Project Tracking

Check out the new projects and upgrades coming to the city. Learn more about each project by reviewing the project summary sheets below. 

Transportation and Mobility

16th Street Mall Improvement Project

The 16th Street Mall Project is a strategic and coordinated effort to steward the Mall and secure its future success with a design to address deteriorating infrastructure, provide equitable and sufficient space for high-quality public gathering opportunities, improve pedestrian and vehicle safety, and continue the reliable two-way transitway. 


56th Avenue

This project will widen 56th Avenue between Peoria Street and Peña Boulevard into a four-lane divided multimodal roadway to improve safety and enhance transit services. It also completes the multiuse bike and pedestrian trail between Peoria Street and Peña Boulevard with connections to neighborhood bike paths and the Arsenal trail system. These improvements are expected to decrease congestion and significantly reduce crashes along the corridor.


47th and York Bike Pedestrian Bridge

After extensive studies and community input, the 47th and York Bike Pedestrian Bridge was constructed over the Union Pacific Railroad tracks in the Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods. Previously, frequent trains caused both delays and dangerous crossings for residents getting to and from their destination. The bridge brings critical mobility improvements and pedestrian connectivity to these neighborhoods.


Citywide Sidewalk Construction

As part of Denver’s larger citywide sidewalk program, the Citywide Sidewalk Gap program will improve pedestrian infrastructure in neighborhoods with missing sidewalks around the city, creating a safer walking, running and multi-modal environment. New locations will be constructed in accordance with the Denver Moves: Pedestrians and Trails plan, focusing on and near streets with high levels of crashes (the City’s Vision Zero High Injury Network), filling in gaps near transit connections, and creating new connections to important community destinations, such as schools, parks and grocery stores. This program will be phased throughout the bond’s lifetime.


Citywide Bike Infrastructure

Denver is improving its roadways to move more people safely and efficiently through the city, and is working to complete networks that offer people more options to get around town in ways that meet their day-to-day needs. As part of this effort, Denver is accelerating implementation of its citywide bike plan, Denver Moves: Bikes. This project will devote $18 million to installing new bikeways over the next five years. Installation is being phased throughout the bond’s lifetime.


Park Avenue Bridge

  • The Park Avenue Bridge is a major gateway to downtown Denver and Coors Field. The first phase of this effort to preserve and extend the life of the bridge was an emergency bearing replacement project completed in August 2019.
  • Construction is now underway for phases II/III of the project (these phases were consolidated in a single contract) include expansion joint replacement, deck repairs, signal replacement, asphalt overlay, concrete repair, and painting of the steel girders and handrails. Extensive coordination with UPRR, BNSF, and RTD is required. This includes a “bus bridge” for RTD on the gold line and flagging. Work will occur only Oct-March to avoid interfering with Coors Field traffic for Rockies games.
  • Phase IV work items (not included in the Elevate Bond program) will address the Delgany and Wewatta portions of the viaduct.
  • Lane closures will vary and be phased to limit traffic impacts, although construction activities may not necessarily be visible from the roadway.

  • Visit the project webpage

Broadway Corridor Multimodal Improvements

This project repurposes existing city right-of-way with multimodal improvements to prioritize the movement of people for safety and economic benefits. It includes design and construction of a two-way protected bike lane, traffic signal and curb ramp reconstruction, transitway and bus stop enhancements, on-street parking and loading zones, and ways to incorporate transportation network companies (taxi and rideshare operators).


Deferred Maintenance - Paving

This citywide program focuses on arterial and collector road repaving and curb and gutter improvements. This project ensures that neighborhoods across the city will see major asphalt paving and concrete work occur, fixing potholes, improving traffic flow, and reducing wear and tear on vehicles. Along with addressing hundreds of lane miles of paving needs on arterial and collector streets, the repaving effort will be phased to coordinate with other major projects such as utility work, multimodal improvements or other bicycle route expansion projects. 


Deferred Maintenance - Bridges

 This citywide program includes major bridge replacement and rehabilitation. Some of the bridges we drive across every day need to be repaired or replaced. This project will repair and replace aging bridges to ensure they are safe for decades to come.

This portion of the program includes eight bridges. Those currently under construction or completed are Park Ave (under construction) and 14th Avenue over Cherry Creek (completed). The other bridge projects in various levels of development are: Speer over Little Raven, Speer over Platte, Quebec over Airlawn, Monaco over Cherry Creek, 8th Avenue Viaduct, and Smith Road over Quebec.


Globeville Elyria-Swansea Pedestrian Connectivity Improvements

The Globeville and Elyria-Swansea neighborhoods lack basic pedestrian and mobility infrastructure, including sidewalks, curb and gutter, ADA ramps and bicycle facilities. The current fragmented sidewalk network leaves significant gaps and creates unsafe routes for residents, children and employees.

