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Current Storm/Sanitary Sewer Infrastructure Projects

 

Construction

The 35th Street Sanitary Improvement project will rehabilitate the sanitary sewer main in 35th Street. The project area includes 35th Street from Chestnut Place (west boundary) to Dexter Street (east boundary). See specific locations below. The purpose of the project is to improve the sanitary sewer main which is in need of repair. For more information visit: https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/transportation-infrastructure/programs-services/projects/35th-street-lining.html 

The City and County of Denver will be installing an improved, expanded storm drain system in E. Dakota Avenue beginning at S. Kearney Street and ending at the alley east of S. Holly Street. Additionally, new storm pipes will be installed in the alley north of E. Dakota Avenue between S. Holly and S. Ivy Streets and in the alley south of E. Dakota Avenue between S. Ivy and S. Jersey Streets.  This area experiences persistent, localized flooding because the existing alley sumps (low-point, water collection points) are undersized.  The street and alleys will be repaved once construction is complete. The purpose of the project is to reduce localized, nuisance flooding and increase pedestrian and driver safety during storm events. There may be temporary interruptions of utility services, including water service. Advance notice will be provided to the impacted residents.

Learn more about the General Storm Crestone Peak project »

The 27th Street Storm Interceptor Project will improve public infrastructure and safety, relieving drainage and flooding issues in Five Points, the Curtis Park neighborhood and the RiNo Art District. For more information  visit: https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/transportation-infrastructure/programs-services/projects/27th-street-storm.html

The 33rd Street Outfall project installed a storm sewer system to service the neighborhoods of Five Points, Whittier, and City Park West. This improves drainage during a five-year storm event and address areas where significant flooding could occur. For more information visit: https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/transportation-infrastructure/programs-services/projects/2019-archive/33rd-street-outfall.html

The Lincoln Park lining project will extend the life of the city sanitary system through a cost-effective technology that minimizes the impact to the citizens of Denver. A second benefit is to improve water and groundwater quality by lining existing sanitary systems that have cracks and may be leaking.

The Valverde storm project will improve drainage conditions in Basin 0064-02 by installing a 42" diameter storm pipe in W. Alameda Ave. and abandoning an existing undersized drainage system consisting of failing corroded metal pipe outside of the City ROW without easements. The project will convey storm water from the sumps on Decatur St., Dale Ct., and Clay St., to W. Alameda Ave. The 42" storm pipe will tie into the existing storm system near Bryant St. Other areas of work include water utility relocations, restoration of paving, landscaping and flatwork where storm system construction impacts existing improvements.

The Platte Farm Open Space Detention project is located at the corner of E 49th Ave and Grant St on approximately 2.3 acres of vacant land in the Globeville neighborhood. The project will reduce the risk of local flooding by capturing drainage flows that the existing 48th Avenue Outfall is unable to capture.

The Jackson Street Storm Drain Project will provide a critical link between the lower and upper Montclair Basin system for managing stormwater and offer improved flood protection for residents and businesses in the project area between Colfax and 12th Avenues, from Jackson to Albion Streets. For more information visit: https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/transportation-infrastructure/programs-services/projects/jackson-street-storm.html

  • The Marion Street System project extends from the termination of the 33rd Street Outfall project from MLK Blvd at Marion Street to approximately 22nd Avenue at Marion Street. This project will improve drainage in the Cole and Whittier neighborhoods. Future phases will improve drainage issues at 17th and Lafayette, 16th and Williams, Colfax and Williams, and High and Williams. The master plan pipe size ranges from 102 inches to 90 inches.This storm drain starts at the upstream end of the currently funded 33rd Street Outfall storm drain. The Phase 1 extension includes a new (approximately) 102 inches in diameter storm pipe in Marion Street from Martin Luther King Boulevard, south in Marion Street to E 27th Avenue in the Whittier Neighborhood. For more information visit: https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/transportation-infrastructure/programs-services/projects/marion-street-storm.html

The Cherry Creek Restoration Project is a collaborative project between the Mile High Flood District, the City and County of Denver, Arapahoe County, the Southeast Metro Stormwater Authority, and Denver Water to restore a one-mile reach of the Cherry Creek corridor between South Quebec Street and East Iliff Avenue. For more information visit: https://mhfd.org/residents/work-in-your-area/cherry-creek-restoration-project/ 

Denver's Department of Transportation and Infrastructure (DOTI) and Denver Parks & Recreation are improving water quality and constructing a new playground at La Lomita Park, formerly known as Asbury and Tejon Park. For more information visit: https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/wastewater-management/stormwater-quality/green-infrastructure/asbury-tejon.html

 

