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East Area Plan

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Take a survey online

During the survey, you can read and give feedback on updated recommendations for the East Area Plan. The survey will be available October 29.

Or, join us in person for our next community workshop

The next opportunity to share your thoughts on the future of the neighborhoods in the East Area is coming Tuesday, October 29.

Attendees will have the chance to weigh in on new alternatives for building heights and housing options, and on updates to draft plan recommendations that cover the local economy and housing, mobility, land use urban and design, and quality of life. The updates will reflect input city planners received throughout the summer on the first draft of the plan recommendations, released in May. 

East Area Community Workshop

EastMeeting-Postcard-191029draft

Download the bilingual meeting flier

6-8 p.m., Tuesday, October 29
Johnson & Wales University Academic Center
1900 Olive Street, Denver

Food will be provided, and children are welcome.

Interpretation: Amharic, Burmese, Karen, Somali and Spanish will be available. 

Plan on attending? Use the button below to let us know! RSVPs are not required to attend, but they will help us ensure we can accommodate everyone.

Can't make it? Meeting materials and opportunities to share your voice online will be posted on this page October 29. Join our email list to receive updates.

Location Information and Parking: Signs will be set up around the building pointing to the meeting , but we encourage you to give yourself 5-10 minutes to walk from your car, if you intend to drive. General parking is available at the parking lot on the northwest corner of Quebec Street and 17th Avenue (parking address for Google Maps: 1785 Quebec Street). Accessible parking closest to the building is available in the small parking lot on the northeast corner of Olive Street and East 19th Avenue.. (See location on Google Maps.)   

Accessibility: If you need a sign language interpreter or CART Services, contact SignLanguageServices@denvergov.org at least three business days before the meeting. For other public accommodation requests/concerns related to a disability, please contact DisabilityAccess@denvergov.org.

 

Stay Connected

Join the East Area Plan email list to get updates on the plan and reminders about opportunities to share your voice. 


Frequently Asked Questions

Want quick information about the East Area Plan? Download and share our FAQs to get caught up on the planning process, and share them with your neighbors so they can get involved. 


Contact Us

Elizabeth Weigle
Senior City Planner
elizabeth.weigle@denvergov.org


Steering Committee 

All meetings are open to the public.

Check back for information on future meetings

Name Affiliation
Laurie Bogue Bellevue-Hale Neighborhood Association
Tom Fesing  East Colfax Neighborhood Association
Yoal Ghebrehmeskel
Street Fraternity
Mina Goldstein Park Hill
Marti Holmes Historic Montclair Community Association
Kyaw Lin Oo Hidden Brook/Street Fraternity
Tracey MacDermott Greater Park Hill Community, Inc.
Monica Martinez Fax Partnership
Tom Meyer New Freedom Neighbors 
Hilarie Portell Colfax Mayfair Business Improvement District
Merritt Pullam Mayfair Neighbors, Inc.
Rosalyn Redwine Small business owner
Wende Reoch Cranmer Park/Hilltop Association
Andy Sense Park Hill

Steering Committee Meeting #1
6-8 p.m., Wednesday, July 26, 2017
East Montclair Community Center, 6740 E. Colfax Ave., Denver
Summary (PDF)
Presentation (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #2
6-8 p.m., Wednesday, August 23, 2017
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Summary (PDF)
Presentation (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #3
6-8 p.m., Thursday, September 28, 2017
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Summary (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #4
6-8 p.m., Thursday, October 26, 2017
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Summary (PDF)
Presentation (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #5
6-8 p.m., Thursday, November 16, 2017
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Presentation (PDF)
Summary (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #6
6-8 p.m., Monday, December 11, 2017
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Presentation (PDF)
Summary (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #7
6-8 p.m., Thursday, January 25, 2018
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Presentation (PDF)
Summary (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #8
6-8 p.m., Thursday, February 22, 2018
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Presentation (PDF)
Summary (PDF)

Steering Commitee Meeting #9
6-8 p.m., Thursday, March 22, 2018
Montclair Civic Building (The Molkery)
6829 E. 12th Avenue
Presentation (PDF)
Summary (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #10
6-8 p.m., Thursday, April 26, 2018
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Presentation (PDF)
Summary (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #11
6-8 p.m., Thursday, May 24, 2018
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Presentation (PDF)
Summary (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #12
6-8 p.m., Thursday, June 28, 2018
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Summary (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #13
6-8 p.m., Thursday, July 26, 2018
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Presentation (PDF) 
Summary (PDF) 

Steering Committee Meeting #14
6-8 p.m., Thursday, August 23, 2018
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Presentation (PDF)
Summary (PDF) 

Steering Committee Meeting #15
6-8 p.m., Thursday, September 27, 2018
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Presentation (PDF)
Summary (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #16
6-8 p.m., Thursday, November 29, 2018
Montclair Civic Building (The Molkery)
6829 E. 12th Avenue, Denver
Presentation (PDF)
Summary (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #17
6-8 p.m., Thursday, January 24, 2019
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street
Summary (PDF)
Presentation (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #18
6-8 p.m., Thursday, March 28, 2019
Montclair Civic Building (The Molkery), 6829 E. 12th Avenue
Presentation (PDF)
Summary (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #19
6-8 p.m., Thursday, April 25, 2019
Montclair Civic Center (The Molkery)
6829 E. 12th Avenue, Denver
Presentation (PDF)
Summary (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #20
6-8 p.m., Thursday, May 23, 2019
Montclair Civic Center (The Molkery)
6829 E. 12th Avenue, Denver
Presentation (PDF)
Summary (PDF)

Steering Committee Meeting #21
6-8 p.m., Thursday, June 27
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Layden
Presentation (PDF)

 

Plan Timeline

graphic showing planning process for East Area Plan 

  • Summer 2017 - Summer 2018: Exisiting conditions research and community listening
  • Spring - Fall 2018: Community input analysis, draft vision statements and community priorities
  • Winter 2018 - Spring 2019: Confirm community vision and priorities
  • Spring - Summer 2019: Share and gather community input on draft recommendations to achieve vision and priorities
  • Fall - Winter 2019: Updates to draft recommendations based on community input
  • Winter 2019 - Spring 2020: Draft plan

Download the planning process graphic (PDF)

Learn more about the process for neighborhood planning in Denver

 


Project Archive

Past Meeting Information

Below are listed all the community meetings, workshops, office hours and pop-up events hosted by the planning team. Unlike traditional meetings and workshops, pop-up events are intended to reach hard-to-reach communities where they live and involve only paper materials and on-the-street interviews. 

