Coordinated Bike Lane Striping & Installation

DOTI is committed to implementing a network of better bike facilities in our city that make it safer, more comfortable and viable for people to ride bikes, and to creating a bike network that connects people to the places they want to go. 

Annually, DOTI efficiently coordinates the installation of bikeways recommended in the Denver Moves: Bicycles Program with annual paving activities. DOTI intends to implement bike lanes in coordination with street repaving efforts, which are scheduled to occur between April and October 2021. Registered Neighborhood Organizations (RNOs) will receive information by email, and flyers will be delivered to properties along the corridor in advance of the repaving work, to notify homeowners and businesses of the changes on the roadway that they will see following paving. 

Want to learn more and participate? Virtual public meetings will be held in February/March to gather public feedback. See “Get Involved” and specific project drop downs for public meeting details.

Project Benefits 

These changes will improve transportation options, making it easier to get to the places that you want to go. Additional benefits include:

  • Safety is the number one priority of these projects. Research indicates adding a protected bike lane to a roadway can reduce the risk of injury up to 90% for all commuters. Benefits of bike lanes for all roadway users include slower speeds, more predictability at intersections, and enhanced safety.
  • The project will provide dedicated space on the street for people on bikes, providing more transportation choice, which helps to manage congestion city-wide.
  • The design will increase comfort of riding and reduce potential conflicts between bicycles and cars.
  • Projects will provide better connections to schools, parks, trails, transit and shopping areas.

FAQ

Have questions? 

Want to see responses to some of the questions asked during the public meetings?  See our Frequently Asked Questions below:


Ongoing Project Details

W Kentucky Avenue from Sheridan Blvd to Vallejo St

Get Involved: The designs for this corridor are complete. Please reach out to bikes@denvergov.org with any questions.

In 2021, a buffered bike lane will be installed to improve safety and connectivity on W Kentucky Ave from Sheridan Blvd to Vallejo St, and the full street will be repaved in 2022. Implementing a buffered bike lane will change the cross-section of the street by removing on-street parking, and will provide a continuous bikeway through the Westwood and Athmar Park neighborhoods.

DOTI held two virtual public meetings for this project.

September 30, 2020

April 15, 2020: At this meeting, the Denver Department of Transportation and Infrastructure presented existing conditions for the corridor (e.g., speed, car volumes, land use) and gathered input on the corridor's current travel patterns. This meeting helped to inform the bikeway design. 


Project Fact Sheet(PDF, 106KB)

Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

W 13th Avenue from N Mariposa to N Decatur St

Get Involved: The designs for this corridor are complete. Please reach out to bikes@denvergov.org with any questions. 

Additional Project Information: Denver will be repaving 13th Ave from the Platte River Trail to Mariposa Ave in early 2021, providing a smooth roadway surface. Once the repaving is complete, Denver will install a protected bike lane along this stretch of roadway.

Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

E Iowa Ave from S Acoma St to S Sherman St (South Central CTN)

Get Involved:

Mobility improvements are planned for E Iowa Ave between Acoma St. and S Sherman St.

DOTI held two Virtual Public Meetings for this project.

February 4, 2021

At this meeting, the project team introduced the Iowa Avenue Bikeway corridor project between Acoma St. and S Sherman St.  They presented the proposed design, answered questions and requested feedback from community members. They also discussed the project schedule and next steps. 

April 27, 2021

At this meeting the project team discussed the upcoming transportation safety project on E Iowa Ave. The team summarized feedback received so far, recapped existing conditions along the corridor and discussed how your comments have helped shape the proposed design.  They also provided information on the project schedule and next steps for the corridor.


Additional Project Information: As part of the South Central Community Transportation Network projects, E Iowa Ave from S Acoma St to S Sherman St is proposed to include a bike lane. The Denver Moves: Bicycles Program includes the recommendation to install a bicycle facility on the corridor. The E Iowa Ave corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2021

Project Fact Sheet - E Iowa Ave

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Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

W 6th Ave/W 8th Ave from N Knox Ct to N Zuni St (West Denver Safer Streets)

Get Involved:

Street safety improvements are planned for W 6th Ave / W 8th Ave from N Knox Ct to N Zuni St.

DOTI held two Virtual Public Meetings for this project.

February 11, 2021

At this meeting, the project team provided information to the community about bikeways and safety improvements in the West Denver Safer Streets area, including W 6th Ave / W 8th Ave from N Knox Ct to N Zuni St, as well as other area streets.  They presented the proposed design, answered questions, and requested feedback from community members. They also discussed the project schedule and next steps.


