Community Transportation Networks

Overview

Overview

DOTI is starting construction on the Community Transportation Networks – a bold program aimed at rapidly expanding safe and comfortable transportation options within three areas of Denver, with the goal to expand this program citywide in the future.

With the community's help, we are building complete transportation networks that are more connected, safe, and accessible for Denver residents to walk, bike, roll, take public transit, or drive. 

DOTI kicked-off community outreach for the three Community Transportation Networks in 2020, and since, thousands of community members weighed in on the program, and helped shape more than 64 bikeway projects and dozens of other transportation improvements.


Construction Is Starting

In the Fall of 2022, Phase 1 Community Transportation Network projects are starting construction, which will result in 27 new bikeway corridors across the three neighborhoods. Each corridor includes numerous improvements that enhance pedestrian access, make access to transit easier, and minimize vehicle speeding, resulting in more comfortable streets for everyone.  

Zoom into the map to find the network closest to where you live, work, or spend time. To learn about the projects in each area, click the links above.  


The Community Transportation Networks deliver the public’s vision for a better transportation system that provides equity, mobility, safety, community, sustainability, and quality – as described in the City’s visionary transportation plan – Denver Moves Everyone.


Frequently Asked Questions

Community Transportation Networks: Construction FAQ including sections on Process, Painted Bike Lanes, Neighborhood Bikeways, and General.

Process

Who is DOTI and what is DOTI’s role in Denver?

The Denver Department of Transportation and Infrastructure (DOTI) plans, designs, and builds the City’s infrastructure. DOTI also operates, maintains, and regulates infrastructure elements within the public right of way. Infrastructure is grouped into two core functions — utilities and mobility. Utilities deliver our City’s water and waste, as well as Denver’s green infrastructure and services. Mobility delivers transportation infrastructure, services, and initiatives for all travelers, which includes pedestrians, bicyclists, transit riders, commercial vehicles, and drivers. Together, DOTI is responsible for most things transportation related within the public right of way — or all the public space between private property lines.

DOTI is not responsible for Denver’s interstate highways (such as I-25 or I-70) or state roadways; the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) is responsible for those roadways. In addition, DOTI does not operate regional transit in Denver, such as bus or rail service; those transit services are operated by the Regional Transportation District (RTD).

What is the Community Transportation Network process?

The Community Transportation Network (CTN) process is a strategy to provide more transportation options for all Denverites, and safer, more efficient ways to move around town.  The CTN process first completed design concepts for priority corridors and conducted community outreach to verify the ideas aligned with community values.  Designs were then advanced and finalized after additional community input. 

Construction for the first wave of corridors is starting in Fall 2022, and this first package of projects will be completed by Winter 2023.  DOTI will then start construction of the second package of projects after the first set is complete.

More information on the CTN process and construction can be found on DOTI’s CTN website

To review the first package of CTN construction projects, view this map.

Where can I find the construction schedule for CTN projects?

Construction schedules are available on DOTI’s Community Transportation Network webpage.  To find the construction schedule for a specific corridor, click the link for the corridor’s Community Transportation Network (Northwest, Central or South Central) at the top of the webpage, and then scroll down to the Construction Projects tab to see the Project Status. The Project Status column will be updated as construction begins and then again once construction is completed.

How does the Community Transportation Network process relate to the city’s bike lane implementation plans?

The Community Transportation Network process supports implementation of the city’s bike plan, Denver Moves: Bikes, and the city’s commitment to building 125 miles of bikeways by the end of 2023.  The city has prioritized the Northwest, Central, and South Central areas of the city for a significant buildout of Denver’s bike network.  By focusing on the city’s core where population densities are higher, our city will significantly increase the number of households within ¼ mile of a high comfort bikeway, which is a primary goal of the Denver Moves: Bikes Plan.

How were these projects funded/selected?

Denver residents decided on a vision for the city’s complete bikeway network in 2011 (Denver Moves: Bikes). In 2019, the citywide outreach process for the City’s land use and transportation plan, Blueprint Denver, confirmed this bicycle network.  These plans outline where and what types of bikeways Denver should install to create a complete, connected, safe, and comfortable bikeway system in Denver, providing a low-cost, healthy, and environmentally friendly transportation option for all residents, including those who don’t own a car.

How is the type of bikeway selected for each corridor?

DOTI uses its Bikeway Design Manual to identify the appropriate bikeway type for any given street in Denver.  The Manual provides engineering criteria for facility (bikeway type) selection based on variables like amount of vehicle traffic, number of traffic lanes, and vehicle speeds. These criteria represent a data-driven approach to bikeway facility selection that prioritizes the safety of bicyclists.  Through the planning and design process, DOTI determines whether the bikeway facility proposed in Denver Moves Bikes (2011, with subsequent plan updates) aligns with the facility type criteria outlined in the design manual.

What was the community engagement process for selecting this bikeway?

Building Denver’s complete bikeway network reflects more than a decade of work, involving thousands of community members that have helped to shape the vision for a better bicycling experience in Denver.  Through Denver Moves Bikes, which DOTI completed in 2011, community feedback helped to shape where and what type of bikeways were needed to create a complete bicycling network, with the goal to make bicycling a safe, comfortable, and convenient option for all types of trips in Denver.  Then in 2015, DOTI updated Denver Moves Bikes to reflect enhancements to the state of the practice of urban bikeway design.  

Starting in 2020, each Community Transportation Network (Northwest, Central, and South Central), led focused virtual community meetings, distributed public surveys, met with community leaders, presented to Registered Neighborhood Organizations, held virtual office hours, and more to identify community priorities along the identified bikeway corridors and gather community feedback on concept and more advanced corridor designs. During each stage of outreach, DOTI collected feedback and updated the bikeway designs to best reflect community values and design standards.