Street Fraternity pop-op
October 17, 2017

Hidden Brook Apartments pop-up
October 18, 2017

South Park Hill Listening Session
6-8 p.m., Wednesday, January 16, 2019
Park Hill Masonic Lodge, 4819 Montview Boulevard
Presentation (PDF)

Avenue 8 at Mayfair pop-up
January 17, 2019

Shephard’s Motel pop-up
February 14, 2019

Hidden Brook Apartments pop-up
February 14, 2019

Regal Café pop-up
February 16, 2019

Area-Wide Community Workshop #1
6-8 p.m., Wednesday, February 20, 2019
Park Hill Masonic Lodge, 4819 Montview Blvd
Meeting materials available at online workshop

Neighborhood Workshop #1 – Hale
6-8 p.m., Thursday, February 21, 2019
Friendship Baptist Church, 880 Fairfax Street
Meeting materials available at online workshop

Neighborhood Workshop #2 – South Park Hill
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, February 26, 2019
Park Hill Masonic Lodge, 4819 Montview Blvd
Meeting materials available at online workshop

Neighborhood Workshop #3 – Montclair
6-8 p.m., Thursday, February 28, 2019
Friendship Baptist Church, 880 Fairfax Street
Meeting materials available at online workshop

Xenia Village Apartments pop-up
March 5, 2019

Neighborhood Workshop #4 – East Colfax
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Ashley Elementary School, 1914 Syracuse Street
Meeting materials available at online workshop

Street Fraternity pop-up
March 27, 2019

Hidden Brook Apartments pop-up
April 3, 2019

East Area Community Workshop
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, May 14, 2019
9th & Colorado Development Office
1000 Colorado Boulevard, Denver
Presentation (PDF) 

Drop-in Office Hours 
6-8 p.m., Thursday, July 25
Art Gym Denver
1460 Leyden Street, Denver

Drop-in Office Hours 
5-8 p.m., August 1, 2019
Friendship Baptist Church
880 Fairfax Street, Denver

Drop-in Office Hours
5-8 p.m., August 6, 2019
East Montclair Community Center
6740 E. Colfax Ave., Denver

Listed below are focus groups hosted by the plan team for the purpose of topic-specific discussions with local stakeholders with subject-matter expertise and experience. 

Focus Group #1: Affordable housing, social services, & financial stability 
January 8, 2019
Carla Madison Recreation Center 

Focus Group #2: Small business retention, real estate/transit oriented development, & healthy food
January 9, 2019
Carla Madison Recreation Center 
Meeting notes (PDF)

Focus Group #3: Mobility & access
January 15, 2019
Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden Street

Focus Group #4: Green infrastructure, recreation, open space
January 17, 2019
Carla Madison Recreation Center

Focus Group #5: Design quality & character preservation
January 29, 2019
Carla Madison Recreation Center
Meeting notes (PDF)

Focus Group #6: Small business retention, real estate/transit oriented development, & healthy food 
6-8 p.m., April 2, 2019
Carla Madison Recreation Center
Presentation (PDF)

Focus Group #7: Green Infrastructure 
6-8 p.m., April 4, 2019 
Carla Madison Recreation Center
Presentation (PDF)

Focus Group #8: Mobility 
6-8 p.m., April 17, 2019 
Carla Madison Recreation Center
Presentation (PDF)

Focus Group #9: Design Quality and Character Preservation 
6-8 p.m., April 18, 2019 
Carla Madison Recreation Center
Presentation (PDF)

Focus Group #10: Affordable housing, social services, & financial stability 
6-8 p.m., April 23, 2019 
Carla Madison Recreation Center
Presentation (PDF)

Listed below are (1) meetings hosted by East Area neighborhood groups and organizations, or other City of Denver departments or teams that East Area Plan team members attended, (2) community events at which the plan had a booth/table or was part of a larger booth or table representing the City of Denver, and (3) stakeholder conversations convened or hosted by East Area organizations. 

8/26/2017 - Mayor's Cabinet in the Community

8/26/2017 - Mayfair Concert in the Park

8/30/2017 -  Upper Montclair Basin community meeting

9/6/2017 - Colfax Mayfair BID board meeting

9/10/2017 - Park Hill Home Tour and Street Fair

9/15/2017 – Seniors In September Educational & Resource Fair at Denver Botanic Gardens

9/21/2017 -  Blueprint Denver Workshop

9/27/2017 - Quebec Alternatives Open House

10/3/2017 - Mayfair Neighbors, Inc. general meeting 

10/12/2017 - Councilwoman Susman Town Hall 

10/17/2017 - East Colfax Neighborhood Association meeting

10/18/2017 - Historic Montclair Community Association, Inc. meeting

10/24/2017 - Fax Partnership board meeting  

11/2/2017 - Greater Park Hill Community, Inc. meeting

11/8/2017 - Upper Montclair Basin community meeting

11/28/2017 - Bellevue Hale annual membership meeting

12/4/2017 - WTF is BRT?

