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Neighborhood Sidewalk Repair

 

Neighborhood Sidewalk Repair Program

Denver’s Neighborhood Sidewalk Repair Program is addressing sidewalks, citywide, that are damaged, uneven, or sloping excessively, to ensure our City has a well-maintained sidewalk network and better conditions for travelling. Denver Public Works has identified 11 sidewalk regions by grouping neighborhoods into roughly comparable areas, and will begin by addressing one region at a time, using criteria based on community feedback gathered in the Denver Moves: Pedestrians & Trails plan.

Per city ordinance, Denver property owners are responsible for the repair and maintenance of sidewalks adjacent to their properties. To help with the repairs, the City will offer extended repayment assistance and affordability discounts for property owners who qualify. The City is also authorizing less expensive repair methods not previously allowed, such as grinding and crack filling.

 

Program Implementation

In 2018, Denver Public Works will begin formal inspections at properties in Region 1, including the neighborhoods of City Park, Congress Park, Cherry Creek, Country Club, Cheesman Park, Speer, Capitol Hill and North Capitol Hill. (See region maps - PDF)

Public Works will contact property owners whose sidewalks are in need of repair and provide additional information on repair requirements, estimated costs, extended repayment, and affordability programs, including extended repayment assistance and affordability discounts for those who qualify. Adjacent property owners will need to correct violations on their own or can choose to have Public Works complete the work based on a set fee schedule.

 

What if I have flagstone sidewalks in need of repair?

Owners of single family residences and duplexes have the option of utilizing the city to 1) relevel their flagstone and 2) replace flagstone with concrete. White or red-tinted concrete may be used to blend the concrete in with the flagstone.

Property owners who want to replace damaged flagstone with new flagstone should contact a flagstone company or supplier.

Where appropriate, the ground beneath the flagstone (the subgrade) can be releveled and the intact flagstone put back in place. If a piece of flagstone breaks into more than two pieces upon removal, it cannot be placed back into the sidewalk.

Owners of multi-family and commercial properties will need to hire their own contractor to relevel flagstone, replace flagstone with concrete, or replace damaged flagstone with new flagstone.

If a sidewalk has been identified for repair, a notice will be posted on the door of the property and a copy will be sent by mail to the property owner. 

Renters who receive a sidewalk notice on their door should notify the landlord, property manager or property owner. City ordinance does not hold renters responsible for making sidewalk repairs.

Property owners are responsible for responding to the notice. Financial assistance is only available for owner-occupied properties.

 

What is the city’s stance on trees that are impacting sidewalks?

The city views trees as valuable assets. The goal of the sidewalk repair program is to find creative solutions to address sidewalk safety when the roots of healthy trees are lifting sidewalks. Options may include going around a tree root or over it or trimming a root, if no damage would occur to the tree as a result. 

All tree work done as part of Denver’s Neighborhood Sidewalk Repair Program will be performed by a licensed tree contractor.

Denver residents can find a list of licensed tree contractors at www.denvergov.org/forestry

Owners of commercial properties and multi-family residences have the option of hiring their own contractor and may be able to do some repairs themselves.

See a list of contractors licensed to perform repairs in the right of way (PDF - July 2018)

See the DIY Guide for Hazardous Sidewalks (PDF)

The affordability program will not be available to these properties. 

 

The goal of the NSRP is to address damaged, sloping, and uneven sidewalks; it is not installing missing sidewalks.

Learn more about the city's separate initiative that is working to fill gaps in the sidewalk network »

Residents may report hazardous sidewalks outside the region in which the repair program is operating. No anonymous complaints are accepted.

  • The City allows one complaint per year per complainant and will not accept lists of complaints or multiple addresses. 
  • Complaints with an appearance of harassment or discrimination will be discarded and similar new ones will not be accepted.

To make a report, contact 311 or a City Council representative.

Property owners outside the region who are noticed for hazardous sidewalks must use their own contractor and will not be eligible to utilize the city’s sidewalk repair contractor or sidewalk repair affordability program.