many lanes are required for a particular volume of vehicular traffic to ensure that changes do not cause large travel delays.  Overall, there is not always enough street space to accommodate all street uses , which requires tradeoffs. 

People walking and bicycling in Denver are heavily over-represented in serious injuries and fatalities occurring on our streets – making these street users more vulnerable and at greater potential risk when travelling.  With safety as DOTI’s top priority, street features such as parking, curbside use, turn lanes, or travel lanes may need to be repurposed to improve safety for the most vulnerable road users. 

Read more about the City’s Vision Zero program here.

Why did you remove on-street parking in front of my house/on my block?

DOTI collects street parking data when considering whether to change where and when on-street parking is allowed.  DOTI does this by counting the number of vehicles parked on each block, when anticipated use is the highest.  For example, for residential areas this means counting at 5am when most vehicles are parked overnight.  For commercial areas with an active night life, a Friday evening count captures the highest use.  If a street has a combination of uses, DOTI collects parking data during multiple periods.  For each corridor, DOTI develops a tailored approach to parking data collection to provide a broad understanding of parking use.  Once the count is complete, DOTI calculates the available parking supply and occupancy rate, and uses the results of this data collection to inform the street design.

Once parking use data is collected, DOTI also considers the availability of driveways/garages and side street parking, the needs of all road users, land use context, and the presence of businesses or institutional uses (like schools or parks).  Overall – it is DOTI’s responsibility to program the highest and best use of the public-right-of-way in order to create the safest street for all who use it.  In some instances, removing or reducing parking is necessary to create a safer street for all.

What if I or someone who lives in my house has a disability and has no choice but to park on the street?

If a resident needs accessible parking on the street, please read more about the Program (link here). If you believe you meet the Program criteria, you can apply for an ADA parking space (accessibleparking@denvergov.org) so that DOTI engineers can plan for and accommodate the ADA space curbside need in the project design.  DOTI also incorporates any existing ADA parking spaces into bikeway designs, so residents can maintain access to these spaces.

What if I will need on-street parking space for future regular (e.g., landscaping) or one-time (home renovation) use?

If you or your business has regular (landscapers, for example) or one-time (home renovation, for example) additional parking needs, those needs should be met using driveway parking, side street parking, or as a last resort, by applying for a permit to close the bike lane (see DOTI’s Right of Way Permit website for more information).  It is not legal to park or load a vehicle in any designated bikeway.  Vehicles parked or loading are liable for tickets and towing.  Once the bikeway is installed, street users are to obey all existing and new parking signs.

I place my trash in the parking lane in front of my house. Once parking is removed, where should I place my trash?

Property owners should place their trash and waste bins in the buffer space (diagonally striped space between the bike lane and the vehicle lane/parking lane), or in the parking lane.  Please do not block the bike lane with your trash.

For corridors with parking removal, where will my visitors park?

Your visitors can park on any adjacent side street where parking is permitted.

Will commercial traffic get ticketed for parking in a bike lane?

The enforcement of parking restrictions and rules is performed by the City’s Right of Way Enforcement team.  Owners of parked vehicles are responsible for following posted on-street parking allowances.  Elements are being included in the corridor concept designs to discourage illegal parking.


Neighborhood Bikeways

What is a Neighborhood Bikeway?

Neighborhood Bikeways are low-volume, low-speed streets designed to prioritize people who are biking, walking, and rolling using design elements such as signage, pavement markings, speed and/or volume reduction features, and crossing improvements.  DOTI’s bikeway design also includes improvements at intersections that slow down vehicle traffic, make pedestrian crossings shorter and safer, and make it easier for all street users to see on-coming traffic at intersections, improving street safety for all.

Neighborhood bikeways are also sometimes called bicycle boulevards or neighborhood greenways.  Neighborhood bikeways are most commonly installed along local streets, since these streets typically have less, slower moving traffic.  The design elements of neighborhood bikeways are intended to make the street into a safer place for people to walk and bike, while still allowing local vehicle traffic to access homes and businesses.