12/6/2017 - Upper Montclair community meeting

3/15/2018 - Blueprint Denver workshop

3/20/2018 - Colfax Grit & Glory, Historic Denver

4/19/2018 - Councilwoman Susman Town Hall

5/10/2018 - DURA, East Colfax Corridor URA Info meeting

9/6/2018 - Greater Park Hill Community, Inc. meeting 

10/17/2018 - Historic Montclair Community Association, Inc. meeting

2/3/2019 – Immigrant/refugee service providers meeting

3/3/2019 – Small business owners meeting

3/19/2019 – Hospitals meeting

4/10/2019 – Development focus group

4/17/2019 – Social service providers meeting

4/17/2019 - Colfax Mayfair BID board meeting

4/27/2019 - Mayor's Cabinet in the Community

5/10/2019 - East Area Businesses Forum 

5/15/2019 - Colfax Mayfair BID board meeting

5/22/2019 – Small business owners meeting

5/28/2019 - Fax Partnership board meeting

5/30/2019 - East Colfax Neighborhood Association meeting

6/3/2019 - Mayfair Neighbors, Inc. general meeting

6/5/2019 - East Side RNO meeting

6/5/2019 - Fax Partnership Open House

6/11/2019 - Greater Park Hill Community, Inc. meeting

6/19/2019 - Historic Montclair Community Association, Inc. meeting

6/19/2019 – Immigrant/refugee service providers and East Colfax Neighborhood Association meeting

7/16/2019 – Meeting with Locust Street neighbors

9/30/2019 - East Area Business Forum 

10/1/2019 – Mayfair Neighbors, Inc. general meeting



Past draft recommendations

Plan recommendations are a like an outline that serves as the basis for the draft plan, when the draft is written. The first set of draft recommendations were shared with the public in May. We received almost 2,000 comments on the recommendations and are updating the recommendations accordingly. Maps associated with the recommendations are currently being updated.

A - HOSPITALS

The healthcare and wellness sector is the foundation for economic growth

  • 60% of all jobs in the East Area (nearly 7,000 jobs total); employs 11% of East working residents
  • Sector is expected to continue to grow – forecast to provide 29% of new jobs through 2040, the largest growth sector in the East Area
  • Includes Rose Medical Center, National Jewish Health, and a growing influence from the Anschutz Campus in Aurora

B - HOSPITALS & SURROUNDING NEIGHBORHOODS

Together, hospitals and surrounding neighborhoods can address community development in ways that are mutually beneficial

The Plan aims to:

  • Help the hospitals stay in the area and evolve in a neighborhood-friendly way
  • Partner with hospitals and nonprofit housing developers to create affordable, workforce housing
  • Partner with hospitals and DPS to address workforce training needs
  • Create more retail and services that benefit hospital employees, visitors, and residents
  • Ensure strong connections from hospitals to transit, parks, and daily services

C - MIXED-USE CENTERS, CORRIDORS & DISTRICTS

The primary location for housing and employment growth in the East Area

The Plan aims to:

  • Create new affordable housing near transit and amenities
  • Preserve and enhance community-serving, locally-owned businesses
  • Promote spaces that strengthen the Area’s small professional office niche

D - MOTELS

There are 17 motels along Colfax that currently serve as a form of transitional housing

The Plan aims to:

  • Encourage the repurposing or redevelopment of motels into permanent and supportive housing

NEIGHBORHOODS OVERALL

A large majority of the East Area’s land is residential

The Plan aims to:

  • Preserve housing affordability
  • Stabilize residents at risk of displacement
  • Expand diversity of housing types by encouraging “missing middle” units such as ADUs (accessory dwelling units) and duplexes

1. BOLSTER THE HEALTHCARE AND WELLNESS SECTOR AS THE FOUNDATION FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH ECONOMY

  • Partner with hospitals, DPS, and nonprofit housing developers to address workforce housing and training needs
  • Ensure strong connections from hospitals to neighborhood amenities such as parks and transit
  • Mix more medical offices and clinics in mixed-use areas throughout the East Area

2. STRENGTHEN THE SMALL PROFESSIONAL OFFICE NICHE WRITE IN ANSWERS BELOW. IF NEIGHBORHOOD-SPECIFIC, LIST WHICH NEIGHBORHOOD.

  • Encourage more co-working spaces and gathering spaces for entrepreneurs
  • Inventory existing buildings for underused spaces appropriate for small businesses
  • Consider creative office uses to activate ground floors in appropriate locations along Colfax

3. PRESERVE AND ENHANCE COMMUNITY-SERVING, LOCALLY-OWNED BUSINESSES

  • Ease regulations that make it difficult to open a business
  • Work with area partners to provide technical assistance such as marketing, lease negotiations, or English-as-a-second-language (ESL) help
  • Expand the Business Impact Opportunity program for small businesses impacted by BRT construction along Colfax

4. PRESERVE HOUSING AFFORDABILITY AND STABILIZE RESIDENTS AT RISK OF DISPLACEMENT

  • Extend covenants for income-restricted properties
  • Better market the City’s existing programs, including temporary rental and utility assistance, property tax rebates, homeowner preservation initiatives, ownership programs, and eviction legal defense fund

5. CREATE NEW AFFORDABLE HOUSING NEAR TRANSIT AND AMENITIES

  • Support acquisition of land by the City and/or its partners, such as DHA and land trust entities, for future development of affordable housing, particularly in corridors, centers and low-medium and high-medium residential areas
  • Allow higher density along Colfax in exchange for affordable units or community-benefiting space

6. EXPAND DIVERSITY OF HOUSING TYPES & AFFORDABILITY IN ALL NEIGHBORHOODS

  • Encourage development of ADUs in all residential areas, in forms that address neighborhood context
  • Encourage more “missing middle” types such as du/tri/fourplexes and townhouses, that are compatible and at affordable price points
  • Ensure new development is family-friendly and expand housing options for non-traditional households, including seniors and group living

7. INCREASE ACCESS TO SUPPORTIVE HOUSING AND SOCIAL SERVICES FOR VULNERABLE RESIDENTS

  • Encourage the repurposing or redevelopment of motels along Colfax into permanent, supportive, or transitional housing
  • Develop more permanent, supportive housing that wraps in services such as health care, child care, and workforce

INCENTIVIZE MAINTAINING EXISTING HOMES AND INTRODUCE NEW MISSING MIDDLE HOUSING IN AREAS VULNERABLE TO DISPLACEMENT

  • Allow additional residential units to occur on a single unit lot together with tools to preserve affordability.
  • Encourage new building forms at affordable price points, such as: Cottage Courts, Tandem House, Duplex/Triplex/Quadplex in “Large House” form

ALLOW ACCESSORY DWELLING UNITS IN ALL RESIDENTIAL AREAS.

