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Park Attractions

With the Rocky Mountains as a backdrop, Denver's park system connects people throughout the city with the great outdoors. Denver parks are an intersection of nature and urban environments; of historical design and innovation; of public and private partnerships; and of arts and culture.

The park system serves the city's diverse neighborhoods with expansive open green spaces, pocket parks, tree-lined streets, historic parkways and regional trails. 

Chief Hosa Lodge
Located in Genesee Park, the Chief Hosa Lodge was built in 1918. The Lodge’s namesake is Little Raven, an Arapahoe tribal leader who was charged with keeping peace in the area. He was given “Hosa” as an honorary title; which in the Ute language means peaceful and beautiful.

Montclair Civic Building (aka The Molkery)
Completed in 1888 by Walter Baron Von Richtofen, this historic building began as a Consumptive Resort for tuberculosis patients. After Denver’s annexation of Montclair in 1911, the city purchased the building making it the oldest community center in the system.

City Park Pavilion
The City Park Pavilion is centrally located within the grounds of Denver’s first park, City Park. Although originally purchased in 1878, it was in 1882 that Henry Meryweather designed the original layout of the park modeling it after English pastoral gardens. As part of Denver’s historic “City Beautiful” campaign at the turn of the century, the landmark pavilion was added to the grounds.

The Washington Park Boathouse
Born out of the “City Beautiful” campaign in the early 20th century, the boathouse was constructed in 1913 by architect Jacques Benedict, who also built Chief Hosa Lodge. The concept of the original park was to provide citizens with parks and facilities to transform Denver into the “Paris of the West”. 165 acres were purchased from 1899-1908 for flower beds and garden grounds.

Denver Mountain Parks make up a cohesive system of significant lands connected by watersheds, forests, sensitive ecosystems, trails, and scenic drives. Each park has its own distinct character, but the system as a whole shares an audience, uses, geography, character, and historic integrity. Learn more.

The South Platte River can be accessed from the following parks:

  • Confluence
  • Grant Frontier
  • Johnson Habitat
  • Overland Pond
  • Pasquinel's Landing
  • Weir Gulch

Tour our unique public art collection located throughout more than 67 significant park and public sites across Denver.

Denver Sister City Parks

Denver Sister Cities International is a creative force for international cooperation and understanding through citizen involvement and participation. Join us and become a part of the global community!

PICKLEBALL is a fun game that is a cross between tennis and ping-pong. The game is easy for beginners to learn but can be a fast-paced, competitive game for experienced players as well.

There are several indoor and outdoor pickleball courts throughout our parks and recreation centers:

Indoor pickleball courts:
Aztlan Recreation Center
Athmar Recreation Center
Cook Park Recreation Center

Eisenhower Recreation Center
Harvard Gulch Recreation Center
Hiawatha Davis Recreation Center
Montbello Recreation Center
Montclair Recreation Center
Scheitler Recreation Center
Stapleton Recreation Center
Twentieth St. Recreation Center
Washington Park Recreation Center

Outdoor pickleball courts:
Skyland Park
Congress Park

All courts are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Don’t forget your paddle! Parks and recreation centers do not provide paddles.

Disc Golf courses are located at:

  • 42nd & Libson Park
  • Paco Sanchez Park

A slackline course with varying degrees of difficulty is located at Harvard Gulch Park (between recreation center and golf course).

Areas designated for skateboarding can be found at the following parks:

  • Elyria
  • Parkfield
  • Town Center
  • Greenway
  • Denver Skate Park

Five Denver lakes are open or boating from  April 1 - November 1. Length of the boating season is subject to adequate water quality and lake depths:

  • Sloan's Lake (motor & non-motorized*)
  • Rocky Mountain Lake (non-motorized)
  • Berkeley Lake (non-motorized)
  • Smith Lake at Washington Park (non-motorized)
  • Ferril Lake at City Park (non-motorized)

*Non-motorized includes: hand-launched fishing, human-powered sail and electric-powered boats

Learn more about boating in Denver.