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Coordinated Bike Lane Striping & Installation


Beginning in 2020, Denver's Department of Transportation and Infrastructure will speed up implementation of its bike program with a new approach, including coordinating the striping of bike lanes with street paving operations.

 

DOTI is committed to implementing a network of better bike facilities in our city that make it more comfortable and viable for people to ride bikes, and to creating a bike network that connects people to the places they want to go.

Upcoming Virtual Bikeway Open Houses

DOTI will be leading Virtual Open Houses for bikeway projects. The links to join these meetings are below. Click on the link to register today, or join by clicking on the link the day and time that the meeting starts. 

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For questions, email bikes@denvergov.org

The Second Public Open House for this project was held as a Virtual Open House! 

During this meeting, DOTI shared what we heard through the outreach process, presented the bikeway design for the corridor, discussed the removal of parking from both sides of the street to accommodate the bike lane, and answered questions about next steps. 

E Jewell Ave Bikeway Virtual Open House Recording

  • Held on: July 16, 2020
  • Meeting Link (YouTube)
  • View a FAQ developed based on questions submitted during the July 16th meeting (PDF)

The bike lane will be implemented from S Cherry St to S Oneida St in August 2020.

On February 4, 2020, DOTI joined a neighborhood meeting to provide information to the community about a bike lane on E. Jewell Avenue from S. Bellaire Street to S. Oneida Street, which was identified in the Denver Moves: Bikes Plan. This bikeway will provide a safe, comfortable and convenient connection to the I-25 Bike/Ped Bridge to Colorado Station on the west, and on the east, connect to the proposed bike lane on S Oneida St. This street connects to Cook Park and the Cherry Creek Trail.

A portion of E. Jewell Avenue will be paved in 2020, which provides the opportunity to coordinate installation of the bikeway following paving of the street, resulting in greater efficiency.

See the information boards (PDF)

The Second Public Open House for this project was held April 23, 2020!

The intent of this meeting was to share the bikeway design for the corridor, present impacts, and answer questions. 

W Jewell Ave Bikeway Virtual Open House Recording

February 2020 Neighborhood Meeting

On February 18, 2020, DOTI joined a neighborhood meeting to provide information to the community about a bike lane on W. Jewell Avenue from S. Federal Boulevard to S. Lipan Street that was identified in our Denver Moves: Bikes plan. The intent of this meeting was to share existing conditions on the corridor and receive input from the community, take comments, and answer questions.

This bikeway will provide a safe, comfortable and convenient connection to the commercial area on Federal Boulevard on the west, and on the east, provide bike access to Ruby Hill Park and bike park.  This street will be the first paving project in the neighborhood and will be followed by a bike lane project south of W. Jewell Avenue on S. Zuni Street in coming years.

Similarly, the extent of W. Jewell Avenue between S. Federal Boulevard and S. Lipan Street will be paved in 2020, which provides the opportunity to coordinate installation of the bikeway following paving of the street, resulting in greater efficiency. 

See the information boards (PDF)

See the fact sheet - ADA readable version (PDF)

The Second Public Open House for this project was held as a Virtual Open House! 

During this meeting, DOTI shared what we heard through the outreach process, present the bikeway design for the corridor, discuss the removal of parking from both sides of the street to accommodate the bike lane, and answered questions about next steps.

E Dartmouth Ave Bikeway Virtual Open House Recording

February 2020 Neighborhood Meeting

On February 12, 2020, DOTI joined a neighborhood meeting to provide information to the community about a buffered bike lane on E. Dartmouth Avenue from University Blvd to Colorado Blvd, which was identified in our Denver Moves: Bikes Plan. The intent of this meeting was to gain feedback on coordinating the bike lane installation with the road repaving from the community, take comments, and understand any other safety concerns on the corridor.

This portion of E. Dartmouth Avenue will be paved in 2020, which provides the opportunity to coordinate installation of the bikeway following paving of the street, resulting in greater efficiency. 