  • Consider specific rules for neighborhoods that consider:
  • Unique considerations in different neighborhoods, such as building coverage in flood-prone areas
  • Encourage use for long-term housing rather than short-term rentals
  • Goals for affordability and wealth-building
  • Neighborhood-appropriate parking rules

TRANSFORMATIVE STREETS
Prioritize Walking, Biking, Rolling and Transit Along Key Corridors That Connect People And Places

Colorado Boulevard between 6th and 23rd

  • Improve transit speed and reliability & add amenities at stops.
  • Create a high quality pedestrian space with new and improved crossings for pedestrians and bicycles.
  • In the long-term, provide high capacity transit service.

Monaco Parkway Between 6th and 23rd

  • Create a high quality pedestrian space with improved crossings for pedestrians and bicycles.
  • Install a protected bike lane.
  • Pilot closing access across the parkway to automobile through-traffic.
  • Create more usable public space within the parkway (i.e. multi-use trail, seating, etc.).

Quebec Street Between 6th and 23rd

  • Implement pedestrian and transit improvements as planned in the Quebec Street Multimodal Improvement Project (from 26th to 13th).
  • Create a high quality pedestrian space with improved crossings for pedestrians and bicycles.
  • Provide transit speed and reliability improvements at key locations and stop amenities.

23rd Avenue Between Colorado and Quebec

  • Improve transit speed and reliability & add amenities at stops.
  • Create a high quality pedestrian space with improved crossings for pedestrians and bicycles.
  • Extend conventional bike lane east to Central Park.

Montview Boulevard Between Colorado and Yosemite

  • Create a high quality pedestrian space with new and improved crossings for pedestrians and bicycles.

17th Avenue Between Colorado and Monaco

  • Create a high quality pedestrian space with new and improved crossings for pedestrians and bicycles.
  • Install a protected bike lane.
  • Pilot closing access across the parkway to automobile through-traffic.
  • Create more usable public space within the parkway (i.e. multi-use trail, seating, etc.).

Colfax Avenue Between Colorado and Yosemite

  • Create a high quality pedestrian space with improved crossings for pedestrians and bicycles.
  • Improve transit speed and reliability by implementing the plan for a center running bus rapid transit (BRT) & add amenities at stops.

14th Avenue Between Colorado and Yosemite

  • Create a high quality pedestrian space with new and improved crossings for pedestrians and bicycles.
  • Install a protected bike lane.
  • Study the feasibility of two-way conversion.

13th Avenue Between Colorado and Yosemite

  • Create a high quality pedestrian space with new and improved crossings for pedestrians and bicycles.
  • Study the feasibility of two-way conversion.

6th Avenue Between Colorado and Quebec

  • Provide transit speed and reliability improvements at key locations and stop amenities.
  • Create a high quality pedestrian space with improved crossings for pedestrians and bicycles.
  • Install a protected bike lane.
  • Pilot closing access across the parkway to automobile through-traffic.
  • Create more usable public space within the parkway (i.e. multi-use trail, seating, etc.).

MAP-BASED RECOMMENDATIONS: BICYCLISTS AND PEDESTRIANS

HIGH COMFORT BIKEWAYS
Adopt And Upgrade Planned Denver Moves: Bikes Bikeways & Install High Comfort Bikeways Not Previously Recommended - Also See Transformative Streets. Key Locations Include:

Holly Street Between 17th and Cherry Creek Trail: Extend the existing conventional bike lane on Holly Street between 17th and the Cherry Creek Trail

Monaco Parkway Between 6th and 23rd: Install a protected bike lane on Monaco Parkway between 6th and 23rd

23rd Avenue Between Kearny and Central Park: Extend the bike lane on 23rd Avenue between Kearny and Central Park

17th Avenue Between Colorado and Monaco: Install a protected bike lane on 17th Avenue between Colorado and Monaco and a conventional bike lane on 17th Avenue between Monaco and Yosemite

14th Avenue Between Colorado and Yosemite: Install a protected bike lane on 14th between Colorado and Yosemite

12th Avenue Between Colorado and Yosemite: Install a high comfort bikeway on 12th Avenue between Colorado and Yosemite

6th Avenue Between Colorado and Quebec: Install a protected bike lane on 6th Avenue between Colorado and Uintah

NEW AND WIDENED SIDEWALKS
Create A Complete Sidewalk Network, Enabling Pedestrians To Safely Access Their Destinations

MOBILITY HUBS
Seamlessly Integrate Various Transportation Modes And Provide Customer Amenities at High Ridership Transit Stops - Also See Transfomative Streets

  • Colorado Boulevard at 8th, 11th, and Colfax
  • Colfax Avenue at Krameria and Yosemite
  • 9th Avenue at Clermont

PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE INTERSECTION SAFETY
Study Intersection Safety Improvements - Also See Transformative Streets

  • Quebec Street at Montview and Colfax
  • Colorado Boulevard at 8th, 12th,13th, 14th, 17th and Colfax
  • Colfax Avenue at Monaco and Krameria
  • 14th Avenue at Yosemite

NEIGHBORHOOD TRAFFIC CALMING
Slow Traffic Via A Zone-Based Approach Along Neighborhood Streets

Parks

  • Denison Park
  • Verbena Park
  • Westerly Creek
  • McNichols (William H) Park
  • Mayfair Park
  • Lindsley (Henrey S) Park
  • New Freedom Park
  • Montclair Park
  • Kittredge Park

Primary and Secondary Schools

  • Ashley Elementary School
  • Odyssey School
  • Denver School of the Arts
  • Park Hill Elementary School
  • Palmer Elementary School
  • Montclair Elementary School

Hospitals and Libraries

  • Park Hill Library
  • Rose Medical Center and Veterans Administration Hospital

STRATEGIES AND POLICIES

TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT (TDM)