In addition to community engagement, how did the City use feedback from other planning efforts to inform this one?

Community Transportation Networks align with the community’s twenty-year vision to create a better bicycling experience in Denver, building on the work of Denveright, Blueprint Denver, Neighborhood Area PlansNeighborhood Transportation Management Plans, Comprehensive Plan 2040, and other projects that value safety, connectivity and transportation choice.  DOTI continues to work closely Denverites to refine priorities and projects.

Has DOTI counted amount of bicyclists that ride along the corridor and is there enough demand to justify bike lanes?

Yes, bicycle counts have been conducted. However, bicycle counts are not prerequisite for the installation of a bikeway.  National and local studies (summarized here) consistently show that when space on the roadway is designated for people on bikes, it is used. Additionally, cities with the most miles of bikeways, all things equal, exhibit the lowest rates of all crashes. 

Furthermore, research indicates that drivers too prefer streets that are designed with space for bicyclists, as it creates more predictability for everyone, helping to reduce stress while travelling for all (Transportation Research, 2016).  Building out a network of bikeways therefore benefits all roadway users, even those who choose not to bicycle.

Who can travel in a bike lane?

Anyone on a bicycle, electric bicycle, or electric scooter (including those riding a Lyft or Lime scooter) are able ride in a bike lane.

I'm a bicyclist, and I feel safe riding on this street. Can you explain to me, if I feel safe, why these changes are needed?

Denver has a citywide goal is to increase the number of people bicycling, especially those who do not bicycle today because they don’t feel comfortable doing so.  These “interested but concerned” riders, are the target audience for the expansion of Denver’s bikeway network by 125 miles in 5-years.

Research of metro-Denverites indicated that only about 16% of people feel comfortable riding on Denver’s streets today; the majority of people (59%) would bicycle, but only if safe, convenient bikeways are provided.  Expanding bicycle infrastructure is intended to serve the 59% of bicyclists.

A graph showing the four types of bicyclists in Denver: Highly Confident Bicyclists (4% of all bicyclists); Somewhat Confident Bicyclists (12%); Interested but Concerned Bicyclists (59%); No Way, No How (25%)

I'm never going to bicycle, and I don’t want these improvements on my street. Can’t you implement this project somewhere else?

Denver’s streets, which are owned and operated by the Denver Department of Transportation and Infrastructure (DOTI), are the travel ways that connect our community, and are not intended to benefit one neighborhood or group of people.  We frequently call streets “our streets,” or ”our parking,” but these titles overlook how streets are Denver’s largest public space, and are not owned by individuals.  

Streets are a public good, which provide benefits to people beyond those who live on a particular street.  It is DOTI’s responsibility to asses the use of this public good, and ensure that the highest -and-best use is maintained.  Blueprint Denver and the Denver’s Mobility Plans, including Denver Moves: Bicycles, represent the vision thousands of people have provided for how places and streets should be planned and designed to operate for all Denverites.

What types of bikeways will DOTI build through the Community Transportation Networks?

The four types of bikeways that DOTI will build through CTN are: protected bike lanes, buffered bike lanes, neighborhood bikeways, and bike lanes.  Both protected bike lanes and neighborhood bikeways are considered high-comfort bikeways, with protected bike lanes including physical separation from vehicle traffic and neighborhood bikeways including design elements that slow traffic and prioritize bicycle and pedestrian travel.  Moderate comfort bikeways include buffered bike lanes and bike lanes, which are designed in certain situations where higher-comfort bikeways are not feasible due to roadway widths or other considerations.  Lastly, DOTI is currently working to upgrade “signed route/shared lanes” that are marked on our bike map to the four other types of bikeways so they are safer and more comfortable for bicyclists.

To attract new riders to Denver’s bikeway network, it is important to build the most comfortable bikeways possible.  Bicyclists are typically grouped into four categories: Highly Confident, Somewhat Confident, Interested but Concerned, and No Way/No How.  Research of metro-Denverites indicated that only about 16% of people fit into the Highly Confident and Somewhat Confident categories today, while the majority of people (59%) would bicycle, but only if safe, convenient bikeways are provided.  Expanding bicycle infrastructure with high-comfort facilities is intended to serve this majority of bicyclists.

A graph showing the four types of bicyclists in Denver: Highly Confident Bicyclists (4% of all bicyclists); Somewhat Confident Bicyclists (12%); Interested but Concerned Bicyclists (59%); No Way, No How (25%)

Painted Bike Lanes (Bike Lanes, Buffered Bike Lanes, Protected Bike Lanes)

What are bike lanes?

Bike lanes are dedicated bikeways on streets that separate a person bicycling from motor vehicles with a striped line.  Bike lanes run next to curbs or vehicle parking. DOTI’s bikeway design also includes improvements at intersections that slow down vehicle traffic, make pedestrian crossings shorter and safer, and make it easier for all street users to see on-coming traffic at intersections, improving street safety for all. 

A bike lane with a white stripe separating the bicyclist from the roadway is seen below:

A bicyclist riding on a bike lane with a white stripe separating the bicyclist from the roadway.

What are buffered bike lanes?

Buffered bike lanes are dedicated bikeways on streets that separate a person bicycling from motor vehicles with a striped line and physical separation between a person bicycling and where vehicles drive.  Buffered bike lanes better organize the roadway so that people who ride bikes have a wider space to travel within, and drivers have more buffer between their cars and bicyclists, which helps to reduce the stress of driving next to bicyclists.  DOTI’s bikeway design also includes improvements at intersections that slow down vehicle traffic, make pedestrian crossings shorter and safer, and make it easier for all street users to see on-coming traffic at intersections, improving street safety for all.