May 13, 2021

At this meeting, the project team discussed the upcoming transportation safety project on W 6th Ave / W 8th Ave. The team summarized feedback received so far, recapped existing conditions along the corridor and discussed how public comments have helped shape the proposed design.  They also provided information on the project schedule and next steps for the corridor.


Additional Project Information: West 6th/8th Ave between N Knox Ct to N Zuni St is proposed to include a protected bike lane. The Denver Moves: Bicycles Program includes the recommendation to install a bicycle facility on the corridor. The 6th/8th corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2021

Project Fact Sheet and Public Meeting Flyer

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Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

E 51st Ave from N Lincoln St to N Washington St (Washington Area Study)

Mobility improvements are planned for E 51st Ave from N Lincoln St to N Washington St.

DOTI held two Virtual Public Meetings for this project.

February 25, 2021

At this virtual meeting, the project team introduced the vision for bikeways on 51st Ave between N Lincoln St and N Washington St and E 45th Ave from N Broadway to N Washington St, as well as other area streets. They presented the proposed design, answered questions and requested feedback from community members. They also discussed the project schedule and next steps.

April 29, 2021

At this virtual meeting, the project team discussed the upcoming transportation safety project on 51st Ave between N Lincoln St and N Washington St and E 45th Ave from N Broadway to N Washington St.  The project team summarized feedback received so far, recapped existing conditions along the corridor and discussed how your comments have helped shape the proposed design. They also provided information on project schedule and next steps for the corridor.


Additional Project Information: As part of the Washington Area Study projects, E 51st Ave from N Lincoln St to N Washington St is proposed to include a bike lane. The Denver Moves: Bicycles Program includes the recommendation to install a bicycle facility on the corridor. The E 51st Ave corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2021

Project Fact Sheet and Public Meeting Flyer

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Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

E 45th Ave from N Broadway to N Washington St (Washington Area Study)

Mobility improvements are planned for E 51st Ave from N Lincoln St to N Washington St.

DOTI held two Virtual Public Meetings for this project.

February 25, 2021

At this virtual meeting, the project team introduced the vision for bikeways on 51st Ave between N Lincoln St and N Washington St and E 45th Ave from N Broadway to N Washington St, as well as other area streets. They presented the proposed design, answered questions and requested feedback from community members. They also discussed the project schedule and next steps.

April 29, 2021

At this virtual meeting, the project team discussed the upcoming transportation safety project on 51st Ave between N Lincoln St and N Washington St and E 45th Ave from N Broadway to N Washington St.  The project team summarized feedback received so far, recapped existing conditions along the corridor and discussed how your comments have helped shape the proposed design. They also provided information on project schedule and next steps for the corridor.


Additional Project Information: As part of the Washington Area Study projects, E 45th Ave or a parallel route from N Broadway to N Washington St is proposed to include a buffered or protected bike lane. The Denver Moves: Bicycles Program includes the recommendation to install a bicycle facility on the corridor. The E 45th (or parallel) Ave corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2022

Project Fact Sheet and Public Meeting Flyer

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Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

E Buchtel Blvd from S Corona St to S University Blvd (University Neighborhoods Safer Streets)

Get Involved:

Mobility improvements are planned for University Neighborhood Safer Streets along Buchtel Blvd.

DOTI held two Virtual Public Meetings for this project.

March 4, 2021

The project team held the first virtual Public Meeting on March 4th where they discussed existing conditions along E Buchtel Blvd from S Corona St to S University Blvd. They introduced some potential changes to the corridor, as proposed previously in the Denver Moves: Bicycles Program and other previous plans.  Feedback from community members was requested. The project team provided information on the project schedule and next steps for the corridor.

May 20, 2021 

At this virtual meeting, the project team discussed the upcoming transportation safety project on E Buchtel Blvd from S Corona St to S University Blvd. The project team summarized feedback received so far, recapped existing conditions along the corridor and discussed how your comments have helped shape the proposed design. They also provided information on project schedule and next steps for the corridor. 