Provide options for more effective use of the transportation system

  • Formally allow use of alleys for business loading and unloading
  • Allow/encourage BIDs to join a regional TMA to access their resources and/or serve as a TDM district to administer, promote, and implement programs
  • One-time transit incentives to ticket holders to local entertainment and cultural destinations
  • New development strategies including max parking ratios, shared car service and allocated parking, private bike share program, secure bike parking, car/bike share memberships for tenants, transit passes for tenants, Uber/Lyft drop-off parking or pull-out, deliveries scheduled during non-rush hours, better building access for people walking, rolling, or biking to/from buildings
  • Free and reduced RTD fare promotions for residents and employees

PARKING, CURBSIDE MANAGEMENT AND FREIGHT ACCESS

Implement strategies for efficient and equitable use of curbside space

  • Identify flex zone/curb use priorities by function and surrounding land use (i.e. Land use: residential, commercial, mixed use and industrial; Function: mobility, access for people, access for commerce, activation, greening, storage)
  • Pilot converting on-street parking spaces in key locations into high productivity uses such as public parklets, cafe seating, bicycle and micromobility parking, shared parking, mobility hub/transit stop infrastructure
  • Pilot converting alleys into public open space with green stormwater infrastructure
  • Pilot converting on-street parking into freight loading zones at varying times of the day
  • Conduct a comprehensive freight access review
  • Explore a dynamic parking pilot program (performance-based pricing)
  • On-street parking meters:
    • Explore additional opportunities to add parking meters
    • Explore opportunities for adjusting/extending meter times due to adjacent land uses
    • Upgrade technology for ease of use
    • Explore increasing rates
  • Encourage shared parking arrangements
  • Develop additional Area Management Plans (AMP) for neighborhood parking challenges

CENTERS, CORRIDORS AND DISTRICTS

These serve as community destinations and job centers, providing a mix of uses. The majority of jobs and housing growth is targeted for centers, corridors and districts.

Community Centers
Community Centers provide a balance of residential, employment and dining/shopping uses. Buildings provide a high degree of ground floor activation and front onto either streets or shared public space. Buildings are the largest scale of all places. In General Urban context (9th & Colorado and Colorado & Colfax), buildings may be up to 12 stories whereas in Urban Edge context (Mayfair Town Center) they are generally up to 5 stories, although additional heights may be offered in exchange for affordable housing or shared open space.

  • 9th & Colorado
  • Colorado & Colfax
  • Mayfair Town Center

Community Corridors
Community Corridors also provide a balance of residential, employment and dining/shopping uses. Buildings have a distinctly linear orientation fronting the primary street (Colfax and Colorado Blvd.) Building heights vary along the street to provide interest, generally ranging from 3-5 stories with some areas reaching up to 8 stories with community benefits such as affordable housing, community-serving uses or shared open space. The most activity and shared public space occurs directly adjacent to transit stops.

  • Colfax Ave.
  • Colorado Blvd. (parts)

Campus Districts
Campus Districts include education and medical campuses. They are typically dominated by a single, larger institutional use and provide important jobs to the surrounding community. Supporting retail and residential uses may occur within them. Buildings vary greatly in size and scale, depending on the use. The heights shown in the plan suggest appropriate heights given the surrounding context.

  • Johnson and Wales University
  • Rose Medical Center

Local Corridors/Local Centers
Local Centers and Corridors provide options for dining, entertainment and shopping. They may also include some residential and office uses or small, shared open space. These places are generally up to 3 stories. They are quieter places, nestled within residential neighborhoods. The scale is intimate with a focus on the pedestrian. The public realm is typically defined by buildings with active frontages.

  • Neighborhood nodes

RESIDENTIAL AREAS
Areas where the predominant use is residential. Although they are primarily residential, these areas are supported by a variety of embedded uses needed for a complete neighborhood including schools, libraries, recreation and nodes of commercial/retail uses.

High Residential provides the highest intensity of residential uses. These are generally mid to high-rise apartment buildings of up to 12 stories. They may or may not include retail uses, but design treatment and activation of the ground floor along major corridors is important.

High-Medium Residential is predominantly multi-unit residential structures of 3 to 5 stories with a variety of lower-scale residential types. They may be mixed with lower-scale residential buildings as well. Retail uses may be present on street corners close to centers and corridors.

Low-Medium Residential (Multi-Unit) includes 2-3 story apartment buildings. These often include small courtyard buildings or “walk-up” apartments (accessed via stairs instead of elevators) and are usually surface parked. They may be mixed in with single and two unit houses as well. They provide a transition from single and two unit areas to centers and corridors of higher intensity. They are often located near transit.

Low-Medium Residential (Row House) includes single unit attached townhomes and rowhomes. They are 2-3 stories and designed to seamlessly fit in with single and two-unit homes. They usually include a private or shared garage for parking cars. They provide a transition from centers and corridors to single and two unit places.

Low Residential - Two Unit Residential includes two individual homes - either attached in a duplex form or detached in a tandem house form - on a single lot. They often look and feel like a single unit home. Some forms have two entrances that face the street and some have one prominent entrance and one more discreet entrance from a side street or alley. They are site-parked via an enclosed garage or carport.

Low Residential - Single Unit Residential includes more traditional houses that are setback from the street with front and rear yards and occasionally side yards. They usually include a prominent front entrance with a porch or stoop. They often have pitched roofs although some low-sloping roofs exist as well. They are site parked via a garage (usually detached and accessed by an alley) or carport.

Low Residential - Accessory Dwelling Units are smaller units that share a lot with another primary unit. They may be attached and located within the primary structure or detached in a secondary structure located in the rear yard. These units provide sensitive ways to integrate affordable living into more expensive neighborhoods. They allow empty nesters to age in place by moving into a smaller unit and renting their home, or they accommodate singles or couples that want to live in the neighborhood but cannot afford a larger home.


ENCOURAGE A NODAL ENVIRONMENT AND DIRECT GROWTH TO THE AREAS THAT SUPPORT TRANSIT RIDERSHIP AND COMMERCIAL ACTIVITY

  • Provide additional height (above what current zoning allows) in specific areas adjacent to transit
  • Affordable housing Publicly accessible open space Saving an existing building Community-serving businesses

INCENTIVIZE COMMUNITY BENEFITS IN EXCHANGE FOR MORE HEIGHT (ABOVE WHAT CURRENT ZONING ALLOWS).