A buffered bike lane, with physical separation between the bikeway and the road is shown below:

Bicyclists riding on a buffered bike lane with physical separation between the bikeway and the roadway.

What are protected bike lanes?

Protected bike lanes are dedicated bikeways on streets that have both a horizontal and vertical buffer between a person bicycling and motor vehicles and are typically built on busier streets with higher speed limits.  A horizontal buffer is separated space between the bikeway and the roadway (typically at least three feet of space), and a vertical buffer includes either plastic bollards and rubber curbs or concrete barriers that provide a physical barrier between bicyclists and vehicles.

The image below shows a protected bike lane with plastic bollards and rubber curbs.

A protected bike lane with plastic bollards and rubber curbs providing physical separation between the bikeway and the roadway.

These facilities better organize the roadway so that people who ride bikes or scooters have dedicated space to travel safely.  DOTI’s bikeway design also includes improvements at intersections that slow down vehicle traffic, make pedestrian crossings shorter and safer, and make it easier for all street users to see on-coming traffic at intersections, improving street safety for all.

Why is a protected bike lane considered high comfort?

A high comfort bikeway provides a more comfortable ride for people of all skill levels on a bicycle through a variety of potential safety measures, including space to design safer intersections, crossing prioritization for bicyclists at intersections with stoplights, and vertical barriers between bikes and cars that reduce stress for bicyclists.

A high comfort bikeway is where you and your family would feel comfortable riding your bike, which means that you have space and freedom to get where you need to go.  There are criteria for maximum speed and traffic volumes which dictate where high comfort bikeways are installed.

Will this project make traffic worse?

DOTI studies each roadway carefully, and the improvements are designed to maximize safety and meet DOTI’s engineering standards. For example, DOTI has criteria that dictates how many lanes are required for a particular volume of vehicular traffic to ensure that changes do not cause large travel delays.  Overall, there is not always enough street space to accommodate all street uses , which requires tradeoffs. 

People walking and bicycling in Denver are heavily over-represented in serious injuries and fatalities occurring on our streets – making these street users more vulnerable and at greater potential risk when travelling.  With safety as DOTI’s top priority, street features such as parking, curbside use, turn lanes, or travel lanes may need to be repurposed to improve safety for the most vulnerable road users. 

Read more about the City’s Vision Zero program here.

Why did you remove on-street parking in front of my house/on my block?

DOTI collects street parking data when considering whether to change where and when on-street parking is allowed.  DOTI does this by counting the number of vehicles parked on each block, when anticipated use is the highest.  For example, for residential areas this means counting at 5am when most vehicles are parked overnight.  For commercial areas with an active night life, a Friday evening count captures the highest use.  If a street has a combination of uses, DOTI collects parking data during multiple periods.  For each corridor, DOTI develops a tailored approach to parking data collection to provide a broad understanding of parking use.  Once the count is complete, DOTI calculates the available parking supply and occupancy rate, and uses the results of this data collection to inform the street design.

Once parking use data is collected, DOTI also considers the availability of driveways/garages and side street parking, the needs of all road users, land use context, and the presence of businesses or institutional uses (like schools or parks).  Overall – it is DOTI’s responsibility to program the highest and best use of the public-right-of-way in order to create the safest street for all who use it.  In some instances, removing or reducing parking is necessary to create a safer street for all.

What if I or someone who lives in my house has a disability and has no choice but to park on the street?

If a resident needs accessible parking on the street, please read more about the Program (link here). If you believe you meet the Program criteria, you can apply for an ADA parking space (accessibleparking@denvergov.org) so that DOTI engineers can plan for and accommodate the ADA space curbside need in the project design.  DOTI also incorporates any existing ADA parking spaces into bikeway designs, so residents can maintain access to these spaces.

What if I will need on-street parking space for future regular (e.g., landscaping) or one-time (home renovation) use?

If you or your business has regular (landscapers, for example) or one-time (home renovation, for example) additional parking needs, those needs should be met using driveway parking, side street parking, or as a last resort, by applying for a permit to close the bike lane (see DOTI’s Right of Way Permit website for more information).  It is not legal to park or load a vehicle in any designated bikeway.  Vehicles parked or loading are liable for tickets and towing.  Once the bikeway is installed, street users are to obey all existing and new parking signs.

I place my trash in the parking lane in front of my house. Once parking is removed, where should I place my trash?

Property owners should place their trash and waste bins in the buffer space (diagonally striped space between the bike lane and the vehicle lane/parking lane), or in the parking lane.  Please do not block the bike lane with your trash.

For corridors with parking removal, where will my visitors park?

Your visitors can park on any adjacent side street where parking is permitted.

Will commercial traffic get ticketed for parking in a bike lane?

The enforcement of parking restrictions and rules is performed by the City’s Right of Way Enforcement team.  Owners of parked vehicles are responsible for following posted on-street parking allowances.  Elements are being included in the corridor concept designs to discourage illegal parking.


Neighborhood Bikeways

What is a Neighborhood Bikeway?

Neighborhood Bikeways are low-volume, low-speed streets designed to prioritize people who are biking, walking, and rolling using design elements such as signage, pavement markings, speed and/or volume reduction features, and crossing improvements.  DOTI’s bikeway design also includes improvements at intersections that slow down vehicle traffic, make pedestrian crossings shorter and safer, and make it easier for all street users to see on-coming traffic at intersections, improving street safety for all.