Additional Project Information: As part of the University Neighborhoods Safer Streets projects, E Buchtel Blvd from S Corona St to S University Blvd is proposed to include a protected bike lane. The Denver Moves: Bicycles Program includes the recommendation to install a bicycle facility on the corridor. The E Buchtel Blvd corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2021

Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

N Gray St from W 49th Ave to W 52nd Ave (Northwest CTN)

Get Involved:

Mobility improvements are planned for N Gray St from W 49th Ave to W 52nd Ave.

DOTI held two Virtual Public Meetings for this project.

March 11, 2021

At this meeting, the project team discussed existing conditions on N Harlan St / N Gray St between E 49th Ave and E 52nd Ave. They introduced some potential changes to the corridor, as proposed previously in the Denver Moves: Bicycles Program and other previous plans. They also provided information on the project schedule, additional opportunities for input, and next steps for the corridor.

May 6, 2021

At this meeting, the project team discussed the upcoming transportation safety project on N Harlan St / N Gray St between E 49th Ave and E 52nd Ave. The team summarized feedback received so far, recapped existing conditions along the corridor, and discussed how public comments have helped shape the proposed design.  They also provided information on project schedule and next steps for the corridor.


Additional Project Information: 

N Harlan St / N Gray St from W 49th Ave to W 52nd Ave is proposed to include a striped bike lane. The Denver Moves: Bicycles Program includes the recommendation to install a bicycle facility on the corridor. The corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program. 

Construction Planned: 2021

Project Fact Sheet and Public Meeting Flyer

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Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

N Dallas St from E 51st Ave to E 56th Ave (NE Denver Mobility Projects)

Get Involved:

Mobility improvements are planned for N Dallas St from E 51st Ave to E 56th Ave.

DOTI held two Virtual Public Meetings for this project.

March 16, 2021

This meeting was focused on E 51st Ave (from N Central Park Blvd to N Havana St), E 53rd Ave (from N Chambers Rd to Memphis St), with an update regarding N Dallas St (from E 51st Ave to E 56th Ave). At this meeting, the project team discussed existing conditions along the corridors and introduced some potential changes to the corridor, as proposed previously in the Denver Moves: Bicycles Program and other previous plans. They also provided information on the project schedule, additional opportunities for input, and next steps for the corridor.

May 11, 2021

At this meeting, the project team discussed the upcoming transportation safety project on 51st Ave (between Central Park Blvd and Havana St), as well as 53rd Ave (between N Chambers Rd and Trail). A brief update was provided regarding N Dallas St (from E 51st Ave to E 56th Ave). The team summarized feedback received so far, recapped existing conditions along the corridors and discussed how public comments have helped shape the proposed design.  They also provided information on the project schedule and next steps for the corridors.


Additional Project Information: As part of the NE Denver Mobility Projects, N Dallas St from E 51st Ave to E 56th Ave is proposed to include a buffered bike lane. The Denver Moves: Bicycles Program includes the recommendation to install a bicycle facility on the corridor. The N Dallas St corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2021

Project Fact Sheet and Public Meeting Flyer

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Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

Andrews Dr from Peoria St to Crown Blvd (NE Denver Mobility Projects)

Get Involved: The designs for this corridor are complete. Please reach out to bikes@denvergov.org with any questions.

Additional Project Information: As part of the Montbello Safer Streets projects, Andrews Dr from Peoria St to Crown Blvd will replace one travel lane in each direction with a protected bike lane. The Andrews Dr corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2021

Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

E 51st Ave from N Uvalda St to N Chambers Rd (NE Denver Mobility Projects)

Get Involved: The designs for this corridor are complete. Please reach out to bikes@denvergov.org with any questions. 

Additional Project Information: As part of the Montbello Safer Streets projects, E 51st Ave from N Uvalda St to N Chambers Rd will replace one travel lane in each direction with a protected bike lane. The E 51st Ave corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2021

Project Fact Sheet and Public Meeting Flyer

Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

E 53rd Ave from N Chambers Rd to Memphis St (NE Denver Mobility Projects)

Get Involved:

Mobility improvements are planned for E 53rd Ave from N Chambers Rd to Memphis St.

DOTI held two Virtual Public Meetings for this project.

March 16, 2021

This meeting was focused on E 51st Ave (from N Central Park Blvd to N Havana St), E 53rd Ave (from N Chambers Rd to Memphis St), with an update regarding N Dallas St (from E 51st Ave to E 56th Ave). At this meeting, the project team discussed existing conditions along the corridors and introduced some potential changes to the corridor, as proposed previously in the Denver Moves: Bicycles Program and other previous plans. They also provided information on the project schedule, additional opportunities for input, and next steps for the corridor.