Benefits include:

  • Affordable housing
  • Community-serving businesses 
  • Publicly accessible open space
  • The preservation of existing buildings

NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER AND URBAN DESIGN

ENCOURAGE RENOVATIONS OR ADDITIONS OVER DEMOLITION THROUGH TOOLS SUCH AS:

  • Clarifying definition of “voluntary demolition” so that retaining an existing building means saving the majority of a structure.
  • Requiring deconstruction and recycling of materials on homes that are a certain age.
  • Providing flexibility in code requirements and administrative relief such as:
    • Allow roof elements such as dormers to penetrate bulk plane
    • Offer flexibility in building coverage and separation requirements
    • Create a “reverse” bulk plane to allow more height in rear instead of front
    • Offer expedited permit processing or other administrative or financial relief

WORK WITH NEIGHBORHOODS TO MODIFY ZONING STANDARDS FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION TO MORE CLOSELY SUPPORT NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER.

Recommendations include modifying:

  • Building coverage
  • Side setbacks
  • Length of two-story side walls
  • Bulk plane + way height is measured

ENCOURAGE MAINTAINING VALUED HOUSING STOCK THAT CONTRIBUTES TO NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER BY ALLOWING ADDITIONAL UNITS IN LOCATIONS NEAR TRANSIT THROUGH TOOLS SUCH AS:

  • Clarifying definition of “voluntary demolition” so that retaining an existing building means saving the majority of a structure.
  • Requiring deconstruction and recycling of materials on homes that are a certain age.
  • Creating a “Character Home + Density Bonus” Program for locations around transit that adjusts regulations to encourage retaining existing houses, or the majority of their structure, by:
    • Permitting up to two units in SU districts (in addition to ADU)
    • Permitting up to three units in TU districts (in addition to ADU)

REQUIRE DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR DEVELOPMENT IN CORRIDORS AND CENTERS

  • Provide design guidance and flexibility for some code requirements in order to get better results in the following:
    • Transitions 
    • High quality designs and materials
    • Creative design solutions
  • Provide design guidance and flexibility for “Nodes of Primary Activation” in key locations adjacent to transit stations and neighborhood commercial nodes that address the following:
    • Maximum ground floor activation 
    • Prohibit upper floor parking facing primary streets 
    • More small, shared open spaces
    • Enhanced streetscape amenities 
    • Preservation of local businesses

COLFAX AVENUE

REMOVE REGULATORY BARRIERS AND OPEN UP FINANCIAL INCENTIVES TO MAKE IT EASIER TO REUSE EXISTING BUILDINGS THAT CONTRIBUTE TO THE CHARACTER OF COLFAX .

  • Establish an Adaptive Reuse Ordinance that eliminates barriers to reusing structures
  • Offer financial assistance for renovating existing buildings.

MODIFY REGULATORY BARRIERS TO REDEVELOPMENT WHILE ALSO INCENTIVIZING COMMUNITY BENEFITS AND CHARACTER PRESERVATION TOOLS TO RESPECT THE UNIQUE HISTORY AND CHARACTER OF COLFAX.

  • Leverage increased development potential (e.g., increased height or intensity allowed through rezoning) to acheive community benefits, including:
    • Affordable housing
    • Publicly accessible open space
    • Saving an existing building
    • Community-serving businesses
  • Reduce off-street parking requirements and offer flexibility in public improvement requirements to reduce barriers to development

OTHER COLFAX-SPECIFIC RECOMMENDATIONS:

  • Make redevelopment process easier with technical assistance and handbook with common questions and considerations.
  • Modify standards to encourage flashing neon, artistic signs, blade signs, and more.

CONNECT EXISTING OPEN SPACE, PARKS AND RECREATIONAL ASSETS THROUGH A HISTORIC PARKWAY PEDESTRIAN NETWORK

  • Incorporate formal pedestrian improvements along the existing Historic Parkways to create a dedicated pedestrian network throughout the area.
  • Update the Design Guidelines for Denver’s Historic Parkways and Boulevards as needed, pending study of pedestrian mobility options.

DEVELOP NEW CONTEMPORARY PARKWAYS THAT CONNECT THE COMMUNITY TO OPEN SPACE, PARKS AND RECREATIONAL ASSETS, AS WELL AS SERVE MULTIPLE COMMUNITY FUNCTIONS

  • Expand the parkway system to complement the Historic Parkways with the addition of new distinct Contemporary Parkways geared toward increased mobility options and park-like conditions
  • Contemporary Parkways should de-emphasize vehicular speed and through-put and reassign portions of the public right-of-way to the function of bike, pedestrian or transit mobility, diverse green infrastructure including tree canopy, native vegetation, and stormwater management while also including high-efficiency lighting

ENHANCE EXISTING COMMUNITY OPEN SPACE, PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITIES

  • Strengthen partnerships with schools, institutions (hospitals), and private property owners to create shared open spaces
  • Increase leisure opportunities within our passive linear park space
  • Encourage higher utilization of existing open space and parks by increasing active programming and improving amenities and maintenance of facilities.

CREATE NEW COMMUNITY OPEN SPACE, PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITIES

  • Create additional community park, recreation and cultural spaces. Prioritize future locations that align with the City’s Game Plan for a Healthy City and urban flooding areas. Some potential future locations include:
    • Mayfair Town Center
    • Area of South Park Hill close to Colfax Avenue
    • East Colfax Neighborhood along Colfax Avenue or at the Post Office Site near Verbena Park
  • Incentivize and/or require mid and large-scale development, especially near BRT stations and within height incentive areas, to include publicly accessible outdoor spaces. Establish standards and guidelines that ensure public accessibility, design, and features that respond to the local community context

SUSTAINABILITY

A. STRENGTHEN THE EXISTING TREE CANOPY AND INCREASE CANOPY COVERAGE WITHIN THE PUBLIC RIGHT-OF-WAY

  • Coordinate with the City and County of Denver Forestry Department to support the City’s removal and replacement of existing trees within the public right-of-way to ensure a healthy and sustainable tree canopy and unique community asset.
  • Increase coverage of the tree canopy through a City-sponsored community replacement program utilizing Denverappropriate trees in communities with less than 20% tree canopy coverage
  • Prioritize preservation of tree canopy in right-of-way design and other CCD Public Works projects.
  • Develop educational programming and partnerships within the community to increase understanding around maintenance and care of the tree canopy
  • Support the development of an Urban Forest Plan to meet city-wide canopy goals for preservation, maintenance, implementation and funding.