Neighborhood bikeways are also sometimes called bicycle boulevards or neighborhood greenways.  Neighborhood bikeways are most commonly installed along local streets, since these streets typically have less, slower moving traffic.  The design elements of neighborhood bikeways are intended to make the street into a safer place for people to walk and bike, while still allowing local vehicle traffic to access homes and businesses.

Neighborhood bikeways include two primary design elements intended to make streets safer for people – these include:

  • Slowing Vehicles Down: On streets where vehicle traffic speeds are already slow, DOTI does not need to implement streets designs to further slow speeds.  However, on streets where travel speeds are higher than is deemed safe for a neighborhood bikeway, DOTI will implement street designs that are effective at slowing vehicle traffic down to the target speeds.
  • Reducing Cut-Through Traffic: On streets where traffic levels are low, DOTI does not need to implement street designs that reduce the amount of cut-through traffic.  However, on streets where traffic levels are higher than is deemed safe for a neighborhood bikeway, DOTI will implement street designs that are effective at reducing the amount of cut-through traffic.  These changes to the street still enable people who live and work on the street to access their homes and businesses, and deliveries can still be made.  The changes are primarily made to make cut through trips inconvenient, motivating these people to find an alternative route.

Watch this video and see our Neighborhood Bikeway website for more information about neighborhood bikeways in Denver.

Why are you installing traffic circles at some intersections along neighborhood bikeways?

Traffic circles at intersections are intended to slow down traffic and make the street feel safer for everyone, including those who are bicycling or walking with children or those who are less comfortable bicycling in mixed traffic.  We are installing intersection treatments at many intersections along neighborhood bikeways, but they are not all traffic circles.  The type of treatment we are installing depends on whether there are existing stop signs, if it's a crossing with a bigger street or smaller street, and the distance between that intersection and other treatments designed to slow down vehicles.

Do traffic circles and bumpouts along neighborhood bikeways remove parking near intersections?

DOTI’s intersection improvements, such as traffic circles and bumpouts, are designed to both reinforce an existing parking ordinance (No. 54-458) regarding how close you allowed to park to any Denver intersection (20' from a stop sign or crosswalk) and provides additional distance for people driving, bicycling, and walking to see each other and navigate the traffic circle.  This ensures people walking, bicycling, or driving have more time to react to each other.

Why is a neighborhood bikeway considered high comfort?

A high comfort bikeway provides a more comfortable ride for people of all skill levels on a bicycle, and greater predictability for all roadway users, compared to traditional bike lanes or “sharrow” streets.  

A high comfort bikeway is where you and your family would feel comfortable riding your bike, which means that you have space and freedom to get where you need to go.  There are criteria for maximum speed and traffic volumes which dictate where high comfort bikeways are installed.  Traffic calming and speed reduction measures are taken to make the high comfort bikeway safer and more comfortable.


General

How are bikeway projects funded?

In Denver, transportation is primarily funded by property taxes, general fund transfers, grants from state and regional agencies, and bond programs approved by voters.  Fuel taxes and vehicle registration fees primarily fund statewide improvements.  The share of these revenues distributed to the city account for just 7% of the citywide Capital Improvement Fund, and only a portion of those dollars are used to fund transportation improvements in Denver.  The average residential property owner in Denver contributes $50 a year in property taxes that directly support DOTI’s transportation projects (CCD, 2021).  See the figure below for more information on annual funding sources for Denver’s transportation projects.

A pie chart showing Denver’s transportation funding sources between 2017 and 2022: 40% from Capital Improvement Funds, 22% from General Funds, 19% from State and Federal Grants, and 19% Bond Funds

How will this project improve safety?

Safety is our number one priority! Research from cities across the U.S. (including Denver) demonstrates that cities with more high-quality bike infrastructure have 44% fewer traffic deaths and injuries overall (Streetsblog.org).  In addition to enhanced bikeways, these improvements will include other types of transportation safety features where possible: intersection improvements, safer pedestrian crossings and other ways to get us closer to zero traffic related fatalities and serious injuries.

When bike lanes are installed, the vehicular travel lanes are visually narrowed (i.e. , feel narrower to a person driving). This helps slow drivers down and contributes to safety.  Other design elements (including improved pedestrian crossings and “daylighting” – increasing visibility turning to and from side streets by pulling parking back from intersections) also slow vehicle traffic, improve visibility, or both.  Additionally, Denver has a Vision Zero Action Plan with a goal of eliminating all traffic-related deaths and serious injuries on Denver’s roadways by 2030.  As part of Denver’s Vision Zero efforts, DOTI is conducting a city-wide speed mitigation study to identify streets where the posted speed limit can be lowered.  These bike paving corridors may be evaluated and selected for speed reduction during this process.

How will this project improve safety at intersections?

DOTI studies each intersection carefully, and the improvements are designed to maximize safety and satisfy specific design guidelines.  For example, the DOTI has criteria that dictates when turn lanes can be repurposed based on vehicle traffic volume to ensure removal does not cause large travel delays.  Overall, there is not always enough right-of-way to accommodate all street uses safely, which leads to tradeoffs.  With safety as a design priority, it may mean that street features such as parking, curbside use, or turn lanes may need to be repurposed to improve safety for the most vulnerable road users.

Who will maintain these bikeways?

The Department of Transportation and Infrastructure will maintain the bikeways, including snow removal for protected bike lanes and debris removal.

How will the city enforce bicycle traffic laws, such as speeding e-bikes and failing to obey stop signs?