See the fact sheet (PDF)

See the fact sheet - ADA readable version (PDF)

See the information boards (PDF)

Annually, DOTI coordinates the installation of bikeways recommended in Denver Moves: Bicycles, with annual paving activities, which results in greater efficency.

In 2021, W Kentucky Ave from Sheridan Blvd to Zuni St is scheduled to be repaved. The corridor currently has two travel lanes and no painted bike lane. Denver Moves: Bicycles includes the recommendation to install a bike lane on the corridor, though through a technical analysis a buffered bike lane is now necessary. Implementing a buffered bike lane will impact the existing cross-section of the road because on-street parking will be removed to accommodate the bikeway.

A Virtual Open House was held April 15th 2020. At this meeting, DOTI engaged with the community to gather input on the corridor's current travel patterns as well as existing barriers to biking that can be addressed through this project. Following this first meeting, draft designs will be presented in summer 2020.

DOTI intends to implement the bike lane following the repaving effort, which is scheduled to occur in 2021. We will be emailing RNOs with this information and delivering flyers to properties along the corridor in advance of the repaving work, to notify homeowners and businesses of the change in striping on the roadway that they will see following paving.

W Kentucky Ave Bikeway Virtual Open House Recording

See the fact sheet - ADA readable version (PDF)

Annually, DOTI coordinates the installation of bikeways recommended in Denver Moves: Bicycles, with annual paving activities, which results in greater efficency.

This year, E 1st Ave from N Quebec St to N Roslyn St is scheduled to be repaved. The corridor currently has three travel lanes, and no painted bike lane. Denver Moves: Bicycles includes the recommendation to install a bike lane on the corridor. Implementing a bike lane will not impact the existing cross-section of the road (three travel lanes will remain). A dedicated right turn lane on the westbound approach to N Quebec St will be removed to accomodate the bike lane.

DOTI intends to implement the bike lane following the repaving effort, which is scheduled to occur in mid-April. We will be emailing RNOs with this information and delivering flyers to properties along the corridor in advance of the repaving work, to notify homeowners and businesses of the change in striping on the roadway that they will see following paving.

Annually, DOTI coordinates the installation of bikeways recommended in Denver Moves: Bicycles, with annual paving activities, which results in greater efficency.

E 7th Ave Parkway from N Williams St to N Colorado Blvd started to be repaved in late March. The corridor currently has a painted bike lane, with no striped buffer. Denver Moves: Bicycles includes the recommendation to upgrade the corridor to a painted buffered bike lane, which will widen bike lane on the roadway between the travel lane the bike lane. Implementing a buffered bike lane will not impact the existing cross-section of the road (one travel lane, and one parking lane, will remain in both directions).

DOTI will be implementing a buffered bike lane in coordination with the repaving effort. We have emailed RNOs with this information, and delivered flyers to properties along the corridor in advance of the repaving work, to notify homeowners of the change in striping on the roadway that they will see following paving.

Annually, DOTI implements bikeways recommended in Denver Moves: Bicycles, with little to no impact to parking and travel lanes.

This year, E Mansfield Ave/Rosemary Way from S Monaco Pkwy to S Tamarac Dr is identified to be one of those low impact projects. Denver Moves: Bicycles includes the recommendation to install a bike lane which will connect existing bike facilities in the neighborhood. Implementing a bike lane will not impact the existing cross-section of the road (one travel lane, and one parking lane, will remain in both directions).

We will be delivering flyers to properties along the corridor in advance of the repaving work, which is scheduled to occur in April, to notify homeowners of the change in striping on the roadway that they will see following paving. View the construction notification flyer here.

Annually, Denver Department of Transportation and Infrastructure (DOTI) coordinates the installation of bikeways recommended in Denver Moves: Bicycles, with annual paving activities, which results in greater efficiency. In the next few weeks, W 13th Ave and W 14th Ave from Mariposa St to N Broadway will be repaved. Shortly after, protected bike lanes will be installed along W 13th Ave from N Lincoln St to the Platte River Trail, and on W 14th Ave from Mariposa St to Speer Blvd! This bikeway will connect to the existing protected bike lane on W 14th Ave, east of Speer Blvd. This project is funded through the Elevate Denver Bond Program. When complete - La Alma-Lincoln Park and Sun Valley will be connected to Downtown Denver, via a high-comfort bikeway! 