B. PROTECT AND PRESERVE EXISTING TREE ASSETS IN ALL REDEVELOPMENT EFFORTS

  • Strengthen development standards to protect existing tree assets and increase requirements to mitigate tree loss in redevelopment or new plans.

C. INCREASE PERVIOUS SURFACE COVERAGE THROUGH THE DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE SYSTEMS

>> Download green streets map (PDF)

  • Explore opportunities to convert existing impervious surface within public right-of-way to pervious acreage through the addition of street trees, tree lawn or bulbouts, trails, parkland or native vegetation
  • Seek opportunities to coordinate with the design of future Contemporary Parkways
  • Seek opportunities to integrate with BRT design along Colfax Ave. and redesign of public right-of way streetscape and remnant parcels to improve infiltration and reduce runoff
  • Develop design standards or guidelines for a contemporary tree lawn
  • Remove and replace impervious areas between the sidewalk and street with 4”-6” depressed lawn or streetscape that improves infiltration and reduces runoff
  • Coordinate implementation through supporting Public Works roadway, stormwater and sanitary projects within the right-of-way
  • Increase the requirements for pervious acreage, water conservation in landscaping and inclusion of natural vegetation for redevelopment and new development
  • Work with private property owners, Colfax corridor Business Improvement Districts and other neighborhood organizations to transition underutilized paved lots to pervious surfaces

D. ENCOURAGE SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT PRACTICES INCLUDING STORMWATER MANAGEMENT, FLOOD PROTECTION, WATER QUALITY, AND WATER USE

  • Implement a system of green streets and green alleys to increase the water quality treatment of stormwater prioritizing streets based on the City’s Green
  • Infrastructure Implementation Strategy methodology and their connection to high mobility corridors such as Colfax Avenue and key neighborhood destinations like parks, churches, schools, institutions and center.
  • Encourage the use of Denver appropriate vegetation that is drought-tolerant and uses a minimal amount of water within the right-of-way
  • Restore the health of the waterways like Westerly Creek by increasing the treatment of stormwater upstream and improving street cleaning in contributing streets

FOOD ACCESS

Download healthy food access map (PDF)

RECRUIT A GROCERY STORE IN THE EAST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD

  • Leverage existing programs like the Colorado Fresh Food Financing Fund and City funds to attract a retailer.
  • Consider alternative, community-driven models such as cooperatives, or co-location with another food or community-related enterprise.

IMPROVE PHYSICAL CONNECTIONS TO FOOD STORES

  • Prioritize sidewalk & crosswalk upgrades within the vicinity of grocery stores and smaller food markets including Healthy Corner Store Initiative participating retailers.

SUPPORT SMALL GROCERS & CORNER STORES

  • Provide subsidies or other assistance for businesses experiencing onerous commercial rents.
  • Help launch and/or fund community-supported distribution projects to remove “minimum order” inventory barriers.

EXPAND ACCESS TO HEALTHY PREPARED MEALS

  • Provide incentives for restaurants/ retailers to offer healthy meals.
  • Develop/fund community-supported restaurants

SUPPORT INITIATIVES THAT ADDRESS FOOD INSECURITY

  • Pursue partnerships with hospitals to deploy healthy food, resources, education, and growing space.
  • Enhance capacity & efficiency of food banks & food rescue networks.
  • Encourage business and institutions to decrease food waste while increasing donation and re-purposing of food.

INCORPORATE FOOD ACCESS INTO HOUSING

  • Support on-site programming such as bulk food delivery, emergency food assistance, nutrition/cooking education, and community gardens.

SUPPORT MORE WIDESPREAD FOOD GROWING/PRODUCTION

  • including backyard gardens, community farms at schools, and commercial greenhouses or other facilities.

SUPPORT THE DEVELOPMENT OF A FARMERS MARKET

 

Past Survey Results

East Area Kickoff Survey: From the summer of 2017 to the spring of 2018, the East Area planning team attended neighborhood meetings throughout the plan area and used an online survey to gather input from more than 1,100 people to learn more about their hopes and concerns on the East Area neighborhoods. The results, summarized below, were used to identify key topics to be addressed in the neighborhood plan. 

Question: What do you like most about the East Area?

Responses: 1,164

Top six most  frequent responses:

  • 366 mentions - local businesses
  • 295 - architecture/architecture
  • 283 - convenient location
  • 223 - diverse local population
  • 176 - local parks and green spaces
  • 172 - the people/community feel

Graphic showing survey results on what residents like most about the East Area.

Question: "What are your biggest concerns about the East Area, now and in the future?

Responses: 1,021

Top six most frequent responses"

  • 493 mentions - crime/safety
  • 285 - traffic, speeding, and congestion
  • 219 - walkability and sidewalks
  • 203 - general clean-up and beautifications 
  • 194 - development and loss of character
  • 149 - chain retail, fast food, liquor stores, etc. 

Graphic illustrating community concerns about the East Area.

Question: What is your big idea to improve the East Area?

Top 6 most frequent responses:

  • Make it safer for pedestrians - 209 mentions
  • Clean up and beautify Colfax - 191
  • More local retail and restaurants - 173
  • Rehab the Colfax hotels - 116
  • Reduce crime/more police presence - 87
  • Improve bikeability - 82

Total respondents: 759

The predominant themes of the community’s big ideas were safety and revitalization along Colfax. Improved walkability was a popular topic, particularly through easier street crossings, traffic calming, better lighting and improved sidewalks. Similarly, many respondents suggested beautifying and activating Colfax by adding trees and streetscaping; helping to foster growth in new local and independent retail and restaurants; cleaning up trash; reducing crime and potentially transitioning the street’s motels into higher-quality affordable housing, artists’ live-work studios, or other non-traditional group living spaces.