The enforcement of traffic laws is handled by the Denver Police Department. People on bikes are responsible for following posted speed limits and traffic laws.  Colorado also recently passed the Colorado Safety Stop, which gives people on bikes and other “low speed conveyances” the legal option to ride slowly through stop signs without stopping first, as long as they are yielding right of way to pedestrians and other road users who have the right-of-way.  You can read more about this new traffic law here.

Have the impacts to school drop-off zones along the corridor been considered?

Yes, where school drop-off zones are present along the study corridors, DOTI planners and designers are working with school facilities and administration staff to design a roadway that accommodates school needs and is safe for all roadway users.

 

Central Denver

Thanks to everyone who has provided input to shape the Central Community Transportation Network (Central CTN)! Construction is Central CTN bikeway corridors has begun. Thanks to the thousands of people who have provided input to shape the Central CTN. With your help, we will continue to build a complete transportation network that is more connected, safe, and accessible for Denver residents who walk, bike, roll, take public transit or drive.

Central CTN includes projects in the following neighborhoods: Downtown, City Park, City Park West, Clayton, Cole, Five Points, and Whittier.


Project Status: Phase 1 corridors are going to construction!  

Since 2020, the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure (DOTI) collected public feedback on proposed Central CTN bikeway corridors through community open houses, numerous online surveys, and office hours discussions with residents. The first phase of bikeway installations has begun. 

Projects in Construction: See the Construction Projects tab below for more information related to construction status of Phase 1 Projects. For upcoming installation, the public will be notified in advance of the construction date.  

Projects in Design: See the Design Projects tab below for Phase 2 Projects. DOTI shared multiple initial designs for these projects with the community for feedback, and the DOTI project team is now finalizing these designs to prep them for construction. Phase 2 Projects do not yet have a set construction date.


Project Background Information: Miss a meeting or want to learn more about the history of these projects? We have you covered! View information from past outreach events on the Outreach tab below. Want to make sure you get notifications for future events? Sign up for notifications using the form on this page!


Construction Projects

Construction on Central CTN Phase 1 Projects has begun.  Review the table below to see construction status information for projects in your neighborhood.

Project Neighborhood Project Status  Project Documents 
16th St: Chestnut Pl to Wynkoop St Central Business District Starting 2022/2023 Corridor Info and Proposed Design
17th St: Wynkoop St to Tremont Pl Central Business District Starting 2022/2023 Corridor Info and Proposed Design
25th Ave: Lafayette St to Vine St Whittier Starting 2022/2023 Corridor Info and Proposed Design
26th Ave: Blake St to Glenarm Pl Five Points Starting 2022/2023 Corridor Info and Proposed Design
Larimer St: 25th St to 17th St Central Business District Starting 2022/2023 Corridor Info and Proposed Design
Lawrence St: 22nd St to 35th St Five Points Starting 2022/2023 Corridor Info and Proposed Design
Tremont Pl: 15th St to 16th St Central Business District Starting 2022/2023 Corridor Info and Proposed Design
16th Ave: Broadway St to Esplanade North Capitol Hill/City Park West Starting 2022/2023 Corridor Info and Proposed Design
30th St: Blake St to Downing St Five Points Starting 2022/2023 Corridor Info and Proposed Design
City Park Esplanade: 16th Ave to Colfax Ave City Park Ready For Construction Corridor Info and Proposed Design

Design Projects

Project Neighborhood Project Status  Project Documents 
Bruce Randolph Ave: Downing St to Colorado Blvd Cole/Clayton Planning Corridor Info and Proposed Design
15th St: Larimer St to Central Central Business District Design Corridor Info and Proposed Design
Delgany St: Wewatta Way to 29th St Five Points Design Corridor Info and Proposed Design
15th St: Colfax Ave to Cleveland Pl Central Business District Design Corridor Info and Proposed Design
21st Ave: Downing St to Colorado Blvd City Park West/City Park Design Corridor Info and Proposed Design
26th Ave: Vine St to York St (just east of York) Whittier Design Corridor Info and Proposed Design
Marion St: Bruce Randolph to 21st Ave Whittier/Cole Design Corridor Info and Proposed Design
Tremont/Glenarm Pl: 20th Ave to 26th St Five Points Design Corridor Info and Proposed Design
Vine St (formerly Gaylord): Bruce Randolph to 21st Ave Whittier/Cole Design Corridor Info and Proposed Design
Williams St (formerly High St): 31st to 21st Ave Cole/City Park West Design Corridor Info and Proposed Design
7th St: Auraria Pkwy to Colfax Ave Auraria Design Corridor Info and Proposed Design
28th Ave: Washington to Vine Whittier Design Corridor Info and Proposed Design

*What does Project Status mean?

  • Planning – Team is leading analysis of existing conditions and alternatives, and generating conceptual ideas for changes to the corridor, and sharing ideas with the community to gain feedback about pros and cons of different solutions. Designs being revised to reflect feedback.  
  • Design – The conceptual design has been shared with the community and confirmed. Team is advancing ideas and concepts into detailed engineering. More advanced designs are shared with the community to clearly communicate specific changes and assess modifications.  
  • Construction – The project design is complete. Project is being programmed for construction, and public will be notified in advance of construction date.

Outreach

Outreach

Open House #5 - March 22, 2022

At our fifth Central Community Transportation Networks Open House we discussed the second phase of bikeway projects being planned in Central Denver and shared how you can give feedback on the designs. We also highlighted recommendations for multimodal improvements that are based on your input.

  • Meeting Video - English* (YouTube)
  • *Note: Due to a technical issue, the English recording of the live meeting is unavailable. The presentation that was given during the meeting has been rerecorded and is available to view.
  • Meeting Video - Spanish (YouTube)
  • This Q&A Sheet(PDF, 89KB) summarizes the questions we received during the meeting and provides answers to those questions.