Changes to the street include:

  • On W 13th Ave from N Lincoln St to Mariposa St, a travel lane will be repurposed and converted into the protected bike lane.
  • West of Mariposa, on-street parking will be repurposed to accommodate the bike lane. Travel lanes will remain in both directions.
  • From Mariposa St to Kalamath St, parking on the south side of W 14th Ave will be repurposed to accommodate the bike lane. Two travel lanes, and parking on the north side of the street, will remain.
  • East of Kalamath St, a travel lane on W 14th Ave will be repurposed to accommodate the bike lane.

This project will improve transportation options, making it easier to get to the places that you want to go. Additional benefits include:

  • Safety is the number one priority of this project. Research indicates adding a protected bike lane to a roadway can reduce the risk of injury up to 90% for all commuters. Benefits for all roadway users include slower speeds, more predictability at intersections, and enhanced safety.
  • Protected bike lanes shorten the crossing distance for pedestrians and increase visibility of pedestrians, making it easier and safer to cross the street.
  • The project will provide dedicated space on the street for people on bikes, providing more transportation choice, which helps to manage congestion city-wide.
  • The design will increase comfort of riding and reduce potential conflicts between bicycles and cars.
  • Project will provide better connections to the places we want to go, such as schools, parks, trails, transit and shopping areas.

Properties along the corridor will be receiving mailers in the coming weeks, to notify homeowners and businesses of the change in striping on the roadway, which they will see following paving. The construction notification flyers that will be distributed this week are attached. 

The Second Public Open House for this project was held as a Virtual Open House! 

During this meeting, DOTI shared what we heard through the outreach process, presented the bikeway design for the corridor, discussed the removal of parking from both sides of the street to accommodate the bike lane, and answered questions about next steps. 

E Virginia Ave Bikeway Virtual Open House Recording

  • Held on: July 21, 2020
  • Meeting Link (YouTube)
  • A project FAQ will be posted soon!

The bike lane will be implemented from S Kearney St to S Niagara St in August 2020.

On January 21, 2020, DOTI joined a neighborhood meeting to provide information to the community about a bike lane on Virginia Avenue from Jersey Street to Quebec Street that was identified in our Denver Moves: Bikes plan. This bikeway will serve two schools and connects to the Garland Trail that leads to the Cherry Creek Trail.  

This stretch of road will be paved in 2020, which provides the opportunity to coordinate installation of the bikeway following paving of the street, resulting in greater efficiency. The intent of this meeting was to share these plans and receive input from the community, take comments, and answer questions.

See the presentation (PDF)

 

 

E Virginia Avenue FAQ

Answers to your most Frequently Asked Questions about the Virginia Avenue Bike Lane Project

Starting in January 2020, the City of Denver Department of Transportation and Infrastructure (DOTI) has conducted community outreach for the Virginia Avenue bikeway project.  This dialogue has been through a public meeting (Jan 21) and multiple small group (May 26) and one-on-one stakeholder meetings (Jan 17, Mar 12, Jun 2, Jun 3, Jun 5).  The following are questions that have been most frequently asked during this dialogue and responses prepared by the project team.

Community feedback collected in planning efforts like Blueprint Denver/Denveright and Denver Moves: Bicycles have shown that Virginia Ave is an ideal corridor for a bike lane because it connects destinations like schools, trails and other proposed bikeways in the neighborhood.

The 2011 Denver Moves Bike Plan, and subsequent updates, set the goal of getting every household within a ¼-mile of a high “ease-of-use” bikeway.   Virginia Ave forms part of the overall bike network of facilities within ¼-mile of each other citywide.   This is shown within context of the larger bike network in the image below. Over the next three years, Denver will implement more than 100 miles of high-comfort bikeways, completing local bike networks and connecting more Denverites to safe and comfortable streets.