May 11, 2021

At this meeting, the project team discussed the upcoming transportation safety project on 51st Ave (between Central Park Blvd and Havana St), as well as 53rd Ave (between N Chambers Rd and Trail). A brief update was provided regarding N Dallas St (from E 51st Ave to E 56th Ave). The team summarized feedback received so far, recapped existing conditions along the corridors and discussed how public comments have helped shape the proposed design.  They also provided information on the project schedule and next steps for the corridors.


Additional Project Information: As part of the NE Denver Mobility Projects, E 53rd Ave from N Chambers Rd to Memphis St is proposed to include a bike lane. The Denver Moves: Bicycles Program includes the recommendation to install a bicycle facility on the corridor. The E 53rd Ave corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2021

Project Fact Sheet and Public Meeting Flyer

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Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

E 51st Ave from N Central Park Blvd to N Havana St (NE Denver Mobility Projects)

Get Involved:

Mobility improvements are planned for E 51st Ave from N Central Park Blvd to N Havana St.

DOTI held two Virtual Public Meetings for this project.

March 16, 2021

This meeting was focused on E 51st Ave (from N Central Park Blvd to N Havana St), E 53rd Ave (from N Chambers Rd to Memphis St), with an update regarding N Dallas St (from E 51st Ave to E 56th Ave). At this meeting, the project team discussed existing conditions along the corridors and introduced some potential changes to the corridor, as proposed previously in the Denver Moves: Bicycles Program and other previous plans. They also provided information on the project schedule, additional opportunities for input, and next steps for the corridor.

May 11, 2021

At this meeting, the project team discussed the upcoming transportation safety project on 51st Ave (between Central Park Blvd and Havana St), as well as 53rd Ave (between N Chambers Rd and Trail). A brief update was provided regarding N Dallas St (from E 51st Ave to E 56th Ave). The team summarized feedback received so far, recapped existing conditions along the corridors and discussed how public comments have helped shape the proposed design.  They also provided information on the project schedule and next steps for the corridors.


Additional Project Information: As part of the NE Denver Mobility Projects, E 51st Ave from N Central Park Blvd to N Havana St is proposed to include a buffered bike lane. The Denver Moves: Bicycles Program includes the recommendation to install a bicycle facility on the corridor. The E 51st Ave corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2021

Project Fact Sheet and Public Meeting Flyer

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Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

N Holly St from E 48th Ave to E 35th Ave (NE Park Hill Mobility Projects)

Get Involved:

Mobility improvements are planned for N Holly St from E 48th Ave to E 35th Ave.

DOTI held two Virtual Public Meetings for this project.

February 24, 2021

The project team held the first public meeting on February 24th where we discussed existing conditions along the corridor and introduced some potential changes to the corridor, as proposed previously in the Denver Moves: Bicycles Program and other previous plans. We also provided information on the project schedule, additional opportunities for input, and next steps for the corridor.


May 18, 2021

During this virtual public meeting, the project team discussed the upcoming transportation safety project on 35th Ave from N Dahlia St to N Quebec St, as well as N Dahlia St from E 39th Ave to E 35th Ave. An update of N Holly St from E 48th Ave to E 35th Ave was provided.  The team summarized feedback received so far, recapped existing conditions along the corridor, and discuss how public feedback has helped shape the proposed design.  The team also provided information on the project schedule and next steps for the corridor.

Upcoming meeting information will be posted here.


Additional Project Information: As part of the N Park Hill Mobility projects, N Holly St from E 48th Ave to E 35th Ave is proposed to include a bike lane (portions neighborhood bikeway). The Denver Moves: Bicycles Program includes the recommendation to install a bicycle facility on the corridor. The N Holly St corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2022

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Project Fact Sheet and Public Meeting Flyer

Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

E 35th Ave from N Dahlia St to N Quebec St (NE Park Hill Mobility Projects)

Get Involved:

Mobility improvements are planned for E 35th Ave from N Dahlia St to N Quebec St.

DOTI held two Virtual Public Meetings for this project.

February 24, 2021

The project team held the first public meeting on February 24th where we discussed existing conditions along the corridor and introduced some potential changes to the corridor, as proposed previously in the Denver Moves: Bicycles Program and other previous plans. We also provided information on the project schedule, additional opportunities for input, and next steps for the corridor.