Open House #4 – May 4, 2021

At our fourth virtual open house, we presented 60% designs on bikeway projects and shared how to provide input on bikeway improvements in Central Denver.


Bruce Randolph St Virtual Corridor Tour – February 25, 2021

At the Bruce Randolph St Corridor Tour, we spoke with business owners along the corridor.  


Globeville Bike Mobility Projects (E 51st, E 45th, and N Lincoln St) – February 25, 2021 

At this open house we shared how you can provide input on three new opportunities to make it easier to travel by bicycle in the Globeville neighborhood.

Take the survey to provide input to help shape the design of future bikeway and mobility improvements on E 51st Street, E 45th Street and N. Lincoln Street.


Open House #3 – September 30, 2020

At our third virtual open house, we shared how community input has shaped bikeway designs in Central Denver.  

Thank you to those of you who provided feedback on how you travel by bike, by bus, by car, and on foot in and around Denver via our online map survey tool. Go to the survey, click on a network area, and select “Show Comments” in the upper right to view the feedback your community has shared.

Open House #2 – June 25, 2020 

At our second virtual open house, the community was invited to provide input on the concept designs for the proposed bikeways in the Central Denver neighborhoods. 

Open House #1 – March 10, 2020 

At our first open house at Manual High School, we introduced the Central Community Transportation Network and collected input on multimodal concerns in the central area. See below for materials from this meeting: 

Introduction and Project Background 

Community Vision For Transit, Walking, Biking and Safety 

Community Input Exercise 

Other Projects In The Study Area 


See how your feedback has helped us develop recommendations for multimodal improvements! 

In 2020, you gave us input on how we can make improvements in Central Denver for people walking and rolling, biking, taking transit, or driving. 
 
You can see how that input has helped us to develop recommendations for improvements here.

 

Northwest Denver

Thanks to everyone who has provided input to shape the Northwest Denver Community Transportation Network (NW CTN)! Construction on the NW CTN bikeway corridors has begun. Thanks to the thousands of people who have provided input to shape the Northwest Community Transportation Network. With your help, we will continue to build a complete transportation network that is more connected, safe, and accessible for Denver residents who walk, bike, roll, take public transit or drive. 

NW CTN includes the following neighborhoods: Berkeley, Chaffee Park, Jefferson Park, Regis, Sloan Lake, Sunnyside, and West Highland.


Project Status: Phase 1 corridors are going to construction!

Completed speed cushion along the Perry Street corridor.


Completed speed cushion along the Perry St corridor


Since 2020, the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure (DOTI) project team collected public feedback on proposed NW CTN bikeway corridors through community open houses, numerous online surveys, and office hours discussions with residents. The first phase of bikeway installations has begun.

Projects in Construction: See the Construction Projects tab below for more information related to construction status of Phase 1 Projects. For upcoming installation, the public will be notified in advance of the construction date.  

Projects in Design: See the Design Projects tab below for Phase 2 Projects. DOTI shared multiple initial designs for these projects with the community for feedback, and the DOTI project team is now finalizing these designs to prep them for construction. Phase 2 Projects do not yet have a set construction date.


Project Background Information: Miss a meeting or want to learn more about the history of these projects? We have you covered! View information from past outreach events on the Outreach tab below. Want to make sure you get notifications for future events? Sign up for notifications using the form on this page!


Please see each corridor’s pulldown information for upcoming public meeting information.

Construction Projects

Construction on NW CTN Phase 1 Projects is starting Fall 2022.  Review the table below to see construction status information for projects in your neighborhood.

Project Neighborhood Project Status  Project Documents 
N Clay St: W 32nd Ave to W 46th Ave Sunnyside/West Highland Starting 2022/2023 60% Design
N Eliot St: W 23rd Ave to W 29th Ave Jefferson Park Starting 2022/2023 60% Design
N Julian St: W 19th Ave to W 35th Ave Sloan's Lake Starting 2022/2023 60% Design
N Perry St: W Lakeshore Dr to W 46th Ave Sloan's Lake/Berkeley Construction ongoing, including speed cushion and traffic circle installation, adding pavement markings, and erecting signage 60% Design
W 23rd Ave: N Stuart St to N Lowell Blvd Sloan's Lake Construction ongoing, including adding pavement markings and erecting signage 60% Design
W 41st/40th Ave: N Perry St to N Inca St Sunnyside/Berkeley Construction ongoing, including adding pavement markings and erecting signage 60% Design
W 46th Ave: N Tennyson St to Federal Blvd Berkeley Starting 2022/2023 60% Design
N Zuni St: W 46th Ave to W 52nd Ave Sunnyside/Chaffee Park Complete No link
W 46th Ave: N Federal Blvd to N Inca St Sunnyside Complete Corridor Info
W 50th Ave: N Tennyson St to N Lowell Blvd Regis/Berkeley Complete Corridor Info
W Bryon Pl: N Sheridan Blvd to N Vrain St Sloan's Lake Complete Corridor Info

Traffic Impacts:

  • Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
  • No night time work is currently anticipated.
  • Construction schedules are weather-dependent and subject to change.
  • Expect travel delays of up to 15 minutes. Motorists will encounter brief closures with single-lane alternating traffic to allow trucks and equipment to enter and exit the work zone. In areas where work will soon commence, “no parking” cones will be placed a minimum of 24 hours in advance.

Helpful Information During Construction:

  • There may be lane closures during construction, so your access could be temporarily restricted.
  • Please follow all the permanent and temporary parking signs for on street parking.
  • Consider other places for you and/or your customers to park while the construction is being completed.
  • For your safety, be aware of heavy equipment in the area and observe all traffic control signs and flaggers.

