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Denver Logo & Seal


City & County of Denver Logo

The Denver D logo is available for use by city employees of the City and County of Denver for city department/agency purposes. The Denver logo may not be distributed to external entities without a licensing agreement.

The Denver D logo may be distributed to entities with which the City and County of Denver has executed a contract that includes, at a minimum, the following terms and conditions: required usage guidelines to include duration of use; purpose of use; and the corresponding collateral or samples of where the Denver D logo will be placed.

For any entity to be considered for a licensing agreement authorizing them to use the Denver D logo, the city must be playing an active role in event or partnership or have a paid, documented sponsorship agreement. Any sponsorship package must include phrasing that defines the acknowledgment of city support.

We do not release high-resolution files to employees. Approved vendors can request logo files from Denver Marketing and Media Services. If you are currently working with an approved vendor, please have your vendor contact us at marketing@denvergov.org. to obtain those files.

Logo Element Breakdown

icon, logotype, and tagline identified on denver logo

The City and County of Denver logo consists of three main elements: The primary D icon, the DENVER logotype and tagline. Each of these elements has been custom-created and should never be recreated or re-typeset.

To maintain consistency and create a strong visual identity, the Denver logo should only be used from existing digital files. Please DO NOT use the Denver D icon without the DENVER logotype and tagline unless expressly permitted by the Denver Marketing & Media Services Office.

 

Primary Logo

Primary Denver Logo

The horizontal version of the Denver logo (D icon to the left of the logotype) is the preferred logo format. The logo utilizes the typeface Avenir Black for both DENVER and the tagline. Please refer to Typefaces (link to Typefaces page) when looking for complementary fonts to use. The Avenir font is restricted to the parent logo and should not be used for programmatic logos or for city collateral.

The distance to the right of the D icon and to left of the type should remain consistent. This distance is determined by the distance between the bottom of the tagline to the bottom of the DENVER logotype, represented by the letter X. The distance from the right edge of the D icon to the left edge of the logotype should be equal to X. The block of text in its entirety is centered vertically with the D icon. Each of these elements has been custom-created by the Denver Marketing Office and should never be recreated or re-typeset.

 

Secondary Logo

Denver Primary Logo Stacked

When the horizontal version of the Denver logo will not work with your space or design requirements, the secondary, stacked logo version can be used. Again, the distance between the bottom of the D icon and top of the DENVER logotype should be equal to X. The block of text in its entirety is centered horizontally with the D icon. Each of these elements has been custom-created by the Denver Marketing Office and should never be recreated or re-typeset.

 

Clear Zone

The Denver logo should always have an area of open space or “clear zone” around it. No other graphic elements should fall within this area around the logo.

Image of Denver Logo showing clear zones around logo

Minimum Sizes

The Denver logo should always be used at an appropriate size to make sure it is legible. When the primary signature is used, it should be no smaller than 7/8” wide at the widest point. The secondary signature should be used no smaller than 5/8” at its widest point.

Logo Colors

The Denver logo color palette is comprised of five colors that represent this vibrant city. Spot-color printing is the preferred option and should be used whenever possible. However, four color process printing may be used when spot color printing is not available or cost effective. When the logo is used on the on screen, the RGB format should be used and hex values should be used for the web. The Denver logo spot colors and their corresponding four-color process, RGB and hex formulas are listed below. The color samples in this guide are just a visual representation of the colors and should not be used as an accurate color match. Actual Pantone chips should be used to match colors when printing.

Image of Denver Logo with color diagrams

Color Name 4 Color Process RGB HEX Code Color
Brick Red CMYK: 0, 100, 100, 20 RGB: 160, 0, 34 #C4161C  
Sky Blue CMYK: 75, 15, 0, 0 RGB: 0, 150, 214 #0096D6  
Sunshine Gold CMYK: 0, 25, 80, 0 RGB: 253, 185, 19 #FDB913  
Mountain Purple CMYK: 80, 100, 0, 25 RGB: 64, 15, 96 #491D74  
Process Black (80%) CMYK: 0, 0, 0, 80 RGB: 88, 89, 91 #58595B  

Logo Usage

FULL COLOR (for white backgrounds) 

Full Color Denver Logo Image


FULL COLOR REVERSE (for dark backgrounds)

Denver Logo Full Color Reversed Image

A reverse version of the Denver logo has been developed for use when the logo appears on black or other dark colors. The D is not actually reversed, but uses a white border to separate it from the background. The logotype and tagline are white instead of black to increase legibility. Use the regular signature on backgrounds with a color that has a tonal equivalency of 15% or less black and the reverse signature on backgrounds with a color that has a tonal equivalency of more than 15% black.

 

SINGLE COLOR BLACK (for white backgrounds)

Image of Single Black Color Denver Logo on white background

An alternate version of the Denver logo has been developed to be used when only one color is available. One-color logos should only be used as an alternative to the preferred full color version. It should not be used in four-color process printing or in RGB formats, where you can use a full color version instead.


SINGLE COLOR REVERSE (for dark backgrounds)

White Denver Logo reverse on color background image

When only one color is available and the logo appears on black or another dark color, a single color reverse usage should be used. In this version, the primary D icon is used with a white border with the colored elements reversed to the background color.

 

Common Logo Misuses

Image of Logo with D Stacked on top of letters incorrectly

DO NOT repostion the logo.

 

 

Image of text being added to Denver D to make a word

DO NOT use the Primary D icon as a decorative capital letter.
 

 

Full Color Denver Logo image on gray background with bad contrast

DO NOT use the logo on a background without sufficient contrast.

 

Denver Logo Image with filled in outlines

DO NOT use the one-color reversed logo where the primary D icon is solid white.