These improvements include new construction of sidewalk, crosswalk, curb and gutter, and bicycle facilities. Improvements will focus on key access and connectivity to schools, libraries, community services and transit (bus stops and rail stations). In certain locations, improvements may include stormwater and drainage improvements.

  • Read the project summary (coming soon!)

Yale Station Pedestrian Safety

Pedestrian access to the Regional Transportation District’s (RTD) Yale Station from the residential neighborhood to its south was limited and the heavy traffic on Yale Avenue made it difficult for bus drivers to turn onto the access road to the station. This project, completed in December 2020, addresses both these problems.


Buchtel & Colorado Blvd Intersection Improvements

This project includes converting Buchtel Boulevard from University Boulevard to Colorado Boulevard into a more complete street and improving four intersections along University and Colorado. This project consists of protected bike lanes, bicycle and pedestrian crossings, enhanced lighting, wayfinding, and major intersection realignment and reconstruction. The project also includes bicycle and pedestrian improvements to connect to the Colorado Station bicycle and pedestrian bridge, as identified on Denver Moves Bicycles.


8th Avenue Over Platte Bridge Reconstruction

This project includes the removal and replacement of the existing aging 8th Avenue Bridge over the South Platte River. The replacement structure will include increased lane width to alleviate rapid vehicular lane shifting and added multiuse sidewalks.


Alameda Ave. Underpass Replacement

The existing Alameda Avenue underpass was built in 1910 with rail bridges crossing over Alameda. This is a critical east/west connection for vehicles and pedestrians with the nearest grade-separated rail line crossings at Mississippi Avenue and 6th Avenue. This project will stabilize the structure and make ADA improvements. The project will include a new grade-separated, ADA-compliant sidewalk/multiuse path along the north side of Alameda. The project will stabilize deteriorating wall sections. Even with this work, the entire underpass will need replacement in the future as part of a future bond program or other significant funding opportunity. 


Colfax Corridor Improvements

Project information coming soon.


Connecting Auraria

Auraria Campus houses the University of Colorado Denver, Community College of Denver and Metropolitan State University of Denver. The sidewalks along the Larimer Street bridge over Cherry Creek are narrow and do not support the high volume of pedestrian traffic that regularly uses Larimer Street to connect between downtown Denver and the campus. This project will improve the pedestrian experience and safety on Larimer Street between 14th Street and the Auraria Campus. It includes full reconstruction of the bridge over Cherry Creek to accommodate a larger pedestrian and amenity zone. It will address the non-ADA-compliant ramps at the bridge approach and at two Larimer Street and Speer Boulevard intersections, resolve a problematic drainage issue, and relocate signal system infrastructure. Additional improvements include landscaping and mobility enhancements. 


Hampden Corridor Multimodal Improvements

This project brings improvements including high-visibility crosswalks, pedestrian signage, median refuges, signalization improvements and transit amenities. This suite of pedestrian improvements will serve as the foundation for future corridor transformation. There is broad support for infrastructure that transforms the function of this corridor from the community and elected officials. The project is divided into two phases. Phase I includes improvements currently being constructed by CDOT. This includes Hampden Avenue pedestrian improvements, as well as pedestrian crossing improvements. Phase I also includes the installation of a signalized pedestrian crossing at the Hampden/Verbena intersection. Phase II constructs additional improvements identified in the Hampden Avenue Corridor Study completed in 2021. 


Jewell/Evans Station Bike/Pedestrian Bridge

This project includes design and construction of a bicycle and pedestrian bridge that spans US-85/Santa Fe Drive and the southwest rail system. It provides critical regional bike and pedestrian trail linkage and east-west connectivity between transportation and recreational resources. Neighborhoods to the east (Overland, Platte Park, Rosedale, University, Washington Park) will have access to the South Platte River Trail/Ruby Hill Park and neighborhoods to the west (Overland, Ruby Hill, College View and southwest Denver) will have access to the RTD Evans Station. 


W. 13th Avenue Multimodal Reconstruction

The W 13th Avenue reconstruction project will support the redevelopment of Sun Valley, particularly by advancing the reconstruction of 13th Avenue and other improvements to connect Sun Valley to Downtown and surrounding neighborhoods, provide safe and convenient routes/facilities for all modes, support community vitality, enhance 13th Avenue, complete Bryant St between 12th and 13th Avenue, and Holden Place as green connections to parks and trails, support economic development, and allow for the timely completion of DHA’s revitalization/reconstruction of the neighborhood.