Neighborhood bikeways include two primary design elements intended to make streets safer for people – these include:

  • Slowing Vehicles Down: On streets where vehicle traffic speeds are already slow, DOTI does not need to implement streets designs to further slow speeds.  However, on streets where travel speeds are higher than is deemed safe for a neighborhood bikeway, DOTI will implement street designs that are effective at slowing vehicle traffic down to the target speeds.
  • Reducing Cut-Through Traffic: On streets where traffic levels are low, DOTI does not need to implement street designs that reduce the amount of cut-through traffic.  However, on streets where traffic levels are higher than is deemed safe for a neighborhood bikeway, DOTI will implement street designs that are effective at reducing the amount of cut-through traffic.  These changes to the street still enable people who live and work on the street to access their homes and businesses, and deliveries can still be made.  The changes are primarily made to make cut through trips inconvenient, motivating these people to find an alternative route.

Watch this video and see our Neighborhood Bikeway website for more information about neighborhood bikeways in Denver.

Why are you installing traffic circles at some intersections along neighborhood bikeways?

Traffic circles at intersections are intended to slow down traffic and make the street feel safer for everyone, including those who are bicycling or walking with children or those who are less comfortable bicycling in mixed traffic.  We are installing intersection treatments at many intersections along neighborhood bikeways, but they are not all traffic circles.  The type of treatment we are installing depends on whether there are existing stop signs, if it's a crossing with a bigger street or smaller street, and the distance between that intersection and other treatments designed to slow down vehicles.

Do traffic circles and bumpouts along neighborhood bikeways remove parking near intersections?

DOTI’s intersection improvements, such as traffic circles and bumpouts, are designed to both reinforce an existing parking ordinance (No. 54-458) regarding how close you allowed to park to any Denver intersection (20' from a stop sign or crosswalk) and provides additional distance for people driving, bicycling, and walking to see each other and navigate the traffic circle.  This ensures people walking, bicycling, or driving have more time to react to each other.

Why is a neighborhood bikeway considered high comfort?

A high comfort bikeway provides a more comfortable ride for people of all skill levels on a bicycle, and greater predictability for all roadway users, compared to traditional bike lanes or “sharrow” streets.  

A high comfort bikeway is where you and your family would feel comfortable riding your bike, which means that you have space and freedom to get where you need to go.  There are criteria for maximum speed and traffic volumes which dictate where high comfort bikeways are installed.  Traffic calming and speed reduction measures are taken to make the high comfort bikeway safer and more comfortable.

Some neighborhood bikeways do not feel high-comfort to me. What makes them qualify as high-comfort?

As we’ve been building out Denver’s bikeway network, we’ve modified our design standards quite a bit as we’ve learned what worked well and what didn’t on our older bikeway installations. Neighborhood bikeways are no exception. Over the past few years, we’ve updated our Bicycle Design Manual to include enhanced safety improvements and traffic calming elements at more frequent intervals as a standard piece of our neighborhood bikeways. We actually have very few neighborhood bikeways today that are up to this standard, and plan on building more of these higher-quality neighborhood bikeways starting in 2023 as our standard practice.

We’re also currently working on a study that will evaluate how our high-comfort bikeways are working, what the public thinks about them, and will recommend improvements to make our high-comfort bikeways even better for people bicycling.


General

How are bikeway projects funded?

In Denver, transportation is primarily funded by property taxes, general fund transfers, grants from state and regional agencies, and bond programs approved by voters.  Fuel taxes and vehicle registration fees primarily fund statewide improvements.  The share of these revenues distributed to the city account for just 7% of the citywide Capital Improvement Fund, and only a portion of those dollars are used to fund transportation improvements in Denver.  The average residential property owner in Denver contributes $50 a year in property taxes that directly support DOTI’s transportation projects (CCD, 2021).  See the figure below for more information on annual funding sources for Denver’s transportation projects.

A pie chart showing Denver’s transportation funding sources between 2017 and 2022: 40% from Capital Improvement Funds, 22% from General Funds, 19% from State and Federal Grants, and 19% Bond Funds

How will this project improve safety?