About General Storm projects: These annual projects are grouped into several packages for funding and management. Projects in the same package will typically begin work at the same time, even if they are not geographically connected. Read more about the General Storm Drainage Capital Improvement Program »

 

Design

The East 16th Avenue Storm Interceptor project area is located in Montclair Basin (Basin 4500-03) of the City and County of Denver Storm Drainage Master Plan. There are existing storm sewers in East 16th Avenue and Batavia Place which are currently undersized to convey the stormwater resulting in frequent and significant flooding of the neighborhood area. The goal of this project is to work with hydrology developed by the Outfall Systems Plan (OSP) team to size, design, and construct a new storm main line to safely transport the flows from existing systems in Colfax Avenue and East 16th Avenue towards City Park, while picking up the local flows along the way. For more information visit: https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/transportation-infrastructure/programs-services/projects/16th-ave-storm.html

The Five Points lining project will extend the life of the city sanitary system through a cost-effective technology that minimizes the impact to the citizens of Denver. A second benefit is to improve water and groundwater quality by lining existing sanitary systems that have cracks and may be leaking.

Grays Peak is a General Storm project focused on improving drainage across the city at the locations Cedar Ave & Perry, 11th Ave and Wabash/Willow Alley, and Elsworth Ave & S Garfield St.

Antero Peak is a General Storm project focused on improving drainage at the locations S Adams & Monroe Street and Bowles Ditch.

  • An sump in the alley, adjacent to 2200 S Franklin, results in ponding after rain events. Through surface improvements this issue will be alleviated, elminating the nusiance flooding that currently occurs.

This project includes local neighborhood storm drainage improvements that will extend the existing system from Oneida along 3rd Avenue in the Mayfair neighborhood to more adequately collect and convey stormwater.

The Mar Lee residential neighborhood was constructed primarily in the mid to late 1950s. Consistent with development at that time, there are no underground stormwater pipes in this project area. Therefore, stormwater runoff is currently served only with curbs, gutters and roadway cross-pans. Multiple stormwater studies have indicated the potential for excessive stormwater in the streets as well as flooding during heavy storms. The City and County of Denver and AECOM will proactively coordinate with residents and stakeholders to design a storm drain system that, once constructed, will improve greater protection from flooding with as little disruption to the community as possible.

Residents have reported that storm runoff pools at the intersection and heads towards the northwest corner of the intersection rather than draining into the inlets to Weir Gulch as intended. This project will add and upsize inlets and regrade the intersection to direct the flow to Weir Gulch. Concrete flatwork, such as curb, gutter, sidewalk and curb ramps and asphalt street paving will be part of the project.

The purpose of this system is to improve local drainage in the West Colfax neighborhood. This project will construct a 3-block drain in Stuart St from Colfax Ave south to Dry Gulch and help alleviate excessive stormwater runoff in the undersized Colfax Avenue storm main east of Stuart Street and remove poorly draining siphons in the West Colfax neighborhood.

This project will address a drainage complaint at 1515 Carlan Ct. The project will build a storm drainage system and outfall to Sanderson Gulch. This storm system will match the first phase of the S. Carlan St. Outfall proposed in the 2014 Master Plan as Project B in Basin 5100-01. The project team is also looking at incorporating water quality.

This lining project will extend the life of the city sanitary system through a cost-effective technology that minimizes the impact to the citizens of Denver. A second benefit is to improve water and groundwater quality by lining existing sanitary systems that have cracks and may be leaking.

This project will remove and replace existing sanitary sewer in Speer Blvd from W 29th Ave to Bryant St. The existing sewer pipe in these segments has excessive buildup of calcium deposits to the extent that TV inspection and other maintenance equipment cannot get into the pipe without risking getting stuck. Multiple TV inspections have not been able to be completed. This project will allow the City's sanitary system to be properly maintained and mitigates larger problems that may occur in the future.

This project will replace an existing storm sewer system in southwest Denver that connects to Sanderson Gulch. The current storm infrastructure was built around a sanitary sewer service line, and the two systems need to be separated for water quality purposes. The stormwater infrastructure will be rebuilt and portions of the sanitary sewer infrastructure may also be realigned.