West Colfax Transit Enhancements

West Colfax Avenue has 6,000 weekday RTD transit riders, two elementary schools and redevelopments adding residential and business density. This project will improve pedestrian crossings and transit efficiency/reliability. In coordination with RTD, Denver has identified locations to enhance transit operations with elements that may include bus bulb-outs, transit bypass lanes and traffic signal/bus stop modifications. The project was awarded additional funding by the Colorado Department of Transportation through its Safer Main Streets program which will allow it to address all the cross streets within the project limits which are Irving to Sheridan. 


Washington Street Reconstruction

Washington Street serves as the entrance to the National Western Center, connection to I-70 and Brighton Boulevard and the 38th & Blake Station, a link to Adams County and main street to the Globeville Neighborhood.  This project includes full roadway reconstruction of Washington Street from 47th Avenue to the City and County of Denver line at 52nd Avenue. Elements include improvements supporting pedestrian and bicycle mobility, and utility work required as a part of reconstruction. Acquisition of additional right-of-way is anticipated. 


Central Street Promenade

Project information coming soon.


Federal Boulevard Pedestrian Improvements

This project will design and construct improvements within one block of Federal Boulevard between W 23rd and W 27th avenues. The project is to address:

  1. Uncomfortable and dangerous crossings for pedestrians at both controlled and uncontrolled intersections
  2. Inconsistent pedestrian lighting
  3. Poor bus stop amenities/locations
  4. Speeding vehicles
  5. Limited Business Improvement District pedestrian amenities
  6.  A car-centric environment in a high pedestrian use area.

This project has received additional funds from the Colorado Department of Transportation’s Safer Main Street program which will allow it to address each of the intersections between W 23rd and W 27th avenues.


High Line Canal Connections

The current High Line Canal alignment requires trail users to cross an undersized bridge sidewalk and at-grade crossing of Yale Avenue. This project will construct a new grade-separated underpass for the High Line Canal trail at Yale Avenue, just west of Holly Street. Improvements for this crossing were identified by Arapahoe County in the 2014 Feasibility Study for High Line Canal Crossings. Separate High Line Canal underpass projects that are not within the Elevate Bond program are also being done at Mississippi Avenue/Parker Road and Colorado Boulevard/Hampden Avenue.


Morrison Road Improvements

Morrison Road is the main corridor for the Westwood neighborhood. The purpose of the Morrison Road Improvement project is to reconstruct the right-of-way on Morrison Road between Perry Street and Nevada Avenue and perform intersection improvements at Ohio, Wolff, and Yates to improve pedestrian safety, bring these areas to City and ADA standards, and reduce traffic speed in order to improve the health, sustainability and economic vitality of the corridor.


Yale Avenue Improvements (I-25 to Quebec)

Project information coming soon.

Cultural Facilities

Denver Art Museum - North Building Renovation and Transportation Improvements

The Denver Art Museum (DAM) is renovating the North Building to improve safety, accessibility and infrastructure. Improvements include enlarged backup generator, improved environmental and electrical controls, pre-action sprinkler system, upgraded exiting systems on gallery floors, new family restrooms, two new passenger elevators with ADA-upgraded cars and upgraded existing elevators. A new welcome center will be built to improve connections between museum buildings. Improvements include expanded lower courtyard, lengthened bus lane, elliptical garden and folded lawn, extended property line wall, new paving and planting along Acoma Plaza, new outdoor seating areas for a restaurant and café, improved utilities, updated drainage, drop-off area on 13th Avenue, exterior lighting and new welcome center.


Denver Botanic Gardens Freyer-Newman Center for Science, Art and Education

The Freyer-Newman Center for Science, Art and Education is the culmination of more than a decade of expansion in support of the Gardens’ core values: relevance, diversity, sustainability and transformation. The Center will house a growing collection at the highest standards and provide broader community access. It will house gallery space for one or multiple exhibits complementing outdoor exhibits or providing unique experiences. The Center will enable the transformation of the Boettcher Memorial Center basement into Kid Central – a safe indoor zone with capacity for school programs and camps. It will have an auditorium for public lectures and film series, state-of-the-art labs and new herbaria. It will add 142 parking spaces to improve access and reduce stress on the neighborhood.


Denver Center for the Performing Arts - Bonfils Theatre Complex Upgrades

This project gives the 40-year-old Bonfils Theatre Complex a facelift with new technologies, ADA accessibility, code compliance, energy efficiencies and appropriate 21st century audience needs. Project improvements include code compliance for the Stage Theatre (soon to be the Wolf Theatre); full accessibility for the Stage Theatre and related public areas; ADA path of travel compliance for the Ricketson Theatre (soon to be the Singleton Theatre); public safety, health and convenience for the Stage Theatre and public areas; and operational efficiencies for the Stage Theatre, Ricketson Theatre and public areas.