Enlarged Map Image (jpg)

Virginia Ave forms part of the overall bike network of facilities within ¼-mile of each other citywide.  This is shown within context of the larger bike network

Some bicyclists are comfortable riding on any road, with or without a bicycle lane.  However, it is a city-wide goal is to increase the number of people bicycling, especially those who do not bicycle today because they don’t feel comfortable doing so. Research of metro-Denverites indicated that only about 16% of people feel comfortable riding on Denver’s streets today; the majority of people (59%) would bicycle, but only if safe, convenient bikeways are provided. Expanding bicycle infrastructure, such as the E Virginia Ave bike lane, is intended to serve the 59% of bicyclists. 

In 2017, Denver adopted its Vision Zero Action Plan. The key tenet of Vision Zero is that no traffic facility or serious injury is acceptable, and Denver should actively work towards eliminating these events on its roadways. Bicycle lanes have a documented safety benefit for people on bikes and other users of the road. Research from cities across the US (including Denver) demonstrates that cities with more high-quality bike infrastructure have 44% fewer traffic deaths and injuries overall.  Installing bike lanes on appropriate streets is one tool that Denver can use to achieve its Vision Zero goal.

A citywide network of bicycle lanes is part of Denver’s plan to keep our transportation system operational.  As Denver grows and densifies, our streets cannot grow with it.  With limited space, we can’t design our streets to serve rush hour commutes assuming all travel takes place by single occupancy vehicles anymore. For Denver to continue to grow without choking on congestion, we need to make it easier for people to go to work and to school, to childcare, to parks and groceries and local businesses without relying on a car. Across the US, 46% of all the driving trips that people make are less than 3 miles long—and in urban areas, 49% of vehicle trips are 3 miles of shorter. 22% of driving trips are less than a mile long (23% in urban areas).  Since bicycles are ideal vehicles for this distance trip, they can serve as a viable transportation mode for most people for most trips if proper infrastructure is in place.

In addition, securing a working transportation system long-term, shifting transportation modes away from single-occupancy vehicles is necessary to reduce the City’s climate change footprint and reduce health-harming emissions.  Bike lanes, like this one planned on Virginia Ave, contribute to causing that modal shift.

image of what the Virgina Avenue Bike Lane will look like when the project is completed

People frequently call streets, “our streets,” or, ”our parking”, but these titles overlook how roads as public spaces are not owned by individuals. The public streets in Denver are a public good, maintained and operated by DOTI to provide benefits to people beyond those who live adjacent to streets. It is DOTI’s responsibility to assess the use of this public good, and ensure that the highest-and-best use is maintained, which is determined by planning documents, including DenverRight, Blueprint Denver, Denver Movesthat represent the vision thousands of Denver’s people.

Additionally, each house along Virginia (aside for those from Monaco to Niagra) front a side street. Meaning they are corner houses. For the 13 houses that are not on a corner or their corner doesn’t allow parking (Monaco), they have access to a side street either adjacent or across the street within 200 feet,  or roughly 4 houses. There is a large network of streets in the neighborhood that have available on street parking.

To assess the benefits of on-street parking and trade-offs, DOTI conducted parking use studies on Virginia Ave.  These studies show that current use of on-street parking is quite low: 15% of the lane is utilized at typical peak times of the week.  While we recognize that some residents perceive great value in having on-street parking available, it is not the best use of this valuable space given its current utilization.

In order to determine the effects of any project that changes conditions and uses on the city right-of-way, DOTI collects data on existing conditions.  Since this project will remove on-street parking, DOTI staff conducted parking use studies throughout the corridor.  DOTI follows an approved parking utilization analysis process that collects data at three different points in time to provide a wholistic picture of use.  Per DOTI’s approved parking utilization analysis process, utilization of parking is collected during the weekday in the morning, weekday day, and a weekend mid-day.  DOTI classifies utilization rates into three categories: low use between 0 and 25% used, medium between 25 and 75% and high use between 75 and 100%.