Safety is our number one priority! Research from cities across the U.S. (including Denver) demonstrates that cities with more high-quality bike infrastructure have 44% fewer traffic deaths and injuries overall (Streetsblog.org).  In addition to enhanced bikeways, these improvements will include other types of transportation safety features where possible: intersection improvements, safer pedestrian crossings and other ways to get us closer to zero traffic related fatalities and serious injuries.

When bike lanes are installed, the vehicular travel lanes are visually narrowed (i.e. , feel narrower to a person driving). This helps slow drivers down and contributes to safety.  Other design elements (including improved pedestrian crossings and “daylighting” – increasing visibility turning to and from side streets by pulling parking back from intersections) also slow vehicle traffic, improve visibility, or both.  Additionally, Denver has a Vision Zero Action Plan with a goal of eliminating all traffic-related deaths and serious injuries on Denver’s roadways by 2030.  As part of Denver’s Vision Zero efforts, DOTI is conducting a city-wide speed mitigation study to identify streets where the posted speed limit can be lowered.  These bike paving corridors may be evaluated and selected for speed reduction during this process.

How will this project improve safety at intersections?

DOTI studies each intersection carefully, and the improvements are designed to maximize safety and satisfy specific design guidelines.  For example, the DOTI has criteria that dictates when turn lanes can be repurposed based on vehicle traffic volume to ensure removal does not cause large travel delays.  Overall, there is not always enough right-of-way to accommodate all street uses safely, which leads to tradeoffs.  With safety as a design priority, it may mean that street features such as parking, curbside use, or turn lanes may need to be repurposed to improve safety for the most vulnerable road users.

Who will maintain these bikeways?

The Department of Transportation and Infrastructure will maintain the bikeways, including snow removal for protected bike lanes and debris removal.

How will the city enforce bicycle traffic laws, such as speeding e-bikes and failing to obey stop signs?

The enforcement of traffic laws is handled by the Denver Police Department. People on bikes are responsible for following posted speed limits and traffic laws.  Colorado also recently passed the Colorado Safety Stop, which gives people on bikes and other “low speed conveyances” the legal option to ride slowly through stop signs without stopping first, as long as they are yielding right of way to pedestrians and other road users who have the right-of-way.  You can read more about this new traffic law here.

Have the impacts to school drop-off zones along the corridor been considered?

Yes, where school drop-off zones are present along the study corridors, DOTI planners and designers are working with school facilities and administration staff to design a roadway that accommodates school needs and is safe for all roadway users.

CTN Benefits and Outreach History

Benefits of Community Transportation Network Projects

  • Create More Equitable Transportation Options: Provide safer and more comfortable travel options for people who have less access to driving and rely more on walking, bicycling, rolling, and transit to get around Denver.
  • Safety, Traffic Calming, and Comfort: Street changes that improve safety at intersections, slow traffic throughout each corridor, and improve comfort for people of all ages and abilities who travel along these streets.
  • Wayfinding and Connectivity: Enhanced connections and wayfinding to community destinations helps people navigate the streets while walking, biking, rolling, and accessing transit.
  • Sustainability: Creating safer streets makes it more comfortable to walk, bike, roll, and take transit and provides more alternatives to driving. Less driving decreases pollution from emissions and improves air quality for residents.

Outreach History

Thousands of community members weighed in on the program and helped shape more than 64 Slow & Safe Street projects, which include multimodal traffic calming measures and improvements to make walking, bicycling, rolling, driving, and accessing transit in our neighborhoods safer. You can expect to see new street changes such as curb extensions to shorten crossings and slow turning vehicles, traffic circles, pedestrian islands and enhanced pedestrian crossings, speed cushions, bicycle lanes, and other treatments that make Denver's streets safer for all! The first phase of construction kicked off in the summer of 2023 and will continue with a second phase in spring through the fall of 2024.

Central Denver

Outreach

Open House #5 - March 22, 2022

At our fifth Central Community Transportation Networks Open House we discussed the second phase of bikeway projects being planned in Central Denver and shared how you can give feedback on the designs. We also highlighted recommendations for multimodal improvements that are based on your input.