Denver Museum of Nature & Science - Critical Deferred Maintenance

The Denver Museum of Nature & Science is a popular destination for engagement, education and scientific study with a repository of more than four million collections from around the world. The Museum is an assortment of buildings that have been constructed by connecting one to another since the first structure housing a workshop and heating plant was opened in 1903. The first public building opened in 1908 and remains a public area today. A wing has been built approximately every decade since 1908, growing in total building size from 28,068 square feet to the current square footage of 711,000. This project will provide deferred maintenance on critical items such as HVAC and life safety priorities.


Denver Zoo - Phase One Master Plan Improvements

Founded in 1896, the Denver Zoo is Colorado’s most visited cultural institution with more than 1.8 million guests annually. Denver Zoo is a 24-hour, year-round home to nearly 4,000 animals, including many endangered and threatened species. The campus includes 39 structures, 92 buildings, 80 acres and 648,798 managed square feet. As a 123-year-old institution, the infrastructure is strained with a significant portion functionally obsolete.

Improvements included a state-of-the-art Animal Hospital. The new facility, which replaces the nearly 40-year-old hospital, is designed to treat the Zoo’s 3,000-plus animals as well as provide guests a deep look inside animal care. The 22,000-square-foot facility includes two treatment rooms, critical care units, and a cutting-edge surgical suite.


Improvements to Red Rocks Amphitheatre

Red Rocks Amphitheatre is a world renowned, award-winning, naturally occurring amphitheater located just 15 miles west of Denver. The funding provided by the Elevate Denver Bond for Red Rocks will be focused on the replacement of the current utilitarian stage roof that was constructed in the 1980s. This project will improve aesthetics with a roof that better complements the amphitheater, provides additional shelter for artists and stagehands, increases protection for instruments and improves production capabilities to add more flexibility for lighting, sound and video.


Improvements to Buell Theatre

Updating this aging facility will improve the patron experience and access throughout the lobby from the lower orchestra to the balcony level and create more marketable spaces for revenue-generating opportunities. Improvements include repairs, renovations and modernization of existing systems and equipment throughout the lobby. This project will also renovate existing public restrooms and construct new non-gendered or family restrooms in key areas of the lobby to provide more convenient and equitable access to all patrons. The work is planned to be completed during a period of least impact of the facility, allowing for day-to-day operations to continue as best and as efficient as possible.

Denver Health and Hospital Authority

Denver Health Outpatient Center

Denver Health provides medical care to nearly one-third of Denver’s population. This new facility increases Denver Health’s capacity by 50 percent, meeting the increasing healthcare needs of current and future Denver residents. It also gives much-needed space to the Denver Health campus, allowing the hospital to boost primary care services and expand operating rooms.

Public Safety

Police District 5 Replacement

The Police District 5 Station replacement project will transform a vacant space into a modern police facility to support the growing northeast Denver community including the Montbello, Stapleton and Green Valley Ranch neighborhoods. This project will create a site that can appropriately house the current Station staff, which is currently at 180 percent capacity as a result of the area’s dramatic population growth and the city’s effort to increase patrol staffing. The project will address identified issues and create a public plaza, parking and a community room for public meetings and use by residents. This new station will also be a joint facility with the 911 Combined Communications Center, allowing public safety staff to better serve and respond to the growing community.


Police District 6 Replacement

Denver Police Department (DPD) District 6 Station is one of the most active police stations in Denver. The upgraded DPD District 6 Station will be constructed approximately one mile west of the current station, at 1331 N. Cherokee St. The site is located next to the Police Administration Building and the Denver Crime Laboratory, providing ample opportunities to create a robust public safety campus. The new station will address capacity, accessibility, and efficiency concerns. It will serve as a multi-use facility, offering residents and businesses an accessible community room to gather, and providing public safety officers and staff a collaborative space to improve operations and better serve the city.


Fire Station Restrooms and Kitchen Upgrades

This project will repair and improve 19 fire stations (half of Denver’s 38 fire stations) with updated equipment, bathrooms and living spaces to ensure better functionality, safety and gender equity. It will update equipment, restrooms, kitchens and living spaces to create functionality and comfort for employees and visitors.


Fire Station at 72nd Avenue & Tower Road

The rapidly growing area of northeast Denver is lacking fire and emergency coverage per National Fire Protection Association standards. A fire station is needed specifically along the Tower Road corridor between 60th Avenue and Peña Boulevard. This project will build a new fire station at 72nd Avenue and Tower Road to respond to emergency incidents more quickly and meet the needs of this fast-growing community. The new station will enhance the neighborhood with a welcoming community facility and provide timely emergency services in a safe and professional manner. 