May 18, 2021

During this virtual public meeting, the project team discussed the upcoming transportation safety project on 35th Ave from N Dahlia St to N Quebec St, as well as N Dahlia St from E 39th Ave to E 35th Ave. An update of N Holly St from E 48th Ave to E 35th Ave was provided.  The team summarized feedback received so far, recapped existing conditions along the corridor, and discuss how public feedback has helped shape the proposed design.  The team also provided information on the project schedule and next steps for the corridor.

Upcoming meeting information will be posted here.


Additional Project Information: As part of the N Park Hill Mobility Projects, E 35th Ave from N Dahlia St to N Quebec St is proposed to include a bike lane. The Denver Moves: Bicycles Program includes the recommendation to install a bicycle facility on the corridor. The E 35th Ave corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2021

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Project Fact Sheet and Public Meeting Flyer

Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

N Dahlia St from E 39th Ave to E 35th Ave (NE Park Hill Mobility Projects)

Get Involved:

Mobility improvements are planned for N Dahlia St from E 39th Ave to E 35th Ave.

DOTI held two Virtual Public Meetings for this project.

February 24, 2021

The project team held the first public meeting on February 24th where we discussed existing conditions along the corridor and introduced some potential changes to the corridor, as proposed previously in the Denver Moves: Bicycles Program and other previous plans. We also provided information on the project schedule, additional opportunities for input, and next steps for the corridor.


May 18, 2021

During this virtual public meeting, the project team discussed the upcoming transportation safety project on 35th Ave from N Dahlia St to N Quebec St, as well as N Dahlia St from E 39th Ave to E 35th Ave. An update of N Holly St from E 48th Ave to E 35th Ave was provided.  The team summarized feedback received so far, recapped existing conditions along the corridor, and discuss how public feedback has helped shape the proposed design.  The team also provided information on the project schedule and next steps for the corridor.

Upcoming meeting information will be posted here.


Additional Project Information: As part of the N Park Hill Mobility Projects, N Dahlia St from E 39th Ave/N Dahlia St intersection to E 35th Ave is proposed to include a bike lane.  The Denver Moves: Bicycles Program includes the recommendation to install a bicycle facility on the corridor. The N Dahlia St corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2022

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Project Fact Sheet and Public Meeting Flyer

Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

S Zuni St from W Jewell Ave to W Dartmouth Ave (Denver / Englewood)

Get Involved:

Street safety improvements are planned for S Zuni St from W Jewell Ave to W Dartmouth Ave.

DOTI 
held two Virtual Public Meetings for this project.

February 25, 2021

The Denver Department of Infrastructure (DOTI) and City of Englewood held the first virtual Public Meeting for the S Zuni St Bikeway corridor, from W Jewell Ave to W Dartmouth Ave. The project teams discussed existing conditions along the corridor and introduced some potential changes to the corridor, as proposed previously in the Denver Moves: Bicycles ProgramEnglewood's Walk and Wheel Plan, and other previous plans. Project staff answered questions from community members throughout the meeting. They also provided information on project schedule, additional opportunities for input, and next steps for the corridor. 


June 17, 2021

At this virtual Public Meeting, the Denver Department of Transportation and Infrastructure (DOTI) and City of Englewood project teams discussed the upcoming transportation safety project on S Zuni St, from W Jewell Ave to W Dartmouth Ave. The teams summarized feedback received so far, recapped existing conditions along the corridor, and discussed how public comments have helped shape the proposed design.  They also provided information on project schedule and next steps for the corridor. 


Additional Project Information: As part of the Denver / Englewood projects, S Zuni St from W Jewell Ave to W Dartmouth Ave is proposed to include a buffered bike lane. The Denver Moves: Bicycles Program includes the recommendation to install a bicycle facility on the corridor. The S Zuni St corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2021

Project Fact Sheet and Public Meeting Flyer

Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers

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N Zuni St from W 46th Ave to W 52nd Ave

Open House #1 - May 11, 2021

virtual open house for N Zuni St was held May 11, 2021 and meeting videos have been posted below. 


Additional Project Information: The city has identified N Zuni St (W 46th Ave to 52nd Ave) as a proposed bike lane in two city-wide planning efforts, Denver Moves: Bicycles and Blueprint Denver. Corridor changes will be installed through the DOTI Bike Paving Program.