For this project, data was collected on October 16, 2019 and January 28, 2020.  Overall, the rates of use were all low.

This data was originally taken on a weekday evening from 7:00PM to 9:00PM (best practices indicate this is when most people are home with their cars parked) and a weekend Saturday Mid-day 1:00PM and 3:00PM (based on typical peak activity periods). Based off feedback from a Community Meeting for this project held in January, we also collected data on-street parking use during a weekday from 2:00PM to 4:00PM (during school session and pick-up for George Washington high School and the Denver Green School).  You can review the parking study data here.  These studies found that utilization of parking to be relatively low.  Even during the highest period of utilization from data collected, between 2:00PM and 4:00PM on a weekday, on-street parking use in the project area was less than 15%.  During a less than 2-hr period, two blocks, at Locust St. and Magnolia St. experience parking utilization of more than 50%.  This utilization is for a highly-confined period of time associated with school drop-off and pick-up activities.  The blocks surrounding these blocks have utilization near zero during this time, allowing for easy overflow of parking available during the that short time period.  Consequently, the study concluded that overall impacts of repurposing the parking lane for this project purpose was determined to have minimal safety or mobility impacts.

Yes. There are several major institutions along Virginia Ave that are daily or weekly travel destinations for those within the neighborhood and the broader community.  These include George Washington High School, the Denver Green School, and the BMH-BJ congregation.  DOTI staff are conducting multiple one-on-one stakeholder meetings with representatives of each of these institutions to identify specific concerns and opportunities that result from this project.  Staff will work to address these considerations as much as possible within the bike lane design.

Roadway speeds are collected to determine safety conditions of the corridor and in turn inform the bikeway design.  Research indicates that visually narrowing a roadway through striping or other indicators can cause vehicle drivers to travel at more moderate speeds.  Bike lanes are believed to help provide traffic calming benefits and research shows that communities with more extensive bicycle infrastructure have fewer traffic related injuries and deaths.  Studies of speed on the corridor indicated a moderate speeding concern on Virginia Ave.  Therefore, a potential co-benefit of this bike lane project is overall reduced vehicle speeds and enhanced safety for all users, not just bicyclists, on the roadway.

Speed data was collected on Virginia Street via a road tube laid on the corridor. Road tubes are used to detect vehicle axles by sensing air pulses that are created by each axle (tire) strike of the tube in the roadway and can detect both the number and speed of passing vehicles.   Tube counts provide the most accurate speed data and are thus preferred to other data collection methods such as a speed radar gun. This road tube was laid on Virginia Ave east of Magnolia St. This location was chosen as it most closely represented a typical section of the neighborhood: bounded by 4 way stop intersections, within a residential area, and adjacent to a school.   The tube collected counts on Wednesday, October 16th over a 24-hour period, thus providing a snapshot of vehicle speeds and volumes at all times of day.  The speed study, which is linked here, show that most vehicles (the 85th percentile) are traveling at or below 29mph on Virginia Ave, which is 4mph over the local road speed limit of 25mph.  This indicates a modest speeding concern.

Note that traffic engineers rely on the 85th percentile rule to help assess speed data. Statistically, the 85th percentile speed is slightly greater than the speed is that one standard deviation above the mean of a normal distribution. The theory behind this approach is that most drivers will travel at a speed that is reasonable and prudent for a given roadway segment.   If the 85th percentile of vehicles are traveling significantly above the speed limit, traffic engineers will consider treatments on the road (physical or visually narrow or bending the road) to help queue drivers to slow down. Most U.S. jurisdictions report using the 85th percentile speed.

In order to determine the effects of any project that changes conditions and uses on the city right-of-way, DOTI collects data on existing conditions. Consequently, the project team conducted a traffic study, a crash study, and a speed study.  A traffic study, which looks at how well traffic flows through intersections, shows if there is traffic congestion or delays on a roadway.  The traffic study that took traffic movement counts at 4 intersections (Monaco, Niagara, Oneida, and Quebec) and determined that traffic flow will not be adversely affected by the bicycle lane. 