The Jackson Street Storm Drain Project will provide a critical link between the lower and upper Montclair Basin system for managing stormwater and offer improved flood protection for residents and businesses in the project area between Colfax and 12th Avenues, from Jackson to Albion Streets. For more information visit: https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/transportation-infrastructure/programs-services/projects/jackson-street-storm.html

The Marion Street System project extends from the termination of the 33rd Street Outfall project from MLK Blvd at Marion Street to approximately 22nd Avenue at Marion Street. This project will improve drainage in the Cole and Whittier neighborhoods. Future phases will improve drainage issues at 17th and Lafayette, 16th and Williams, Colfax and Williams, and High and Williams. The master plan pipe size ranges from 102 inches to 90 inches.This storm drain starts at the upstream end of the currently funded 33rd Street Outfall storm drain. The Phase 1 extension includes a new (approximately) 102 inches in diameter storm pipe in Marion Street from Martin Luther King Boulevard, south in Marion Street to E 27th Avenue in the Whittier Neighborhood. For more information visit: https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/transportation-infrastructure/programs-services/projects/marion-street-storm.html

The City & County of Denver is planning stormwater pipe and infrastructure improvements beginning at Lollipop Lake in Garland Park and the Cherry Creek waterway and ending at E. Tennessee Avenue and S. Oneida Street. This goal of this project is to decrease property damage due to local flooding; increase pedestrian and driver safety during storm events; and improve water quality for stormwater runoff that will be going into Lollipop Lake and Cherry Creek. For more information visit: https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/transportation-infrastructure/programs-services/projects/tennessee-oneida.html

This project is an integrated construction project with 100 year flood protection improvement project which involves upgrades and additions to the existing Heron Pond in North Denver. The park will re-envision approximately 80 acres of city property and existing open space around Heron Pond to serve as a regional and local amenity. This community-driven effort will develop a plan for future recreation amenities and provide the opportunity for residents to engage with nature along river in the Globeville and Elyria/Swansea neighborhoods. For more information visit: https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/denver-parks-and-recreation/planning/park-facility-projects/heron-pond-master-plan.html

Overview

This project involves installing three concrete and boulder drainage structures along the canal to hold the water quality event and release it slowly over an extended period of time. The installation of two water quality trash vaults and four drive-through forebays are incorporated as a part of the pretreatment system. This is part of the annual water quality projects to meet and/or exceed regulatory requirements to provide water quality within the City and County of Denver.

  • Location High Line Canal from approximately Wellshire GC to I-25
  • Project Type Water Quality – Regional
  • Council District 4
  • Neighborhood University Hills
  • Estimated Cost $1,200,000
  • Construction Timeline Fall/ Winter 2020 to Summer/Fall 2021
  • Engineer Enginuity

project area map for WQ Highline Canal project

The Federal Boulevard project is a green infrastructure project that will improve water quality for areas on and around South Federal Boulevard between Alameda and Mississippi. For more information visit: https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/wastewater-management/stormwater-quality/green-infrastructure/federal-green-boulevard.html

This project will build a new City of Denver Park at the NE corner of W Kentucky Ave and S Irving St. Green infrastructure elements will also be constructed at this intersection. In coordination with Safe Routes to School, traffic calming medians will also be constructed along Kentucky Ave at the intersections of Newton, Meade, Lowell and Hazel.

The Globeville Levee project was identified as a key project to reduce flood risk in the Globeville/Utah Junction basin (Basin 0059-01). The Globeville Stormwater System Study (GSSS) completed by Merrick and Company, final draft dated December 2019 identified that the height of the existing levee located along the west side of the South Platte River, next to the existing trail, is approximately 2 feet lower than the 3 feet minimum freeboard required by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in most locations, and identified a spill location during a 100-year storm event just south of 38th Street on the west bank of the river, south and upstream of the existing levee. The GSSS evaluated options and provided recommendations for reducing the risk of river flooding to avoid floodplain re-designation from this spill. Implementation of this project will reduce flood risk in the Globeville/Utah Junction basin (Basin 0059-01).

The 48th Avenue Storm Drain Interceptor project was identified as a key project to relieve drainage problems in the Globeville neighborhood and serves the Globeville/Utah Junction basin (Basin 0059-01). A drainage analysis and conceptual design was completed as part of the Globeville Stormwater System Study (GSSS) – Final Draft December 2019 is complete as a basis for the project for review and evaluation. As recommended in the GSSS, the general project alignment starts at Lincoln Street along 48th Avenue, passes through Argo Park, under the BNSF railway, along Elgin Place, crosses Washington Street, and then continues along 48th Avenue to a new outfall into the South Platte River. It is intended that the downstream portion from the west side of Washington Street to the South Platte River (Phase 1) will be designed and constructed in advance of any other phases of the project. The project will include preliminary design (30%) and up to 60% design for the 48th Avenue corridor, but will only prepare the final design (90% and 100%) for Phase 1 as outlined above.

Studies

This project is a comprehensive update to the 2009 Sanitary Master Plan.

For more information, visit: http://www.iconeng.com/project/sand-creek/

For more information, visit: https://www.irondalegulch-osp.com/

For more information, visit: http://www.enginuity-es.com/lakewoodgulch