Construction Planned: 2021

Frequently Asked Questions

Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers


Frequently Asked Questions

If your question is not answered on this page under the Ongoing Project Details sections, or the Frequently Asked Questions below, view the Corridor-Specific Questions and Answers page here.

If you still have questions after reviewing these resources, please email bikes@denvergov.org. To speak directly with the DOTI Project Manager, sign up for Office Hours in the Ongoing Project Details sections. 

How will safety be impacted? How will vehicle speeds be reduced to provide safety for bike lane users? How will these projects help lower speeds along the corridors and surrounding areas?

Safety is our number one priority!  Research from cities across the U.S. (including Denver) demonstrates that cities with more high-quality bike infrastructure have 44% fewer traffic deaths and injuries overall. In addition to enhanced bikeways, these improvements will include other types of transportation safety features where possible: intersection improvements, safer pedestrian crossings and other ways to get us closer to zero traffic related fatalities and serious injuries. 

When bike lanes are installed, the vehicular travel lanes are visually narrowed (i.e., feel narrower to a person driving). This  helps slow drivers down and contributes to safety. Other design elements (including improved pedestrian crossings and “daylighting” – increasing visibility turning to and from side streets by pulling parking back from intersections) also slow vehicle traffic, improve visibility, or both. Additionally, Denver has a Vision Zero Action Plan with a goal of eliminating all traffic-related deaths and serious injuries on Denver’s roadways by 2030.  As part of Denver’s Vision Zero efforts, DOTI is conducting a city-wide speed mitigation study to identify streets where the posted speed limit can be lowered. These bike paving corridors may be evaluated and selected for speed reduction during this process.

Will bike lanes increase traffic congestion?

DOTI studies each roadway carefully, and the improvements are designed to maximize safety and satisfy specific design guidelines. For example, DOTI has criteria that dictates how many lanes are required for a particular volume of vehicular traffic to ensure that changes do not cause large travel delays.  Overall, there is not always enough right-of-way to accommodate all street uses safely, which leads to tradeoffs. With safety as a design priority, it may mean that street features such as parking, curbside use, turn lanes, and in rare cases a travel lane may need to be repurposed to improve safety for the most vulnerable road users.

How will safety at busy or unsafe intersections be addressed?

DOTI studies each intersection carefully, and the improvements are designed to maximize safety and satisfy specific design guidelines. For example, the DOTI has criteria that dictates when turn lanes can be repurposed based on vehicle traffic volume to ensure removal does not cause large travel delays. Overall, there is not always enough right-of-way to accommodate all street uses safely, which leads to tradeoffs. With safety as a design priority, it may mean that street features such as parking, curbside use, or turn lanes may need to be repurposed to improve safety for the most vulnerable road users.

How will you ensure that these designs for bike lanes are meeting the needs of local neighborhoods? What community outreach has been conducted for this project? How are residents notified?

The community helped identify and confirm where bikeways should go through the robust Denver Moves: Bicycles planning process in 2011 and 2015, and Blueprint Denver in 2019. 

DOTI uses technical analysis and design criteria to confirm the design of each of these corridors and works at multiple levels with the community to ensure the planned designs meet the needs of local neighborhoods. To gather input, DOTI will host at least one virtual open house for each of these corridors and work with community representatives through stakeholder and small group meetings. To get the word out, DOTI:

  • Sends mailers to residents along each impacted street to inform them of open houses and construction.
  • Puts up yard signs in the impacted neighborhoods
  • Encourages stakeholders to reach out to their connections to inform them of upcoming public meetings.
  • Sends out email notifications to all area residents for whom we have email addresses
  • Maintains survey links and additional information about each project on the project website (bit.ly/DenverBikePaving)

What are the criteria for selecting a specific bikeway facility type for each corridor?

DOTI developed the Denver Bikeway Design Manual that provides criteria for facility (bikeway type) selection based on variables like vehicle traffic volumes, number of traffic lanes, and vehicle speeds. Through the planning and design process, DOTI determines whether the bikeway facility proposed in Denver Moves Bikes (2011) aligns with the facility type criteria outlined in the design manual.

What are the different types of bikeways? Can you describe what a high comfort bikeway is and how that makes it safer for families?

Comfort Level chart of various bikeway types from low to high  

A high comfort bikeway provides a more comfortable ride for people of all skill levels on a bicycle, and greater predictability for all roadway users, compared to traditional bike lanes or “sharrow” streets.  Of the 125 miles of bike lanes DOTI is installing by the end of 2023, the majority will be considered high comfort facilities. 