Yes. In order to install  bike lanes on this corridor,  parking will be removed from both sides of the street.  In designing this corridor, it was determined that in accommodating a bike facility that meets citywide goals and meets standards for a safe bicycle lane width, a parking lane simply cannot fit within the existing right-of-way.

The existing right of way between the curbs on Virginia Ave is 36 feet The safe width of a bicycle lane is dependent on adjacent uses in the right-of-way.  When adjacent to the curb (as opposed to a vehicle or parking lane which require additional “shy” distance), a bike lane consistent with city standards must be least 6’ wide (to allow for 4’ of navigable surface adjacent to the 2-foot-wide gutter pan).   Vehicle travel lane widths on a typical local road consistent with city standards is 11 feet.   Virginia Ave can safely accommodate a vehicle travel lane and a bike lane each direction, but cannot also accommodate on-street parking.  The additional two feet available within the road will be used to provide buffer space between the vehicle lane and bike lane that enhances comfort for users. 

The Virginia Ave Bike Lane will be a buffered bicycle lane adjacent to the street curb.  This means the bike lane will be defined by multiple striped white lines that provide a buffer of street space between the curb and the bike lane as well as between the bike lane and the vehicle lane.  The bike lane will not include any vertical elements (e.g bollards, curbs).   This design is consistent with safety needs on a local street like for Virginia Ave and with city-wide plans adopted through a public process.  The picture below provides a good example of what the street will look like once the bicycle lane is complete.

image of what the Virginia Avenue Bike Lane will look like when completed

No. The proposed buffered bike lane will be separated from the curb by the roadside drainage area and a small buffer.  This space can therefore be used for depositing your city bins for pick-up while still allowing bicyclists five feet of travel space outside of the vehicle lane; a safe width.  Residents can plan on placing their waste bins in the same place as they have in the past after the bicycle lane is installed.

Since on-street parking along Virginia St will be removed as part of this project, visitors will not be able to park there.  All homes along this stretch of Virginia Ave front a side street (aside for those from Monaco to Niagra) and have driveways.  Meaning they are corner houses. For the 13 houses that are not on a corner or their corner doesn’t allow parking (Monaco), they have access to a side street either adjacent or across the street within 200 feet.

Residents should plan on having guests and other visitors arriving by vehicle to park on one of the many north/south streets in your neighborhood, or in your driveway.  If you would prefer vehicles not park in your driveway or they are too big to park there, they should plan on parking along an adjacent street.  All cross-streets along the project area, except for Quebec Street and Monaco Parkway have unrestricted parking and have very low utilization. Visitors are free to park along these streets and will have a short walk to any residence along Virginia Ave.

The Virginia corridor was a recommended bike lane location in multiple Denver Planning documents, as shown in the timeline below, most recently the 2019 adopted Denveright Plan. The Denver Moves plans, as well as the DenverRight plans engaged thousands of residents from across the City and County of Denver. These high-level plans identify locations of bicycle facilities to create the complete bicycle network identified in the goals of the plans and a facility type consistent with the roadway type.  Once a project is funded, project design and new outreach specific to the facility is commenced.  In this case, the Virginia Ave project was first brought to stakeholders in late 2019.  Project-specific outreach includes two public meetings, as well as individual and small group stakeholder meetings to identify specific project opportunities and challenges. A project website and email also provide opportunities for dialogue in between engagement events.

Timeline of East Virginia Avenue Bike Lane project

Your feedback can help us determine the final design of this project. Tell us how this bike lane can better serve the needs of your community while being a comfortable bike lane for residents citywide.  You can provide feedback at any of the outreach events or via email at bikes@denvergov.org.

Installation of this project is currently planned to be installed in coordination with repaving of Virginia Ave to take advantage of efficiencies for installation crews and reduce total time during which the roadway is under construction.  The repaving and installation of the bike is currently planned to take place in the fall of 2020.