Graphic showing survey results on big ideas for East Area.

Question: "Please tell us what neighborhood amenities are important to you. These can be amenities that exist today or ones you would like to see in the future. The top amenities for me in the East Area are…"

Responses:

  • Grocery shopping: 72 percent
  • Dining: 65 percent
  • Other retail and entertainment: 25 percent
  • Recreational activities: 22 percent
  • Outdoor seating and plaza: 18 percent
  • Cultural amenities/events: 17 percent
  • Medical services: 13 percent
  • Educational opportunities: 5 percent
  • Child care: 3 percent
  • Office space: 2 percent

Total respondents: 968

Food and fun dominated the list of top amenities for residents in the East Area. Ranked highest were Grocery Shopping and Dining, both choices that were selected as “top 3” by the majority of respondents, followed by Other Retail and Entertainment, and Recreational Activities. Respondents expressed much less interest in prioritizing economic development amenities like childcare, educational opportunities, and office space.

 

Graphic showing survey results on amenities in the East Area.

Question: "Please tell us how friendly the East Area is for pedestrians, including the quality of sidewalks and ease of access to amenities. Walking in the East Area is . . ."

  • Very easy - 10% of 1,039 respondents
  • Fairly easy - 45%
  • Not easy - 45%

Many felt that walking was not very safe on and around Colfax due to speeding cars, difficult crossings, and crime. There is also a well-documented lack of sidewalks in some areas, as well as sections of sidewalks needing repair.

Source: East Area Kick-Off Survey, 2017

Graphic illustrating survey results on walkability in the East Area.

Question: "Please tell us how friendly the East Area is for cyclists, including the quality of bicycle facilities and ease of access to amenities. Biking in the East Area is . . .

  • Very easy - 8% of 990 respondents
  • Fairly easy - 47%
  • Not easy - 45%

Respondents asked for more and better bike facilities, specifically to improve connectivity between bike lanes and provide better access to local transit stops.

Source: East Area Kick-Off Survey, 2017

Graphic illustrating survey results on bikeability in the East Area.

Question: "Please tell us how often you use public transit in the East Area. I take East Area local transit . . ."

  • Frequently - 10% of 1,029 respondents
  • Occasionally - 24%
  • Rarely - 30% 
  • Never - 36%

Most community members surveyed stated they take local public transit rarely (30%) or never (36%). Many provided comments stating local transit options are not reliable enough, or should run more frequently. Some respondents also noted that transit amenities (such as bus shelters) should be improved, especially along Colfax.

Graphic illustrating survey results on transit use in the East Area.

Question: "Please tell us about housing options in the East Area by selecting all that apply. The East Area has good housing options for…”

  • Families - 81% of 941 respondents agree
  • Young professionals - 72% agree
  • Seniors - 39% agree
  • Low-income residents - 30% agree
  • Disabiled residents - 12% agree

Many community members felt that the area lacks affordable housing options for many groups and, further, that housing costs in the area are rapidly increasing. Respondents expressed concern that this would lead to less diversity in the area over time, and that new, higher-density and expensive housing development was affecting the area’s historical character.

 

Graphic showing survey results on housing in East Area.

Question: "Please tell us your opinion on the businesses in the East Area. The local businesses in the East Area _____ my daily needs."

  • Meet most of - 29% of 1,024 respondents
  • Meet some of - 49%
  • Don't meet - 22%

The community agrees that businesses in the East Area meet “most” or “some’ of their daily needs, and that the area’s local, independent businesses are part of what makes it a great place to live. However, many also expressed concern about certain pockets of Colfax they felt have too many fast food restaurants, too many empty store fronts, and generally a lack of retailers that serve the community’s needs.

Graphic illustrating survey results on local businesses in the East Area.

Question: "Please tell us how safe you feel in the East Area. I feel safe in the East Area . . . "

  • Always - 8% of 1,032 respondents
  • Usually - 67%
  • Rarely - 15%

While most of the community reported feeling safe “usually” in the East area (67%), many also expressed concern with local crime, drug use in public areas, and panhandling. Many respondents left comments reporting what they felt was an increase in local property crime, and some stated they did not feel safe walking along Colfax.

 

Graphic illustrating survey results on safety in the East Area.

 

About the East Planning Area

The East Planning Area includes the statistical neighborhoods adjacent to Colfax Avenue between Colorado Boulevard and Yosemite Street (Denver's eastern city limit), including South Park Hill, Montclair, Hale, and East Colfax. The area contains many great community assets, such as historic parkways, the Rose Medical Center, Johnson and Wales University, and many unique, locally-owned businesses. The area is experiencing some significant changes, such as the 9th and Colorado mixed use project, as well as plans to add Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) along Colfax Avenue. Two of the four neighborhoods, South Park Hill and East Colfax, have out of date plans, while Hale and Montclair have no plans at all. The Neighborhood Planning Initiative provides a great opportunity to establish the community’s vision for maintaining and enhancing the quality of life in these neighborhoods for decades to come.

Currently, the East planning area is zoned according to the following breakdown:

58%  Urban edge context
30%  Urban context
5%  Former Chapter 59 (Old Code) Zoning
5%  Other (Campus, Open space, Urban center contexts) 
5%  General Urban context

Pie chart showing zoning breakdown for East planning area

To help inform the NPI Strategic Plan, the city developed data-based indicators of planning need at the neighborhood scale. Click here to read more about the indicators.

Table showing planning need indicator scores

Text translation of above infographic (PDF)

Statistics
  • Area: 4.55 square miles
  • Population: 31,173 people
  • Housing units: 15,434 units
Regional destinations
  • Rose Medical Center
  • Johnson and Wales University
Natural features
  • Lindsley Park
  • Mayfair Park
  • Montclair Park
  • Westerly Creek
Key corridors
  • 23rd Avenue
  • Montview Boulevard
  • 17th Avenue
  • Colfax Avenue
  • 13th Avenue
  • 6th Avenue
  • Colorado Boulevard
  • Monaco Parkway
  • Quebec Street
  • Yosemite Street

 

Neighborhoods