High comfort bikeways include protected bike lanes as well as neighborhood bikeways. Protected bike lanes are dedicated bikeways on streets that have both a horizontal and vertical buffer between a person bicycling and motor vehicles. These facilities better organize the roadway so that people who ride bikes have dedicated space to travel safely.  Neighborhood Bikeways are low-stress, low-volume shared streets that use design elements to prioritize pedestrian and bicycle movement and encourage appropriate vehicular speeds. 

A high comfort bikeway is where you and your family would feel comfortable riding your bike, which means that you have space and freedom to get where you need to go. There are criteria for maximum speed and traffic volumes which dictate where high comfort bikeways are installed. Traffic calming and speed reduction measures are taken to make them safer and more comfortable.

How has street parking data been collected? Does it include weekends?

DOTI collects street parking data by counting the number of vehicles parked on each block face. The data is collected at a time when the parking is anticipated to be most highly used: for residential areas that might be early on a weekday morning, or for commercial areas it might be around mid-morning. Once the count is complete, DOTI calculates the available parking supply and occupancy rate.

Is there enough bicycle volume to justify a bike lane?

It’s hard to judge the demand for a specific bicycle facility by measuring bicycle volumes in that location because bicyclists of every age and comfort level might not want to use a particular road until a facility is built that provides a safe place to ride. For example, we don’t judge the need for a bridge based on how many people are swimming across a river.  The layout and type of bicycle facilities have been determined during the 2011 and 2015 Denver Moves planning process, where the entire City of Denver was evaluated at one time to develop a comprehensive and connected bike network citywide. Each project might not generate large volumes of bicycles on its own, but every piece is part of a complete transportation system that will attract bicyclists, improve safety for everyone, and increase mode share (percentage of people riding bicycles and walking), creating a more balanced, sustainable transportation network over time.

Have the impacts to school drop-off zones along the corridor been considered?

Yes, where school drop-off zones are present along the study corridors, DOTI planners and designers are working with school facilities and administration staff to design a roadway that accommodates school needs and is safe for all roadway users.

Will on-street parking be removed and what compromises can be made for resident parking? What if side street parking isn’t sufficient?

We are working closely with the DOTI Curbside & Parking team in areas where we anticipate parking impacts to evaluate curbside management strategies. The concept designs take these needs into account along each specific corridor. All designs will evaluate factors including the measured parking utilization, availability of driveways/garages and side street parking, the needs of all road users, land use context, the presence of businesses or institutional uses (like schools or parks), and strategies to maximize safety for all users.  If a resident needs accessible parking on the street, please apply for an ADA parking space (accessibleparking@denvergov.org) so that DOTI engineers can plan for and accommodate the ADA space needs in the design.  If a resident or business has regular (landscapers, for example) or one-time (home renovation, for example) additional parking needs, those needs may be met using driveway parking, side street parking, or by applying for a permit to close the bike lane (contact DOTI for more information).

Is it safer to switch parking and bike lanes so that the bike lanes are next to the curb and protected by parked cars?

While it can be safer to position bicyclists next to the curb and protected by parked cars (known as a “parking-protected bike lane”), the street needs to be wide enough for this design to work safely.  People on bikes have to be able to safely pass parked cars and crews need to be able to clear bike lanes of snow and debris. Often, the street just isn’t wide enough. The design team considers roadway speed, vehicular volumes, and type of roadway as well as parking supply and demand to make this decision.

Have the bikeways been designed to help make connections to community assets, like public transit and schools?

The layout and type of bicycle facilities were initially determined during the 2011 and 2015 Denver Moves Bikes planning process, where the entire City of Denver was evaluated at once to develop a comprehensive and connected bike network citywide. Connections to existing community assets is one of the most important evaluation criteria used when selecting and proposing bikeway locations.  Where people live, work, learn, play, and access transit were taken into consideration when choosing the corridors.

Can we have more streets dedicated to bikes and pedestrians? Is there a plan to update Denver Moves Bikes and increase the number of bike-friendly routes in the future?

Guided by Denver Moves: Bicycles Program and other citywide plans that focus on improving transportation choice for people moving around Denver, we are leading with the implementation of bikeways between Summer/Fall 2020 and 2023. Through this process, Denver will increase the number of households within ¼ mile of a high comfort bikeway and provide more residents with an alternative transportation option. One priority of this process is to identify a multimodal network that encourages mode shift to increase the percentage of people using bicycles, public transit, and walking for their commutes to 30%. 