 

Denver Logo with really bad colors applied to it

DO NOT change the colors of the logo.

 

 

Denver logo stretched horizontally

DO NOT distort or stretch the logo, make sure it is always scaled proportionately.
 

 

Denver Logo with Sun element missing from D section

DO NOT use the logo without all the necessary elements.

 

 

Denver Logo on image based background with no contrast

DO NOT place the logo on a photographic background without sufficient contrast.
 

 
 

Denver logo image with another logo stacked right on top of it

DO NOT use the logo in a way that violates the minimum clear space, especially when co-branding.
 

 

Denver Logo with incorrect alternate font applied next to the Denver D logo

DO NOT use the D icon locked up with any other typeface.
 

 
 

OFFICES & AGENCIES WITHIN THE CITY

Offices within the city are able to use their own unique logo, as outlined below. It is also acceptable for the office to use the main City and County of Denver logo if they choose.

Department and Agency Logos 
Denver Public Works Logo

To maintain the integrity of the City and County of Denver logo when branding departments, offices and agencies within the city, the logo will still be comprised of three elements. The D icon and DENVER logotype will remain, but the name of the department will take the place of the tagline, THE MILE HIGH CITY. Each of these elements have already been custom-created by the Denver Marketing Office and should never be recreated or re-typeset.

When the name of the department is too long to fit onto one line, the text will flow to the second (or third, if applicable) line. The top of the department name will remain on the same level. Please refer to page 5 for reverse and one-color usage.

Agency or department names should not use the word “DENVER” in department name to avoid redundancy, and acronyms in the department name are not permissible.


Denver Public Health and Environment Logo

Example of Division Level Logo within a Department

Divisions Within Departments and Agencies

When branding programs that are contained within the city’s departments, offices and agencies, a new type configuration applies. The name of the program is set first in the position and ratio indicated below. The name of the parent department, office or agency moves to the second line, and always follows the word “Denver.” Division names should not use the word “DENVER” in division name to avoid redundancy, and acronyms in the department name are not permissible.

If the name of the division is too long to fit onto one line, it should flow to the second line. As with the primary Denver logo, the distance to the right of the D icon and to left of the type should remain consistent within program logos. Note that in these applications, all text elements move to align to the top of the D icon.


Taglines

Taglines, mission statements, etc. should not be locked up with agency level or the division level logo.

 

Exceptions

Independent agencies such as the three divisions of the Department of Safety, Denver International Airport (DEN), Denver Public Library, Denver Zoo, Denver Botanic Gardens, are permitted to use independent logos. The Denver D logo should still be co-branded with these agencies whenever appropriate.

PROGRAM/EVENT LOGOS

Any office/agency/department operating solely under the City and County of Denver, exclusively funded with taxpayer dollars and/or at the direction of the mayor should be using the Denver D as its primary logo. There is a hold on any program logos for the time being.

However, there are instances when a venue, event, or partnership with an external entity/entities warrants its own visual identity. In those scenarios, some basic quality assurances should always be considered.

Some guidelines to consider when designing a new program identity:

 

  • Logos & Symbols | Style matters. The symbol reflects Denver’s energy, the amazing weather, outdoor lifestyle and economic vitality through the incorporation of the shining sun, blue skies, majestic mountains and downtown landscape. When creating a new program identity, try to be compatible with the design feel established by the Denver “D” icon.

  • Brand Recognition | It’s important for our audiences to understand which programs are affiliated with the city. Please use the City and County of Denver logo and identity prominently on all materials. In applications where the Denver D cannot be featured prominently, such as on an independent website, please include prominent text explaining the affiliation with the city (e.g. “Red Rocks Amphitheater is a proud venue of the City and County of Denver.”)

  • Co-Branding | Consider what other logos will appear with the new one and try to complement, instead of competing with them.

  • Color Palette | Always use colors from the approved palette. See page 12 for expanded colors.

  • Typefaces | When it comes to font personality, a little goes a long way. Try to stay within the Franklin Gothic font family when possible.

  • Simplification | Logos should rarely have more than a couple colors and distinct elements (mark, typeface, tagline).

  • Scalability | Logos should have the ability to be used in very large or very small formats, meaning that high resolution versions should be developed and too many elements should be avoided.

  • Section 508 Web Color Contrast | Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 1.0) require that there be a sufficient level of tonal contrast between colors so that low-vision users can read content on colored backgrounds. Guidelines for ensuring color combinations include:


City Seal

Denver City Seal Image

 

The city seal is to be reserved for official city documents or correspondence from the Mayor, City Council, and other Denver elected officials. Official documents include, but are not limited to, proclamations, legal documents, tax liens, and death certificates. To the extent reasonable, city agencies and departments must transition to the updated business systems package for regular city business. The business system package includes letterhead, envelopes, and business cards which are widely available.

As appropriate, all marketing, informational and informal material – including websites, uniforms, brochures, and other collateral material – should include the Denver D logo and exclude the city seal. If you have any questions regarding logo usage policies, please contact the Denver Marketing & Media Services. If you have any questions regarding legal considerations around the use of the city seal, please contact the City Attorney’s Office.

 

The City Flag

Denver city flag

 

The city flag graphic is not to be used as a replacement for the Denver D logo. The city flag image is to be associated only with an actual flag representing the City and County of Denver. All materials currently showcasing the city flag as a graphic image need to be phased out and replaced with the D logo (e.g., employee badges, city vehicles, brochures, etc.). The city flag image is protected by common law rights.

 

Location & Hours
1437 Bannock St. Room 002
Denver, CO 80202
Hours: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

 


denver 8 engaging the city logo