Improvements to Police Department Buildings

Our police department staff works hard every day to keep our city safe. Many of their facilities are outdated and over capacity, needing multiple upgrades to be efficient and secure. 

This project will enhance the City of Denver’s public safety infrastructure by providing much-needed improvements to police department buildings. Improvements will include prioritized safety measures, updated technology, improved infrastructure, renovated/repaired building elements and enhanced efficiency and security.


Denver County Jail Improvements

Originally opened in 1956, the Denver County Jail needs to meet safety and efficiency standards for employees, inmates and visitors. Although renovations have occurred throughout the years, some of the original structural elements exist and have been utilized since the facility opened. 

The project will improve facility safety, enhance customer service, provide updated construction and increase operational efficiency. It will also add life safety systems; improve functionality, security and support for the remodel of the administrative area/receiving unit; and install fire sprinkler systems.

Libraries

Central Library Renovation

The Denver Central Library is the epicenter of all Denver Public Library operations. As the premier public library and research facility in Colorado, it is the branch library for the changing and growing communities of Capitol Hill, Golden Triangle and Downtown Denver and is a tourist attraction and cultural center.  The Denver Central Library renovation project includes significant upgrades to address safety and security issues, correct deferred maintenance, and reconfigure the building for modern library programs, services and resources. Renovations will occur throughout the 540,000-square-foot building to ensure the building remains a safe and accessible library for all.


Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library Renovation

Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library serves the Five Points Denver neighborhood as a cultural and historical center for African Americans in the Rocky Mountain West. Critical building components and architectural features are aging with noticeable wear and tear. This project will renovate landscaping, sidewalks and parking lots; improve heating, ventilation and air conditioning; replace rooftop HVAC units; move book return to interior space; update fire alarm codes, surveillance, access control, electrical, lighting, power and communication systems; update restrooms, conference and community rooms; refresh children’s area; improve staff room efficiency and lighting; explore new arrangements for shelving and computer/mobile device access; provide interior finishes including paint, carpet, tile, ceilings, furniture and fixtures; comply with ADA requirements; provide new signs; and update information technology, data and telecommunications.


Byers Branch Library Renovation

Built in 1918, the Byers Branch Library is a historic Carnegie library. This project will address landscaping, sidewalk and exterior lighting; explore entrance redesign; modernize the elevator; improve heating, ventilation and air conditioning; repair and restore facade; add staff restroom and update public restroom; meet fire alarm codes; install surveillance and access control; update electrical, data, power and communication systems; update lighting; redesign service point for technology and service models; update community room; explore new arrangements for flexible learning spaces, shelving and computer/mobile device access; redesign children’s area and staff spaces; provide interior finishes including paint, carpet, tile, ceilings, furniture and fixtures; provide new signs; comply with ADA requirements; and update IT, data and telecommunications capabilities.


Smiley Branch Library Renovation

Built in 1918, the Smiley Branch Library is a historic Carnegie library. Critical building components and architectural features have exceeded life expectancy.  This project will address landscaping, sidewalk and exterior lighting; explore entrance redesign; modernize the elevator; improve heating, ventilation and air conditioning; repair and restore facade; add staff restroom and update public restroom; meet fire alarm codes; install surveillance and access control; update electrical, data, power and communication systems; update lighting; redesign service point for technology and service models; update community room; explore new arrangements for flexible learning spaces, shelving and computer/mobile device access; redesign children’s area and staff spaces; provide interior finishes including paint, carpet, tile, ceilings, furniture and fixtures; provide new signs; comply with ADA requirements; and update IT, data and telecommunications capabilities.


Athmar Park Branch Library Renovation

The Athmar Park Branch Library was built as a church in 1971 and remodeled in 1993. Critical building components and architectural features have exceeded life expectancy.

This project includes increasing square footage with an addition; addressing landscaping, sidewalk and exterior lighting; exploring redesign of entrances; creating views into community room from entrance; improving heating, ventilation and air conditioning; repairing and restoring existing facade; redesigning and/or relocating existing exterior book drop; adding staff restroom and updating existing restrooms; meeting fire alarm codes; installing surveillance and access control; updating electrical; improving data, power and communication systems; updating ambient lighting; redesigning technology service point; updating community room; exploring new arrangements for flexible learning spaces and computer/mobile device access; redesigning children’s area; exploring existing material shelving arrangement; redesigning staff rooms; providing new interior finishes, furniture and fixtures; providing new signs; complying with ADA requirements; and updating IT, data and telecommunications capabilities.