As far as increasing the number of bike-friendly routes in the city, DOTI is working on planning and design activities in three areas of the city right now through “Community Transportation Networks” (more information here) and plans to address other areas of the city immediately after that.  In addition, any time a roadway is planned to be repaved as part of DOTI’s standard repaving protocol, DOTI evaluates the street for the potential to implement any future bikeway proposed in Denver’s adopted planning documents.   Any mobility concerns noted by the public that can’t be addressed as part of the current project due to scope, timeline, or budget are passed on to the appropriate DOTI staff member so that those concerns can be addressed through other projects as quickly as possible.

What is the timeline for completing these proposed improvements? Especially in light of small business and COVID concerns:

We know now is a very difficult time for everyone in Denver, especially for small businesses who are some of the hardest hit by this pandemic.  Construction for the “coordinated paving” projects is planned between April 2021 and October 2021.  We will work with our paving crews to provide the shortest construction schedule possible (usually just a couple of days), and will also provide businesses and residents along the corridor advanced information on paving schedule and parking or access impacts.

Can you tell me more of history on these bike lanes and how are they funded?

Denver residents decided on a vision for the city’s complete bikeway network in 2011 (Denver Moves: Bikes). In 2019, the citywide land use and transportation plan (Blueprint Denver) identified bicycle priority streets. These plans outline where and what types of bikeways Denver should install to create a complete, connected, safe, and comfortable bikeway system in Denver, allowing transportation mode choice for all residents including those who don’t own a car. 

There are three primary strategies for choosing when to install bikeways from these plans: Networks (build out Denver’s bikeway network by concentrating investment in one area at a time), Backbones (install bikeways to provide critical connections within and between network areas), and Coordinated with Paving (coordinate the striping of bike lanes with already-planned street paving operations to install facilities efficiently). 

The funding sources for each of these strategies is different, as some funding comes from the Elevate Denver Bond passed in 2016 providing funding for many of the high comfort bikeways currently in design and construction.  The bike lanes being coordinated with paving projects use paving budget already allocated to restriping the roadway after already-planned paving projects.

How do I provide feedback about other areas for improvements or get answers to my specific questions?

The best way to provide input at this time is to email DOTI at denvermoves@denvergov.org and leave your comment or suggestion.   Please also watch the Coordinated Bike Paving website for public meeting information and opportunities to fill out surveys on these corridors.

What criteria are used to select streets for paving? Can you add to the scope of this project by including curb ramps, sidewalk, or pedestrian crossing improvements?

Denver selects streets for paving based on a number of factors including pavement condition, traffic volume, length of time since the last re-paving, and anticipated needs in the future. Once a street is selected for paving it is possible to make certain changes to the street layout (such as moving the striping, adding or removing parking, installing bike lanes, etc.) for little or no additional cost. 

Unfortunately, these projects are generally not budgeted for other, more costly improvements such as adding or expanding sidewalks, adding or improving lighting, or correcting drainage issues, as improvements are limited to that which can be accomplished with striping/paint and signs.  However, DOTI does collect input about additional transportation and infrastructure needs and communicates the input to the related department to determine the most appropriate way to quickly address these needs, whether it be through Denver’s sidewalk program or another method.

What is meant by “interested but concerned” bicyclists?

59% of bicyclists are “Interested but Concerned” (people who like to ride or want to ride more but worry about safety, particularly on roadways without bicycle facilities)


This term comes from research conducted several years ago both in Denver and across the country about different types of people who ride bicycles. It turns out that people generally fall into one of four categories: “Strong and Fearless” (those who are comfortable and willing to ride on any type of road), “Enthused and Confident” (people who regularly commute, run errands, or ride for fun, and are comfortable on most types of roads but not all), “Interested but Concerned” (people who like to ride or want to ride more but worry about safety, particularly on roadways without bicycle facilities) and “No Way, No How” (those who would not ride at all regardless of the type of bicycle facility).
 

Research shows that about 50-65% of Denver residents are “Interested but Concerned” riders: people who probably own a bike or have in the past and like to ride, or want to ride more, but feel concerned for their safety and need better facilities to do so. Many cities focus on making streets feel safer and more inviting for the “interested but concerned” rider to increase the number of people bicycling and to provide safe, comfortable roadways for the highest number of people possible.