Design Projects

Project Neighborhood Project Status  Project Documents 
N Lowell Blvd/Meade St: W 46th to W 52nd Ave Regis/Berkeley Planning Proposed Design
N Tejon St (or parallel corridor): W 46th Ave to W 32nd Ave Sunnyside/West Highland Planning Corridor Info and Proposed Design

*What does Project Status mean?

  • Planning – Team is leading analysis of existing conditions and alternatives, and generating conceptual ideas for changes to the corridor, and sharing ideas with the community to gain feedback about pros and cons of different solutions. Designs being revised to reflect feedback.  
  • Design – The conceptual design has been shared with the community and confirmed. Team is advancing ideas and concepts into detailed engineering. More advanced designs are shared with the community to clearly communicate specific changes and assess modifications.  
  • Construction – The project design is complete. Project is being programmed for construction, and public will be notified in advance of construction date.

Outreach

Outreach

OPEN HOUSES

Open House #5 - May 18, 2022

A Virtual Public Meeting for the Northwest Community Transportation Network was held on May 18, 2022 where we discussed bikeway installations planned for later this year, the N Lowell Blvd/Meade St proposed bikeway design, and provided an update on the N Tejon St corridor bikeway.

Please provide your input on the N Lowell Blvd/Meade St proposed bikeway design by Friday, June 17th at bit.ly/NWCTNComment

Open House #4 – April 7, 2021 

At our fourth open house, we presented 60% designs and provided information on how to provide input on bikeway improvements in Northwest Denver. 

Open House #3 – September 23, 2020 

At our third open house, we heard more about how community input has shaped bikeway designs in the Northwest.  

Open House #2 - June 24, 2020 

At our second open house, we discussed opportunities to provide input on proposed bikeway concept designs. 

Open House #1 - April 22, 2020 

At our first open house, we gave an overview of the project, demonstrated how to use our interactive mapping survey tool (now closed to responses), and answered resident questions.  


STAKEHOLDER MEETINGS 

Tejon St Virtual Corridor Tour – October 15, 2020 

At the Tejon St Virtual Corridor Tour, we spoke with business owners along the Tejon St corridor.  


Online Map Survey Tool

Thank you to those of you who provided feedback on how you travel by bike, by bus, by car, and on foot in and around Denver via our online map survey tool. Go to the survey, click on a network area, and select “Show Comments” in the upper right to view the feedback your community has shared.

 

South Central Denver

Thanks to everyone who has provided input to shape the South Central Community Transportation Network (SC CTN)! Construction on SC CTN bikeway corridors has begun. Thanks to the thousands of people who have provided input to shape the SC CTN. With your help, we will continue to build a complete transportation network that is more connected, safe, and accessible for Denver residents who walk, bike, roll, take public transit or drive. 

SC CTN includes the following neighborhoods: Alamo Placita, Baker, Capitol Hill, Cheeseman Park, City Park West, Country Club, Golden Triangle, La Alma, Lincoln Park, Overland, Platt Park, Rosedale, and West Washington Park.


Project Status: Phase 1 corridors are going to construction!

Since 2020, the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure (DOTI) collected public feedback on proposed SC CTN bikeway corridors through community open houses, numerous online surveys, and office hours discussions with residents. The first phase of bikeway installations has begun.

Projects in Construction: See the Construction Projects tab below for more information related to construction status of Phase 1 Projects. For upcoming installation, the public will be notified in advance of the construction date.  

Projects in Design: See the Design Projects tab below for Phase 2 Projects. DOTI shared multiple initial designs for these projects with the community for feedback, and the DOTI project team is now finalizing these designs to prep them for construction. Phase 2 Projects do not yet have a set construction date.


Project Background Information: Miss a meeting or want to learn more about the history of these projects? We have you covered! View information from past outreach events on the Outreach tab below. Want to make sure you get notifications for future events? Sign up for notifications using the form on this page!


Construction Projects

Construction on SC CTN Phase 1 Projects is starting early 2023. Review the table below to see construction status information for projects in your neighborhood.

Project Neighborhood Project Status  Project Documents 
S Cherokee St/1st: N Bannock St to W Alameda Ave Baker/La Alma, Lincoln Park Starting early 2023 Documents
E Bayaud Ave: S Cherokee St to S Downing St Baker/La Alma, Lincoln Park Starting early 2023 Documents
N Galapago St: W 13th Ave to W 3rd Ave Baker/La Alma, Lincoln Park Starting early 2023 Documents
E Exposition Ave: S Lincoln St to S Downing St West Washington Park Construction ongoing Documents
S Pearl St/N Pearl St: Speer Blvd to E Kentucky Ave West Washington Park Starting early 2023 Documents
N Sherman St: E 14th Ave to E 7th Ave Capitol Hill Starting early 2023 Documents
E 14th Ave: N Bannock St to N Grant St Civic Center Starting early 2023 Documents
E 13th Ave: N Grant St to N Lincoln St Civic Center Starting early 2023 Documents
E 7th Ave: N Broadway St to N High St Capitol Hill Construction ongoing, including pouring concrete for sidewalks and curbs Documents
N Franklin St: E 21st Ave to Cheesman Park Capitol Hill Starting early 2023 Documents
E Kentucky Ave: S Pearl St to S Downing St West Washington Park Starting early 2023 Documents

Traffic Impacts:

  • Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
  • No night time work is currently anticipated.
  • Construction schedules are weather-dependent and subject to change.
  • Expect travel delays of up to 15 minutes. Motorists will encounter brief closures with single-lane alternating traffic to allow trucks and equipment to enter and exit the work zone. In areas where work will soon commence, “no parking” cones will be placed a minimum of 24 hours in advance.