Eugene Field Branch Library Renovation

Built in 1970, the Eugene Field Branch Library needs updating and has building components and architectural features that have exceeded life expectancy.  This project includes parking, landscaping, sidewalks and exterior lighting; reconfiguring and repaving parking lot; creating exterior storage area; exploring opportunities to relocate exterior book return; redesigning entrance and display area; creating views into community room from entrance; improving heating, ventilation and air conditioning; updating restrooms; meeting fire alarm codes; installing surveillance and access control; updating electrical; improving data, power and communication systems; updating ambient lighting; redesigning technology service point and removing soffit and ceiling above service point; updating community room; installing projector and sound system in community room; exploring new arrangements for flexible learning spaces and computer/mobile device access; refreshing children’s area; exploring material shelving arrangement; redesigning staff workroom, breakroom and office; providing new interior finishes, furniture and fixtures; complying with ADA requirements; providing new signs; and updating IT, data and telecommunications capabilities.


Pauline Robinson Branch Library Renovation

The Pauline Robinson Branch Library was built in 1995 and now has aging critical building components. The building is too small for the population and has inadequate community spaces and staff work areas.

This project includes increasing square footage with an addition; addressing landscaping, sidewalk and exterior lighting; repaving and repairing parking lot; replacing main air handling units; improving heating, ventilation and air conditioning; repairing and restoring facade; redesigning/relocating exterior book drop; adding staff restroom and updating existing restrooms; meeting fire alarm codes; installing surveillance and access control; updating electrical; improving data, power and communication systems; updating ambient lighting; redesigning service point for technology and service models; updating community room; exploring new arrangements for flexible learning spaces; redesigning children’s area; exploring material shelving arrangement; redesigning staff rooms; exploring new arrangements for computer/mobile device access; providing new interior finishes, furniture and fixtures; providing new signs; complying with ADA requirements; and updating IT, data and telecommunications capabilities.


Ross-Barnum Branch Library Renovation

The Ross-Barnum Branch Library was built in 1954 and remodeled in 1973 and 1994. Critical building components and architectural features have exceeded life expectancy.

This project includes making the basement accessible with elevator installation and life safety improvements; addressing landscaping, sidewalk and exterior lighting; exploring redesign of entrances; improving heating, ventilation and air conditioning; repairing and restoring facade; redesigning/relocating exterior book drop; updating restrooms; meeting fire alarm codes; installing surveillance and access control; updating electrical;

improving data, power and communication systems; updating ambient lighting; redesigning service point for technology and service models; updating/relocating community room; exploring new arrangements for flexible learning spaces; redesigning children’s area and staff spaces; exploring material shelving arrangement; exploring new arrangements for computer/mobile device access; providing new interior finishes, furniture and fixtures; providing new signs; complying with ADA requirements; and updating IT, data and telecommunications capabilities.


Ross-Broadway Branch Library Renovation

This project will increase square footage with an addition; address landscaping, sidewalk and exterior lighting; explore entrance redesign; improve heating, ventilation and air conditioning; repair/restore facade and oak window frames; redesign/relocate exterior book drop; meet fire alarm codes; install surveillance and access control; update electrical, data, power and communication systems; update ambient lighting; redesign technology and service model service point; update community room, restrooms and children’s area; explore new arrangements for flexible learning spaces, shelving and computer/mobile device access; redesign staff

space; provide interior finishes including paint, carpet, tile, ceilings, furniture and fixtures; provide new signs; comply with ADA requirements; and update IT, data and telecommunications capabilities.


Ross-University Hills Branch Library Renovation

This project includes addressing landscaping, sidewalk and exterior lighting; repaving parking lot; redesigning entrances; upgrading elevator; improving heating, ventilation and air conditioning; replacing existing boiler; updating restrooms; meeting fire alarm codes; installing surveillance and access control; updating electrical; improving data, power and communication systems; updating ambient lighting; redesigning service point for technology and service models; updating community room; exploring new arrangements for flexible learning spaces; redesigning children’s area separate from staff entrance; exploring material shelving arrangement; redesigning staff rooms; exploring new arrangements for computer/mobile device access; providing new interior finishes, furniture and fixtures; providing new signs; complying with ADA requirements; and updating IT, data and telecommunications capabilities. 


Schlessman Family Branch Library Renovation

Opened in 2002, the Schlessman Family Branch Library is among the most used in the area.  This project includes increasing square footage with an addition; researching and repairing leaking titanium façade panels; replacing the roof; addressing landscaping, sidewalk and exterior lighting; exploring redesign of entrances; improving heating, ventilation and air conditioning; reducing solar gain on east and south curtain wall; updating restrooms; reconditioning and paving parking lot; meeting fire alarm codes; installing surveillance and access control; updating electrical; improving data, power and communication systems; updating ambient lighting; redesigning service point for technology and service models; updating/relocating community room; exploring new arrangements for flexible learning spaces; redesigning children’s area; exploring existing material shelving arrangement; redesigning staff rooms; exploring new arrangements for

computers/mobile device access; providing new interior finishes, furniture and fixtures; providing new signs; complying with ADA requirements; and updating IT, data and telecommunications capabilities.