  • Meeting Video - English* (YouTube)
  • *Note: Due to a technical issue, the English recording of the live meeting is unavailable. The presentation that was given during the meeting has been rerecorded and is available to view.
  • Meeting Video - Spanish (YouTube)
  • This Q&A Sheet(PDF, 89KB) summarizes the questions we received during the meeting and provides answers to those questions.

Open House #4 – May 4, 2021

At our fourth virtual open house, we presented 60% designs on bikeway projects and shared how to provide input on bikeway improvements in Central Denver.


Bruce Randolph St Virtual Corridor Tour – February 25, 2021

At the Bruce Randolph St Corridor Tour, we spoke with business owners along the corridor.  


Globeville Bike Mobility Projects (E 51st, E 45th, and N Lincoln St) – February 25, 2021 

At this open house we shared how you can provide input on three new opportunities to make it easier to travel by bicycle in the Globeville neighborhood.

Take the survey to provide input to help shape the design of future bikeway and mobility improvements on E 51st Street, E 45th Street and N. Lincoln Street.


Open House #3 – September 30, 2020

At our third virtual open house, we shared how community input has shaped bikeway designs in Central Denver.  


Open House #2 – June 25, 2020 

At our second virtual open house, the community was invited to provide input on the concept designs for the proposed bikeways in the Central Denver neighborhoods. 


Open House #1 – March 10, 2020 

At our first open house at Manual High School, we introduced the Central Community Transportation Network and collected input on multimodal concerns in the central area. See below for materials from this meeting: 

Introduction and Project Background 

Community Vision For Transit, Walking, Biking and Safety 

Community Input Exercise 

Other Projects In The Study Area 


See how your feedback has helped us develop recommendations for multimodal improvements! 

In 2020, you gave us input on how we can make improvements in Central Denver for people walking and rolling, biking, taking transit, or driving. 
 
You can see how that input has helped us to develop recommendations for improvements here.

Northwest Denver

Outreach

OPEN HOUSES

Open House #5 - May 18, 2022

A Virtual Public Meeting for the Northwest Community Transportation Network was held on May 18, 2022 where we discussed bikeway installations planned for later this year, the N Lowell Blvd/Meade St proposed bikeway design, and provided an update on the N Tejon St corridor bikeway.


Open House #4 – April 7, 2021 

At our fourth open house, we presented 60% designs and provided information on how to provide input on bikeway improvements in Northwest Denver. 


Open House #3 – September 23, 2020 

At our third open house, we heard more about how community input has shaped bikeway designs in the Northwest.  


Open House #2 - June 24, 2020 

At our second open house, we discussed opportunities to provide input on proposed bikeway concept designs. 


Open House #1 - April 22, 2020 

At our first open house, we gave an overview of the project, demonstrated how to use our interactive mapping survey tool (now closed to responses), and answered resident questions.  


STAKEHOLDER MEETINGS 

Tejon St Virtual Corridor Tour – October 15, 2020 

At the Tejon St Virtual Corridor Tour, we spoke with business owners along the Tejon St corridor.  


Online Map Survey Tool

Thank you to those of you who provided feedback on how you travel by bike, by bus, by car, and on foot in and around Denver via our online map survey tool. Go to the survey, click on a network area, and select “Show Comments” in the upper right to view the feedback your community has shared.

North Central Denver

More info coming soon!

South Central Denver

Newsletters

You can stay connected on what’s happening in SC CTN by reading our newsletter updates. These regular touchpoints have been created to keep you up to date on what we’re working on and how you can stay engaged.


Outreach

Open House #5 and #6 - May 3, 2022 and May 12, 2022

At the most recent virtual open houses we provided the community with an overview of the complete Community Transportation Network, reviewed project details for 10 projects in the South Central region and answered resident questions. We encouraged community members to continue to provide their feedback utilizing the Konveio survey mapping tool and to sign up for office hours with the project team. Representatives from DOTI’s Neighborhood Transportation Management Program and the Office of Community and Business Engagement discussed how community insights are guiding project decisions.  