Helpful Information During Construction:

  • There may be lane closures during construction, so your access could be temporarily restricted.
  • Please follow all the permanent and temporary parking signs for on street parking.
  • Consider other places for you and/or your customers to park while the construction is being completed.
  • For your safety, be aware of heavy equipment in the area and observe all traffic control signs and flaggers.

Design Projects

Project Neighborhood Project Status  Project Documents 
E Iowa Ave: Acoma St to Sherman St Platt Park Design Documents
E 2nd Ave/N Clarkston St: N Pearl St to E 3rd Ave Alamo Placita Design Documents
E 2nd Ave/W 2nd Ave: N Galapago St to N Pearl St  Baker/La Alma, Lincoln Park Design Documents
N Shoshone St/5th Ave: Curtis St to W 13th Ave Baker/La Alma, Lincoln Park Design Documents
N Emerson St/N Pearl St: E 3rd Ave to E 20th Ave Capitol Hill Design Documents
N Sherman St/E 20th Ave: E Colfax Ave to N 19th St Capitol Hill Design Documents
E 3rd Ave: N Clarkson to N Gilpin St Country Club Design Documents
N Delaware St/W 5th Ave: N Bannock St to W 9th Ave Golden Triangle Design Documents
E Florida Ave: S Sherman St to S Corona St Platt Park Design

Documents

S Sherman St: E Mississippi Ave to E Harvard Ave Platt Park/Rosedale Design Documents
S Franklin St: Buchtel Blvd to E Dartmouth St University/Platt Park/Rosedale Design

Documents

E Virginia Ave/E Dakota Ave: S Sherman St to S Marion St Pkwy West Washington Park Design Documents
W Mississippi Ave/S Logan St: S Sherman St to E Kentucky Ave West Washington Park/Platt Park Design Documents

*What does Project Status mean? 

  • Planning – Team is leading analysis of existing conditions and alternatives, and generating conceptual ideas for changes to the corridor, and sharing ideas with the community to gain feedback about pros and cons of different solutions. Designs being revised to reflect feedback.  
  • Design – The conceptual design has been shared with the community and confirmed. Team is advancing ideas and concepts into detailed engineering. More advanced designs are shared with the community to clearly communicate specific changes and assess modifications.  
  • Construction – The project design is complete. Project is being programmed for construction, and public will be notified in advance of construction date.

Outreach

Newsletters

You can stay connected on what’s happening in SC CTN by reading our newsletter updates. These regular touchpoints have been created to keep you up to date on what we’re working on and how you can stay engaged.


Outreach

Open House #5 and #6 - May 3, 2022 and May 12, 2022

At the most recent virtual open houses we provided the community with an overview of the complete Community Transportation Network, reviewed project details for 10 projects in the South Central region and answered resident questions. We encouraged community members to continue to provide their feedback utilizing the Konveio survey mapping tool (OPEN NOW) and to sign up for office hours with the project team. Representatives from DOTI’s Neighborhood Transportation Management Program and the Office of Community and Business Engagement discussed how community insights are guiding project decisions.  

Recordings of both meetings are available to view below:  

Note: Spanish-language interpretation was offered at both virtual open houses

The following phase two SC CTN projects were discussed at the meeting:  

  • E 3rd Ave (N Clarkson St to N Gilpin St)
  • E 2nd Ave/N Clarkson (N Galapago St to N Washington St)
  • E Virginia/E Dakota (S Broadway to S Marion Pkwy)
  • E Florida (S Sherman to Buchtel Blvd)
  • S Sherman (E Mississippi Ave to E Yale Ave)
  • S Franklin (Buchtel Blvd to N Dartmouth St)
  • S Birch St (Colorado Center Blvd to E Iliff Ave)
  • N Sherman/E 20th Ave (E Colfax Ave to N 19th St)
  • N Delaware/5th (N Bannock St to W 9th Ave)
  • N Emerson/Pearl (E 3rd Ave to E 20th Ave)

Open House #4 – April 27, 2021

At the fourth open house, the project team unveiled a new community input tool called Konveio and encouraged community members to give feedback on designs for Phase 1 projects that are anticipated to be installed in 2021. The meeting also included a review of Phase 2 project concept surveys and dedicated 1/3 of the meeting time to answering questions from the community. The meeting recording can be viewed by clicking the link below:

Thank you to those that attended the meeting and provided their feedback on Konveio.  The survey is now closed.


Open House #3 – September 24, 2020 

At our third open house we heard more about how community input has shaped bikeway designs in South Central Denver. More than 200 community members attended via live web stream or telephone, with live Spanish-language interpretation offered. A link to the meeting recording and results of the Project Concept Surveys are provided below: 

Thank you to those of you who provided feedback on how you travel by bike, by bus, by car, and on foot in and around Denver via our online map survey tool. Go to the survey, click on a network area, and select “Show Comments” in the upper right to view the feedback your community has shared.


Open House #2 - June 24, 2020 

At our second open house we discussed opportunities to provide input on proposed bikeway concept designs. 


Open House #1 - April 21, 2020 

At our first open house we gave an overview of the project, demonstrated how to use our interactive mapping survey tool (now closed to responses), and answered resident questions. More than 400 community members attended via live web stream or telephone, with live Spanish-language interpretation offered. We also advertised network verification surveys, to make sure we were making investments in the right corridors. A recording of the meeting and results of the network verification surveys are below: 


Corridor Feedback Summary

Review community feedback on bikeway corridors here.