Parks and Recreation

Westwood Recreation Center

The Westwood neighborhood lacks access to recreation center facilities. This project creates new opportunities for healthy recreation and play in this historically underserved west Denver neighborhood. This project includes obtaining the land for the center prior to project development, design and construction.

The new recreation center may include an indoor gymnasium, fitness areas for weights/cardio activities, natatorium, kid-watch, multipurpose rooms, kitchen, locker rooms, and outdoor areas for recreation activities and community events. The city will ask for public input during the design and public engagement phases of the project to help determine the specific program elements of the recreation center.


Arkins Court Promenade

The Arkins Promenade project will transform the South Platte River front, from 35th to 38th avenues, into part of a mile-long pedestrian corridor from Globeville Landing Park to Arkins Park. Improvements will include walking and bicycle access, gathering and play areas, an elevated walkway, and overlooks with seating. The Promenade will update landscaping with trees, native grass areas, and planters to filter stormwater and improve the water quality in the South Platte River. This project will enhance connectivity between Five Points, Globeville and the Elyria-Swansea neighborhoods, and provide access to two of Denver’s newest parks, Globeville Landing and River North Park. Thanks to the voter-approved Elevate Denver Bond Program, Denver Parks & Recreation is fulfilling its mission to enhance the health of Denver residents and the environment by creating safe, beautiful and sustainable places.


Paco Sanchez Re-Imagine Play

Re-Imagine Play at Paco Sanchez Park is an innovative redesign of traditional play environments. In addition to the revolutionary play environment, this project will create an entertainment space to host outdoor classes, cultural festivals and farmers markets. It will engage visitors in a multi-generational play environment that encourages higher levels of physical activity and social interaction. This project leads to greater health and wellness in areas with some of the highest childhood obesity rates in the city.


Bear Valley Tennis Courts Replacement

Bear Valley is one of the most highly utilized tennis facilities in southwest Denver and is frequently used for league competitions. This project will replace six existing asphalt tennis courts with post-tensioned concrete courts, which have a life span of 40 years or more. The new courts will include improved posts and netting, chain-link fencing, refurbished lighting and/or LED upgrades, and signs.


Congress Park Pool Reconstruction

One of the oldest outdoor pools in the city, the Congress Park Pool has grown increasingly costly to maintain and requires extensive upgrades. Built in 1955, the pool has seen multiple opening delays due to major leaks. This project includes the design and construction of a new, state-of-the-art swimming pool. The design process included various means of gathering community input to ensure the Congress Park Pool remains a special and valued asset for the neighborhood. Local neighborhood organizations, schools and community groups were engaged throughout the design process.


Green Valley Ranch Indoor Pool

The Green Valley Ranch Indoor Pool project will complete the original building expansion vision for this recreation center located in a rapidly growing Denver neighborhood. The facility will include a lap pool, a leisure pool with whirlpool and lazy river features, a tube slide, changing rooms, a party room, and office and maintenance area.


Recreation Center Renovations and Improvements

Denver’s recreation program includes 31 recreation centers ranging from local neighborhood centers to large regional facilities. Many of these buildings are older and have significant deferred maintenance needs. This project will provide critical improvements to 21 recreation centers with roof replacements, HVAC replacements, fire alarm replacements, electrical upgrades, ADA improvements and other important structural repairs. Upgrades and enhancements include, lighting, floor replacement, repainting, weight room upgrades, locker room enhancements, front counter remodels, and upgrades to communications and audiovisual equipment. These measures will save taxpayer dollars, improve energy efficiency and keep recreation centers functional for years to come.


Downtown Park Acquisition & Existing Park Improvements - Skyline Park

Skyline Park will be redesigned to become a vital urban park in the heart of Denver. Already a destination for workers and visitors, it also will serve the needs of a growing downtown residential population. This project will reimagine the park in coordination with the reconstruction of the 16th Street Mall and integration with adjacent streets. The project will improve existing facilities, provide new amenities to foster everyday use and create a more engaging place for year-round activities. Improvements for Phase 1 construction are anticipated to create new opportunities for recreation and respite downtown.


Inspiration Point Playground

Inspiration Point Park provides stunning views of downtown to the east and the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains to the west. Built in 1910, this 25-acre park overlooking Clear Creek Valley is now surrounded by residential neighborhoods and an industrial zone. This project includes the design and construction of a new playground, picnic area with shelter and restoration of the historic masonry wall, one of the park’s signature features. The development of a playground will provide access to play facilities for a neighborhood that currently has very few options within walking distance. This project will create new programmed uses at the park with careful integration with the historic and natural character.