Recordings of both meetings are available to view below:  

Note: Spanish-language interpretation was offered at both virtual open houses

The following phase two SC CTN projects were discussed at the meeting:  

  • E 3rd Ave (N Clarkson St to N Gilpin St)
  • E 2nd Ave/N Clarkson (N Galapago St to N Washington St)
  • E Virginia/E Dakota (S Broadway to S Marion Pkwy)
  • E Florida (S Sherman to Buchtel Blvd)
  • S Sherman (E Mississippi Ave to E Yale Ave)
  • S Franklin (Buchtel Blvd to N Dartmouth St)
  • S Birch St (Colorado Center Blvd to E Iliff Ave)
  • N Sherman/E 20th Ave (E Colfax Ave to N 19th St)
  • N Delaware/5th (N Bannock St to W 9th Ave)
  • N Emerson/Pearl (E 3rd Ave to E 20th Ave)

Open House #4 – April 27, 2021

At the fourth open house, the project team unveiled a new community input tool called Konveio and encouraged community members to give feedback on designs for Phase 1 projects that are anticipated to be installed in 2021. The meeting also included a review of Phase 2 project concept surveys and dedicated 1/3 of the meeting time to answering questions from the community. The meeting recording can be viewed by clicking the link below:

Thank you to those that attended the meeting and provided their feedback on Konveio.  The survey is now closed.


Open House #3 – September 24, 2020 

At our third open house we heard more about how community input has shaped bikeway designs in South Central Denver. More than 200 community members attended via live web stream or telephone, with live Spanish-language interpretation offered. A link to the meeting recording and results of the Project Concept Surveys are provided below: 

Thank you to those of you who provided feedback on how you travel by bike, by bus, by car, and on foot in and around Denver.


Open House #2 - June 24, 2020 

At our second open house we discussed opportunities to provide input on proposed bikeway concept designs. 


Open House #1 - April 21, 2020 

At our first open house we gave an overview of the project, demonstrated how to use our interactive mapping survey tool, and answered resident questions. More than 400 community members attended via live web stream or telephone, with live Spanish-language interpretation offered. We also advertised network verification surveys, to make sure we were making investments in the right corridors. A recording of the meeting and results of the network verification surveys are below: 


Corridor Feedback Summary

Review community feedback on bikeway corridors here.

West Denver Safer Streets

The West Denver Safer Streets Projects, funded through the Elevate Denver Bond Program, conducted a robust outreach process between February 2021 and early 2022. Due to the large geographic area that these projects covered, separate open houses and project meetings were held for smaller clusters of projects, as outlined below.

S Irving St and W Bates Ave Projects

Open House #3 - December 2, 2021

A virtual open house for the Irving St and Bates Ave Bikeways was held December 2, 2021 and the meeting videos have been posted below.

Open House #2 - March 16, 2021

A virtual open house meeting for S Irving Street and W Bates Avenue Bikeways was held March 16, 2021 and a meeting video can be viewed below: 

Open House #1 - February 11, 2021


S Tejon St, W Tennessee Ave, S Jason St, and W Virginia Ave Projects

Jason St Virtual Engagement - June 2023

60% designs for the Jason St corridor were posted to an interactive web platform (Konveio) for comment in June 2023, where the project team solidified feedback on the design.

Jason St Virtual Engagement - June/July 2022

Concept designs for the Jason St corridor were posted to an interactive web platform (Konveio) for comment in June and July 2022, where the project team solidified feedback on the design.


Open House #3 - November 17, 2021

A virtual open house for S Tejon St, W Tennessee Ave, and West Virginia Ave Bikeways was held November 17, 2021 and the meeting videos have been posted below.

Open House #2 - March 24, 2021

A virtual open house for S Tejon Street, W Tennessee Avenue, W Virginia Avenue and S Lipan Street Bikeways was held March 24, 2021 and meeting videos have been posted below.

Open House #1 - February 11, 2021


N Tennyson St, W 7th Ave, and N Perry St Projects

Open House #3 - November 16, 2021

A virtual open house for N Tennyson St, W 7th Avenue, and N Perry Street Bikeways was held November 16, 2021 and the meeting videos have been posted below.

Open House #2 - March 25, 2021

A virtual open house for N Tennyson Street, W 7th Avenue and N Perry Street Bikeways was held March 25, 2021 and meeting videos have been posted below.

Open House #1 - February 11, 2021

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