City Park Playground Replacement

This 17,000 square foot playground has shown signs of wear for years and placed excessive burdens on Parks Operations. The safety surfacing was deteriorating, and the decking throughout the structure was warped creating trip hazards. The new playground will provide exciting and inclusive new features built to modern standards, enabling safe and fun activities for years to come. 


Civic Center - Greek Theater Improvements

As a premier civic and cultural center in the Rocky Mountain region, Civic Center Park has defined Denver’s urban landscape. Visited by millions each year, it has been the cornerstone of large events and gatherings for years. Construction began on the Greek Theater in 1917 to create an open stage in front of a sunken orchestra and theater floor with seating for up to 1,200 audience members. The theater is framed by a 210-foot semicircular Colonnade of Civic Benefactors, which has murals by local artist Allen True on its interior walls.

Upon completion in 1919, the Greek Theater began to host a variety of shows including vaudeville performances and musical concerts. This project will design, rehabilitate and construct a premier outdoor performance venue at the Greek Theater. It will enhance visitor experience, facilitate greater and more diverse community celebrations and cultural events, and will ultimately lead to greater economic vitality.


Harvey Park Recreation Center Improvements

Located in southwest Denver, Harvey Park was founded in the 1950s as a family-friendly neighborhood with modern, ranch-style homes. The core of this neighborhood is Harvey Park, Harvey Lake and Harvey Park Recreation Center. The neighborhood continues to increase in popularity as the desire for recreational options and its midcentury homes grow. This project will convert aging tennis courts to much-needed off-street parking to improve access to these neighborhood amenities. 


Mountain Parks Conservation Camp Facility Restoration

Back in 1935, what is now Red Rocks Park at Mt. Morrison was home to a Civilian Conservation Corp. This group of more than 200 men lived on site to build the world-renowned Red Rocks amphitheater. Now, an effort is underway to pay homage to that group by restoring three buildings at the conservation camp, along with two other buildings at Katherine Craig Park.

Full restoration and interior finishes are needed at the buildings to address structural integrity, infrastructure (roofing, HVAC, ADA, etc.), health and safety. The historic integrity of the buildings will be preserved, and the buildings will be protected from further deterioration.


Park Maintenance Facilities Improvements

The Denver Parks and Recreation system spans over a 148-year history, from the first park created in 1868 to nearly 20,000 acres of urban parks and mountain parkland today. This project includes improvements for staff safety and facility functionality; newly constructed facilities; additional work space and remodeled existing facilities for expanded use; additional staff; expanded staff parking, staff restrooms/lockers/breakrooms and storage for equipment, vehicles and materials; and updated electrical, fire alarms and HVAC equipment. 


Sun Valley Riverside Park

The new park will provide recreation, health and wellness opportunities for an underserved population as part of the Sun Valley masterplan. This project will reclaim the riverfront between 9th Avenue and 13th Avenue. This project will develop the base park infrastructure of Phase 1, including grading, irrigation, walking paths, and amenities. Project partners will contribute funding for a synthetic turf field and other possible amenities.


Swansea Recreation Center Indoor Pool

The outdoor pool at Swansea Recreation Center is aging and needs a full replacement. Rather than replace an outdoor pool that can only be used in the summer season, Denver Parks and Recreation will design and build a new indoor pool that will extend recreation possibilities for the community through all seasons. This project will expand the existing Recreation Center to include an indoor pool and support services associated with the expanded programming such as office, dressing rooms, storage and chemical rooms. This new pool will also address a significant aquatic service gap as the nearest recreation center indoor pool is nearly four miles away.


Irrigation Renovation Projects

Throughout Denver's Park system, there are multiple irrigation needs that are critical to address. These systems are aging and in poor condition, contributing to excessive water waste and requiring frequent maintenance. Renovating these outdated and worn irrigation systems will contribute to improved water conservation, customer service, infrastructure preservation, sustainability and recreational opportunities. These projects will begin to design and renovate much-needed irrigation improvements in multiple Denver parks. Project elements include renovated mainlines, valves, laterals and heads, plus upgrades to central control and pump systems as needed.

Public Facilities

Deferred Maintenance Correction (Facilities Condition Assessment Program)

Numerous city-owned buildings require improvements to remain safe and functional for employees and visitors. Elevate Denver will complete more than 15 deferred maintenance projects. 


ADA Projects

To make public buildings more accessible for people with disabilities, Elevate Denver is making improvements in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements. Improvements include reconstructing exterior sidewalks and pavement areas; replacing or adding accessible exterior and interior routes, accessible parking and visual alarms; and modifying courtrooms, restrooms and other areas in buildings.


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